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New Anova Precision Cooker Announced May 6, 2014


pmilas
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in the US, $179 for the new one, and $199 for the A1?

$20 is "very slight" on a piece of kitchen equipment, irrespective of 'percentage'

the LID for a Cambro costs more

Disagree. A 10% mark down is a huge deal from a business perspective. And they are - regardless of our passion for the craft - a business.

Walmart dedicates millions in resources researching how producers can shave pennies off their prices. Those have huge effects on volume.

A product like the Anova is strange and new for most people, has very little word of mouth supporting it, and doesn't "make sense" to the masses. Every dollar they shave off the price brings it within the threshold price of a new group of consumers.

They aren't going to make their millions off people like you and me. They need to appeal to the average home cook, and price is the biggest factor on something new like this.

In either case, I'm excited to see people getting their units. I want mine even more now.

 

EDIT: The average home cook would never dream of paying what we pay for a plastic bin to hold water. I don't think the Cambro is a fair comparison.

Edited by lordratner (log)
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in the US, $179 for the new one, and $199 for the A1?

$20 is "very slight" on a piece of kitchen equipment, irrespective of 'percentage'

the LID for a Cambro costs more

And that's before discounts and coupons on the V1 that have been offered

I really like my V1 and really hope the V2 is not a step down as far as performance goes. Rotating the unit instead of a removable directional cap is already a compromise.

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And that's before discounts and coupons on the V1 that have been offered

I really like my V1 and really hope the V2 is not a step down as far as performance goes. Rotating the unit instead of a removable directional cap is already a compromise.

 

But against that is the new clamp.  I've seen a photo of the new Anova sitting on a benchtop, supported only by its clamp being slid all the way down the 'barrel'.  THAT'S flexibility in vessel depth!

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True and the adjustable clamp was what really made me want the V2. For the most part my 8 qt Cambro is about as small as I go for most things which the V1 fits in nicely. I guess if doing a few eggs the adjustable clamp would come in handy to just use a small sauce pan. My units arrive tomorrow. Will have to play around with it over the next month or so

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I have one of mine running. Very quite. Temp reading taken at 37C, 50C and 65C. The first was 0.1C off by my Thermapen and readings at 50C and 65C were dead on

My second unit was dead on at 4 temp levels.

Getting use to the new touch screen and scroll wheel

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My second unit was dead on at 4 temp levels.

Getting use to the new touch screen and scroll wheel

 

I wouldn't trust a thermopen to 0.1 deg C.  My Anova matched my Hewlett Packard thermometer so that was good enough for me.  Nonetheless next time I use the Anova I plan to compare it to my new thermopen.that I just got this week.

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Not necessarily any fault of the Anova, but I thought the NY Times writeup and accompanying video were sloppy and not very helpful to the layman. And I was suspicious about the writer's reference to the iphone app. Giving him the benefit of the doubt, I suppose he may have been given access to a pre-release version of the app, but he should have said that to avoid the suspicion of cheating on his research. Overall the journalism seemed a little shoddy even for a fairly light lifestyle/tech topic.

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If he has access to the new Anova, which won't be officially released until December....why is it so difficult to believe that he may have access to the app....and why is that a problem, exactly?

 

"The app, which will be released in December, should make it easy for people who are new to sous vide to get up to speed."

 

"110v systems will be available December 2014"

"The iPhone App makes it incredibly easy to cook with Anova."

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

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The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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If he has access to the new Anova, which won't be officially released until December....why is it so difficult to believe that he may have access to the app....and why is that a problem, exactly?

 

"The app, which will be released in December, should make it easy for people who are new to sous vide to get up to speed."

 

"110v systems will be available December 2014"

"The iPhone App makes it incredibly easy to cook with Anova."

 

I can't swear to it, but I am pretty sure that this is a revision. When I read it a day or two ago I remember being struck that the writer gave the impression that he had used the app and that there was no mention that the app was not yet available.

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my Hard Copy from the NYTimes is dated 20 Nov.  meaning it was published the night before.

 

"My favorite of the new crop [of circulators  ed. by me] is the Anova Precision Cooker, which I've been using for a couple of months "

 

"Anova's smartphone app add-0n helps with this [time, temp, cut etc ed Me] Need to know how to make the perfect chicken thighs ?

 

just consult the app. and press start."

 

I thought the printed piece was all a newbie might need to get interested in SV.

 

Print is a different genre these days.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I can't swear to it, but I am pretty sure that this is a revision. When I read it a day or two ago I remember being struck that the writer gave the impression that he had used the app and that there was no mention that the app was not yet available.

 

When NY Times revises an article they generally post a notice to that effect...just like eGullet.  As of now there is no edit notice on the sous vide article and the Anova information is just as I remember it from when I first read the article on the 19th.

 

 

Edit:  I note that currently this sous vide article is number one for "most viewed" and "most emailed" in the Technology section.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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I really like my V1 and really hope the V2 is not a step down as far as performance goes. Rotating the unit instead of a removable directional cap is already a compromise.

The V2 does have a removable directional cap. It has 3 positions you can put it in.

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I should note the connection for that cap is a bit flimsy, and you have to make sure it's really twisted on securely if you don't want it to come off while running.

 

That said, I used mine for the first time last night, to make what the Japanese would call onsen tamago, and others might call poached-in-the-shell eggs. Brilliant! 149ºF for 45 minutes, VERY soft white and yolk. I might play with temps and time for a more "traditionally" textured poached egg, but that doesn't mean what I had last night wasn't awesome.

 

Time to defrost those short ribs from my 1/16th cow purchase...

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I should note the connection for that cap is a bit flimsy, and you have to make sure it's really twisted on securely if you don't want it to come off while running.

 

 

Which connection? I've been using the V2 for a while now and it's as solidly built as the V1.

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Which connection? I've been using the V2 for a while now and it's as solidly built as the V1.

 

The clip-on mechanism for that directional cap. It's not as secure as I'd like, but it's not a huge complaint.

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The clip-on mechanism for that directional cap. It's not as secure as I'd like, but it's not a huge complaint.

 

Out of curiosity, did you tighten both knobs? The one that secures the clamp to the pot, and second that secures the circulator to the clamp?

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Out of curiosity, did you tighten both knobs? The one that secures the clamp to the pot, and second that secures the circulator to the clamp?

I think you are talking about the clamp and we were talking about the plastic directional cap at the bottom
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