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Lisa Shock

"Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Bread"

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The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.

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I think that depends on how you define "modernist": in many respects bakers and pastry chefs have always been the most "modernist" of chefs in terms of their approach to the craft. They may not use a lot of whiz-bang ingredients, but I think the thought process is definitely the same, with lots of careful analysis and testing.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Anna N   

Now this is exciting news! I just hope they keep it approachable by home bakers.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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slkinsey   

I hope, hope, hope there is an extensive section on sourdough microbiology and techniques.

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Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Smithy   

I hope, hope, hope there is an extensive section on sourdough microbiology and techniques.

 

Oh, that would make it well worth the price of admission.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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fvandrog   

I hope, hope, hope there is an extensive section on sourdough microbiology and techniques.

 

I think sourdough microbiology is highly interesting, but region, climate, season etc. make a lot of difference. For those near Seattle, a tome on their local sourdough microbiology might be interesting I have a hard time seeing such a work being of general interest. I'd love to be surprised, however.

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I'd personally be pretty surprised if they didn't cover it, for just that reason: I'd love to see some science behind all the sourdough mythology. I know Sam has posted quite a bit, but it would be great to see it in print.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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rotuts   

Im looking forward to this as many are.   I have not baked in a bit.

 

the two 'Baker Chefs' mentioned in the blurb have a lot of insight.

 

the blurb from MC really talks about Bread.

 

I do hope that they include Patisserie .

 

but that's its own world.

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CKatCook   

OH man...I am so going to have to get this.


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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chefmd   

I am so excited about this book.  Just starting to venture into baking, so far mastered Ken Forkish bread recipe with amazing results (Ken's achievement, not mine).  I am sure there is so much I can learn and try from MC team.  I would totally pre order if that was an option.  Still remember painful wait for original MC volumes.

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I hope, hope, hope there is an extensive section on sourdough microbiology and techniques.

 

It's fantastic to get feedback like this. It's still fairly early in the project so we're in the early stages of researching, planning, and determining what we will cover, however we very much welcome feedback about bread-related topics that interest the community. 


Caren Palevitz

Online Writer for Modernist Cuisine

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rotuts   

will it be exclusively Bread ?

 

any patisserie ?  please do not leave that out .

 

many thanks

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Bojana   

Both bread and patisserie are fantastic topics, i would love to see both. In patisserei perhaps trying to find the hacks that make some difficult or time consuming preparations more doable?

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One topic that I would like to see covered is the effects of alternate, plant-based 'milks' on breads and cakes. I see people telling others to just substitute soymilk, almond milk, rice milk, etc. for cow's milk in recipes and I wonder if they provide the same dough conditioning features as cow's milk.

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For myself I hope they stick to wheat, water, yeast, and salt.  Surely nathanm and the team can get at least five volumes out of four ingredients.

 

If so I'll buy it.

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AnneN   

On their website, it says 2016.


Anne Napolitano

Chef On Call

"Great cooking doesn't come from breaking with tradition but taking it in new directions-evolution rather that revolution." Heston Blumenthal

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