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mrk

Best chocolate cake books?

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I'm wondering what you recommend as the best books about France chocolate cakes or great chocolate? Thank

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I don't think I've seen a book that is only about French chocolate cakes.  There aren't many books that are only on chocolate cakes, as Chris says it's pretty specific!  

 

One older book I can think of is a compilation of 50 chocolate cake recipes that were featured in the weekly food section of our local paper.  Some of the contributors are very well respected chefs and I'm sure they're all delicious.  I guess you can order it from overseas...

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I have Pierre Herme's Chocolate Desserts, which is a nice collection of classic French desserts with detailed instructions by Dorie Greenspan. Most of the recipes are a bit involved. The few that I tried were very nice - the macarons of course, the truffles, and the chocolate hazelnut dacquoise which is sublime.

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Did this book have English version??

I have not seen one, I ordered off UK amazon and the french language book was the only one offered. For recipes, I trust my own translations more than the publishers, not sure what QA they put the translations through but I have seen some bad ones in other books. I don't speak french at all but the grammar for recipes is quite simple fortunately.

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Unfortunately, that just French version.

 

I want get some advice for chocolate book, I have "Chocolates and Confections: Formula, Theory, and Technique for the Artisan Confectioner" and "making artisan chocolates" already, Should I get "Couture Chocolate: A Masterclass in Chocolate" this book to enhance chocolate technique and knowledge? this book content would a lot of part same as other book I already had? Thank

 

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Unfortunately, that just French version.

 

I want get some advice for chocolate book, I have "Chocolates and Confections: Formula, Theory, and Technique for the Artisan Confectioner" and "making artisan chocolates" already, Should I get "Couture Chocolate: A Masterclass in Chocolate" this book to enhance chocolate technique and knowledge? this book content would a lot of part same as other book I already had? Thank

 

 

The Couture Chocolate book by William Curley is very good but this is not a 'french book' other than in title. The authors are based in London and there is a strong Japanese influence from the author's wife. They are about to release a patisserie book so you may want to wait and see what that contains.  

 

I have had success with everything I have made but i bought it primarily for the chocolate confection recipes. I would say it is aimed at the home chocolate maker who does not want to purchase a large amount of equipment. Table tempering and seeding are covered but there is very little trouble-shooting content.

 

I treat it as a recipe book rather than a techniques book.

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The US Amazon.com page for Chocolat is also for the French version, and I can't turn up any translations. lapin d'or, is this primarily a book of recipes, or is there a lot of supplemental text?

Well no, there is not a lot of text but many of the 'base recipes' at the beginning have have several step by step photos to demonstrate the process. Quite a few of the recipes are very much dessert type cakes or mousses and there are some ice creams too. 

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The Couture Chocolate book by William Curley is very good but this is not a 'french book' other than in title. The authors are based in London and there is a strong Japanese influence from the author's wife. They are about to release a patisserie book so you may want to wait and see what that contains.  

 

I have had success with everything I have made but i bought it primarily for the chocolate confection recipes. I would say it is aimed at the home chocolate maker who does not want to purchase a large amount of equipment. Table tempering and seeding are covered but there is very little trouble-shooting content.

 

I treat it as a recipe book rather than a techniques book.

Thank you

 

yes,this is not a 'french book', I find out this book cause I saw a special recipe form book and I am curious, I admire who make awesome confectionery. and this "Patisserie: Mastering the Fundamentals of French Pastry"

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Does anyone know this book English version http://www.amazon.ca/ENCYCLOPÉDIE-DU-CHOCOLAT-L-COLLECTIF/dp/2081237245

Thank

It's the same book as the French version previously linked here.

Thank all of you, I wondering the book of Encyclopedie du Chocolat is France version, the English version is " cooking with chocolate essential recipes and techniques " ?? Thank


Edited by Franci (log)

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It's the same book as the French version previously linked here.

 

:shock: oh Sorry, I forgot....

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