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Darienne

Hard candy dog molds - ISO

6 posts in this topic

I make lollipops for local organizations to sell to made some money.  And while I do have a goodly number of hard candy molds, I've been unable to find suitable dog molds and would dearly love to buy some.  I've checked a number of online sites and found nothing that I can use so far. 

 

Any help out there?  Please and thank you. 

 

Sorry.  Should have been more specific.  Hard candy dog LOLLIPOP molds only. 


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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The only one really worth having is an Airedale.

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Watch out, gweb.  They'll get you for that!!!

 

Thanks rajoress.  It's never exactly what you want, but it's a good start.  Have you ordered and used any of these lollipop molds yourself?  The problem can be can that they really aren't formed quite correctly to take a lolly stick.  I've had that experience.  Except for the paw print mold, they do look as if they might well be correctly formed to take the stick.  Thanks again.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Darienne - I typically don't make lollipops but I have bought from the 'getsuckered" website for pops for wedding favors. I work with chocolate and it usually is tricky in getting the stick to lie straight, I notice that sometimes the channel for the stick slopes down so if you don't watch out, the stick will pop out of the chocolate. Sometimes I wait until the chocolate is set before putting the stick in, but I'm assuming you don't have this luxury with hard candy. Sorry I'm not more help! Best of luck!

Ruth

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Thanks Ruth.  I can always fall back on my old standard large rounds. 

And no, you can barely get all the candy mixture out of its container before it simply hardens inside around the walls.  It helps to work with someone who can reposition whatever sticks need resticking. 


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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