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HowardLi

Kuhn Rikon pressure cooker

16 posts in this topic

I'm not sure if my pressure cooker is working properly or not. Is it normal to hear boiling noises while there is pressure inside the cooker?

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I'm not sure if my pressure cooker is working properly or not. Is it normal to hear boiling noises while there is pressure inside the cooker?

I have one and it's pretty darn quiet.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Are you using the trivet? I find it makes more noise than without.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Of course there will be boiling inside the PC.

 

The water temperature inside is above 212F. When pressure starts to leak out, the water inside will boil.

 

dcarch

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Of course there will be boiling inside the PC.

 

The water temperature inside is above 212F. When pressure starts to leak out, the water inside will boil.

 

dcarch

But the OP asked if you could hear it not if it happened.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The whole point of a 'non-venting' pressure cooker is to prevent that pressure leakage by regulating the heat before it happens, no? Mine is basically completely silent under normal usage, except when I use very high heat and have the trivet in.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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The whole point of a 'non-venting' pressure cooker is to prevent that pressure leakage by regulating the heat before it happens, no? Mine is basically completely silent under normal usage, except when I use very high heat and have the trivet in.

 

I am not sure what makes "non-venting" PC possible. For non-venting to happen, the BTU from the fire must be 100% equal to the (a) total radiant (IR) heat lost and well as (b) heat lost by conduction to outside air. If the fire is a little hotter than (a) & (b), non-venting is not possible.

 

If the fire is less than (a) & (b), the pressure inside will not be building up to meet temperature specification.

 

Just curious.

 

dcarch

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The KR is supposed to keep everything contained until the pressure is greater than 15 psi. Above that point, I would definitely agree that it is supposed to vent. Otherwise, it isn't - and if it isn't venting, then there shouldn't be any boiling once the gas pressure is in equilibrium or greater than the vapour pressure of the water (or whatever it is, my high school chemistry is failing me on this point).

 

I called into their service line a few months ago asking about this since I thought it would be covered under warranty, but they said the valve assembly thingy was a wear item and not covered. I've had it for less than 2 years and used it an embarassingly low number of times.

I am not sure what makes "non-venting" PC possible. For non-venting to happen, the BTU from the fire must be 100% equal to the (a) total radiant (IR) heat lost and well as (b) heat lost by conduction to outside air. If the fire is a little hotter than (a) & (b), non-venting is not possible.

 

If the fire is less than (a) & (b), the pressure inside will not be building up to meet temperature specification.

 

Just curious.

 

dcarch

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The only sound that comes from my KRs is the normal 'hissing' that goes on.

Maybe you have the heat set too high?  Do you put it on high heat until regulator pops up and then turn it down as low as possible to achieve the correct pressure?

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I am not sure what makes "non-venting" PC possible. For non-venting to happen, the BTU from the fire must be 100% equal to the (a) total radiant (IR) heat lost and well as (b) heat lost by conduction to outside air. If the fire is a little hotter than (a) & (b), non-venting is not possible.

The KR doesn't begin venting until a bit over fifteen psi, actually (I can't recall the actual number: 18, maybe?). So in practice what happens is that once you get close to fifteen you drop the heat way down, and the cooker reaches the equilibrium you mention at some pressure near fifteen psi. As you say, the trick is to keep tweaking the burner level until you hit that sweet spot where the equilibrium is reached at as close to fifteen psi as possible, making sure to never get it so hot that it begins to vent. With some practice you can get pretty good at it.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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The only sound that comes from my KRs is the normal 'hissing' that goes on.

Maybe you have the heat set too high?  Do you put it on high heat until regulator pops up and then turn it down as low as possible to achieve the correct pressure?

I don't think it's a question of the heat being too high. Once my spring valve starts going beyond the first line, there shouldn't be any more boiling inside. But there is.

 

And yeah, it's hissing all the time, even though it hasn't built pressure yet.

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I would call KR - I found their cust. service very good when I had a problem with mine.

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I would call KR - I found their cust. service very good when I had a problem with mine.

As I mentioned earlier, they said it was a wear item and it would not be under warranty.

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As I mentioned earlier, they said it was a wear item and it would not be under warranty.

 

A valve is not a wear item.

 

Tires are wear items in a car, but valves in the engine's cylinders are not.

 

dcarch

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As I mentioned earlier, they said it was a wear item and it would not be under warranty.

Sorry, I didnt see that. I had a similar situation, but I guess Igot lucky - they toldme to ship it back and they fixed it for free.

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A valve is not a wear item.

 

Tires are wear items in a car, but valves in the engine's cylinders are not.

 

dcarch

It is if it has a seal(s).

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