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Atomizer

Sous Vide Egg Custard Tart

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Atomizer   

Hi does anyone have a recipe for custard in the Sous Vide that I can use for an Egg Custard Tart. I have tried a few recipes for Sous Vide and they don't seem to set after 24 hrs in the fridge. What is it that determines the thickness/setting time More egg yolks? More Sugar?

 

I want to make 1.5 litres.

 

Many thanks

 

 

David


Edited by Atomizer (log)

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I've made the pastry cream from Modernist Cuisine at Home with good results: the ratios are

Heavy cream 100%

Whole milk 100%

Sugar 64%

Salt .3%

Egg yolks 200%

Butter 50%

 

The egg yolks are cooked at 80°C for 35 minutes and then blended with the remaining ingredients (potentially after the cream has been infused with a flavoring).


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Merkinz   

I've made the pastry cream from Modernist Cuisine at Home with good results: the ratios are

Heavy cream 100%

Whole milk 100%

Sugar 64%

Salt .3%

Egg yolks 200%

Butter 50%

 

The egg yolks are cooked at 80°C for 35 minutes and then blended with the remaining ingredients (potentially after the cream has been infused with a flavoring).

 

I also made this. But with poor results. Mine did not set up at all. If you took a slice out of the tart within an hour most of the filling had oozed out :| ... Next time I make this I will use gelatine to set it.

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Tri2Cook   

I'm going to preface this by saying that I am a fan of modernist techniques and use many of them on a fairly regular basis. That said, sometimes they just really are not the best way to go. Maybe it depends on the quality of one's sous vide setup, though I don't see why it would matter in this situation, but cooking a firm sliceable custard with only egg as the thickening agent using sous vide has never worked out well for me. I'm of the opinion that the purpose of modernist techniques being used in place of traditional methods is that they either improve upon the traditional methods or simplify traditional methods while maintaining equal results. In my experience, trying to do a firm egg custard via sous vide doesn't accomplish either of those goals. Which means the only real benefit is the cool factor of calling it a sous vide custard tart. But I'm always happy to learn so hopefully someone will chime in that's had better luck with it.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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My guess is that the custard is not getting to temp. Liquid custard in a bag can be difficult to time, since the bag can settle differently. I would bump the temp up to 81 or 82 degrees, and make sure the bag is flat and thin as can be to allow for the best heat transfer. You can use a thermometer to make sure the custard has reached 80C.

 

I use a sous vide bath for creme brulee a la MCaH, and it works amazingly, but I have to increase the time to account for somewhat larger custard cups. As long as it reaches 80C though, it's good. 

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I also made this. But with poor results. Mine did not set up at all. If you took a slice out of the tart within an hour most of the filling had oozed out :| ... Next time I make this I will use gelatine to set it.

Interesting: you can see my results here, I didn't have stability problems at all. I wonder what the difference was?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Tri2Cook   

Interesting: you can see my results here, I didn't have stability problems at all. I wonder what the difference was?

That is interesting. I'll have to give the MC recipe a shot. I don't have a particular need to do my pastry cream via sous vide but I do have a particular need to be able to do my pastry cream via sous vide now that I've seen a successful version. My need to know how to do things is not directly tied to my need to do the things.

Edited because for some reason I hit "enter" before I was done typing.

 


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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