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Rosie

The French Laundry 2001 - 2005

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a couple of notes: as has been pointed out, the oysters and pearls is based on a sabayon, not on butter

The oysters and pearl dish has egg in the sabayon, but could a member with the book verify that there is no butter? If that's the case, the dish has a very deceptively buttery taste.

I now have a copy of the French Laundry Cookbook. As Schielke noted, butter is in the "Oysters and Pearls" dish, althogh not technically in the sabayon portion of the dish. However, the sabayon was indistinguishable from the sauce when I sampled the dish.

There is not only the butter reference noted by Stone, but also the recipe for "Oysters and Pearls" (p. 23). The ingredients list includes, for the sauce "8 tablespoons (4 ounces) unsalted butter, cut into 8 pieces". This is for 8 servings, so it is approx. 1 tablespoon of butter per serving. The butter is whisked into the sauce piece by piece, with the reference to buerre monte noted by Stone being made in the recipe.

sorry for the confusion and this distraction on what was a very interesting thread. i didn't mean to imply that there was NO butter in the oysters and pearls ... i doubt there's anything at the FL that's butter-free, including the salads. The original description of the basewas A BUTTER, which to me implies a flavored butter or a beurre montee. that's all.

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Fred and Ginger

Gable and Lombard

Tracey and Hepburn

Hepburn and Grant

Stone and Cabrales at the French Laundry.

A thread worthy of praise and thanks. These posts are classics. Yountville will be on my itinerary next I am on that side of the continent.

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SUNDAY DINNER

Our party of 4 arrived ready to dine! A few years back I had played tour guide to a large group of friends in Napa. One of the items on the agenda was dinner at the FL. The night of the meal, two friends backed out (the husband was not up for a formal dining experience). Ever since, the wife has asked me when I would arrange another evening at FL. We finally got our schedules in sync...so here we were - one FL virgin with extremely high expectations, and three diners who had been to FL before and were looking forwarding to recreating the pleasure we had on other occasions.

Upon being seated we enjoyed a glass of Billecart Salmon (seems to be the "champagne by the glass of the moment" everywhere!). One of our foursome is a Master Sommelier- so we looked forward to his wine selections for dinner. Of course we chose the 9 course tasting menu...and asked if we could add a course...our requested was accepted. The obligatory salmon tartare tuilles arrived and we were off to the races.

WINE: 2001 Araujo"Eisele Vineyard" Sauvignon Blanc

Course One: For the first time in a while, my caviar allergy worked to my advantage. While the rest of the table enjoyed the "Oysters and Pearls"-"Sabayon" of Pearl Tapioca withPoached Bagaduce Oysters with Osetra Caviar...I was the lucky recipient of "White Truffle Custard with a Ragout of Black Winter Truffles"-An simple white eggcup arrived holding an eggshell filled with an ethereally light white truffle oil infused custard topped with a layer of veal based truffle sauce. I shared small spoonfuls with my friends...who all agreed, that even though the "Oyster and Pearl" dish was nice...this one was superior :wub: .

Course Two: We ordered two each of the Foie Gras dishes for sharing purposes....Moulard Duck "Foie Gras Au Torchon" with Bergamot Orange "Marmalade" and Toasted Brioche and the Sauteed Moulard Duck "Foie Gras" with Roasted Anjou Pears and Clove Gastrique. Again luck prevailed and the Torchon was placed in front of me. A lovely smooth foie torchon in the center of an a long oblong plate. A small container of the orange marmalade to the left and dots of balsamic reduction and a small mound of sea salt and fresh cracked pepper. On a seperate plate...a large piece of golden brown brioche perfectly halved and placed standing on the cut portion. What a great combination...even though none of us are huge marmalade fans, we agreed this was heaven. I had a very hard time releasing the plate to accept the sauteed foie. A beautiful preparation but I was coveting the rest of the torchon. And on a service note, as we were preparing to swap plates the waiters appeared out of now where to accomplish the task for us...and provide fresh warm slices of brioche.

Wine: 1999 Pierre Morey Mersault Perrieres

Course Three: Sauteed Filet of Pacific Sablefish served with Carraway-scented Roasted Savoy Cabbage and Fruitwood Smoked Salmon Veloute. My least favorite course. i had never had sauteed sablefish before. The fish itself was a bit strongly flavored...which was necessary to stand up to the carraway and smoked salmon flavors...it arrived perfectly cooked (moist)...but, it was not to my taste. Our table was in agreement on this dish too.

At this point we enjoyed our additional course: Pan Roasted Maine Diver Scallop with Carmelized Cauliflower, Truffle Puree and Julienne of Perigord Truffle- Outstanding :wub: a single, huge scallop...lightly golden on the outside perched atop the truffle puree (I think it was a potato base infused with truffle oil and black truffle). Crosswise slices of petit cauliflower dotted the plate. Then came the waiter with a very large Perigord black truffle. He was verrry generous when shaving the truffle :smile: ...and the aroma enveloped the table.

Course Four: The original lobster dish on the menu would not have gone well with the wines we had chosen for our "white wine matches" and the red would not have gone well either...so, our waiter volunteered to ask Chef Keller if he would make a lobster dish to pair more effectively with out Mersault...Instead of the "Sweet Butter Poached Maine Lobster. Pan Roasted Bone Marrow (which I would love to have had all on its own), Shiitake Mushrooms, Scallion Salad and Suace "Bordelaise"...we received a variation of Peas and Carrots. Since the kitchen had not expected to serve that dish we received the Maine Lobster atop the carrot puree topped with the pea sprouts, but without the crepe Cabrales and Stone received. There was a splash of "carrot powder" across the plate. This dish is definitely one of the reasons God made lobster.

Wine: 1997 Roche di Manzoni "Vigna Capelli di Steffano" Barolo (glass)

Wine: 2000 Domaine du Caillou "Les Quartz" Chateauneuf du Pape

Course Five: Epaule de Lapin Braisse et Farci Au Boudin de Bratwurst Servie Avec Des Lentils Du Puy et Pommes Parisienne- The leg and shoulder of a rabbit, braised and pushed up to form almost a rabbit "lollipop" on the bone...stuffed with a blend of rabbit meat and served atop lentils with potatoes. The rabbit was golden brown and tender enough where a knife was not a necessity. There was also a swipe of the braising liquid across the plate.

Course Six: "Chateaubriand de Veau" Roasted Filet of Four Story Hills Farm nature fed Veal, Red Beet and Perigord Truffle Duxelles, Risolle of New Crop Potatoes and Fines Herb Mousse- The veal medallions were a tad bit more cooked than I prefer...medium instead of medium rare. They were still tender, but needed the accompaniments for additional flavor. The touch of truffle was, unfortunately, very insignificant. I did not try the potatoes...but, the beets were well prepared. Not a bad dish...but, not in the same league as our other courses.

Course Seven: "Elaborate" with celery root puree, celery branch salad and garden mache- I missed the description...but, I think it was a semi-hard goat cheese. I would like to know more about the celery preparation...as it was julienned and still a bright green, but had a soft texture similar to suateed celeraic. A very nice transition from savory to sweet.

Wine: 1999 Alban Vineyards Oechsle

Course Eight: Bartlett Pear Sorbet with Vahlrona Chocolate Pudding and Petite Crostini- A small round wafer provided the base for an icredibly dense, rich pudding. The sorbet had a bright pear flavor. The flavors worked together well.

Course Nine: "Degustation D'Abricots Seches", Royal Blenheim Apricot Chiboust with Apricot Cake and Apricot Sorbet...I enjoyed the apricot sorbet and a bite of the chiboust...both intensely apricot flavored...I only took tiny bites as the waiter also brought us each minature hazelnut pots du creme and minature creme brulees...(more calories=more intersting :raz: ). The hazelnut pot du creme was smooth and thick a nd roared hazelnut...and the creme brulee was very nice, but I preferred the pot du creme.

Mignardises- Unfortunately I made the trek "upstairs" at this point...and was confronted by a long wait...so when I returned there was only one chocolate macaroon left :sad: ...I have no idea what else was brought, as there weren't even any tell tale crumb traces...my friends covered their tracks well :rolleyes: .

We had an absolutely lovely evening. Our waiters (we had 2) were very pleasant and provided what I call shadow service...you know it is there, but you rarely notice it (a good thing). I did not really interact with the sommelier as my MS friend did. But, he provided the appropriate service. I am already looking forward to returning in the spring.

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On the trek "upstairs", as southern girl knows, there are in fact at least two washrooms upstairs. To mimize time away from the table, members should note that not only is there a single (unisex) washroom to the right when one has ascended the stairway (it will be obvious), but there is one much further from the stairway, and hidden from view when one is at the top of the stairs. It is almost "adjacent" to the visible washroom, but only accessible when one "goes around" and passes certain tables.

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southern girl,

Others have commented that the weakest parts of the French Laundry menu are the meat courses. Was this your experience? From your description, the rabbit dish was an A and the veal less than.

The "White Truffle Custard with a Ragout of Black Winter Truffles" is incredible. This is when Thomas Keller's comment that he wants you to say after tasting a dish,"God, I wish I had just one more bite of that," is so true.

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A subquestion to lizziee's inquiry: Do other members have views on whether the second meat course in the chef's tasting (i.e., before the cheese) tends to be weaker or stronger than the first meat course in the progression?


Edited by cabrales (log)

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Lizziee- I would have to say in this particular meal, the veal course was definitely the weak spot in the meal...it just didn't have the "umph- oh god" factor the other courses had. My last meal before this one was a bit over two years ago...so, I wouldn't want to compare...as I can't find my notes.

Cabrales- in general, when I do chef's tasting menu's I find the 2nd courses to be stronger (IMO)- The second meat course is usually the "Big Boy"- lamb, squab or other strongly flavored game bird, venison or some other game or perhaps beef. I think chefs tend to progress from the "less strong" flavors to the stronger so diners are less likely to suffer palate fatigue from the earlier courses (and subsequently the wine they might order to accompany the food).


Edited by southern girl (log)

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southern girl -- Apologies I wasn't clear before. By strength, I meant culinary merit of the dish.

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I would still go with the second meat course being stronger on culinary merit...something like building to a crescendo before beginning a slow denoument (sp) starting with the cheese/salad and progressing through to the "mignardises" (unless the diner is a dessert fiend who thinks the only reason for the other 7 courses is to get to the dessert :raz: )!

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Another thing I found a little surprising was that FL's logo, seen here on their clothes-pin:

fcae3ede.jpg

seems to me to be somewhat art-deco modern.  I'd expect this type of logo on the Empire State Building or a vintage 1950's model train set.  Funny, though, that with their attention to detail, the printing on the pin was so fuzzy.

(Although I wont be surprised if Lizziiee tells me that this style was created by Louis XIV.)

oh my jesus, are you picking at hairs or what...

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Yes, I was joking. Although not completely. I find it somewhat odd that a restaurant steeped in "traditional dining" would have a modern logo. It's not a criticism, just an observation. (Oh, if you're referring to the comment on the fuzzy print, that was all joking -- it's from the unfocused camera. The actual clothes pin is sharp and clear.)


Edited by Stone (log)

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Yes, I was joking.  Although not completely.  I find it somewhat odd that a restaurant steeped in "traditional dining" would have a modern logo.  It's not a criticism, just an observation.  (Oh, if you're referring to the comment on the fuzzy print, that was all joking -- it's from the unfocused camera.  The actual clothes pin is sharp and clear.)

Thank God. :biggrin: I've got me one of those kwel pins too. Ate there last December... It's sitting on my 'FL' shrine along with pics from the kitchen with T. Keller and in front of Bouchon. I love their modern art deco thing. It's part of the surreal charm of the place....

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Some friends went to FL last week. They were told that the kitchen did not have peas & carrots that night. Odd. But they praised the kitchen for deftly handling the no pork/no shellfish diner. And, since they only drank water, they won the prize for the lowest check in memory.

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Some friends went to FL last week.  They were told that the kitchen did not have peas & carrots that night.  Odd.  But they praised the kitchen for deftly handling the no pork/no shellfish diner.  And, since they only drank water, they won the prize for the lowest check in memory.

I think this marks the first time that I've heard of someone being denied at The French Laundry. You get the impression--from all of the incredible stories and press--that Thomas could whip up just about anything at a moment's notice. He's got to be the best chef out there with respect to pleasing the customer. I wonder what happened.

God, that guy must be under enormous pressure to perform.

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Some friends went to FL last week.  They were told that the kitchen did not have peas & carrots that night.  Odd.  But they praised the kitchen for deftly handling the no pork/no shellfish diner.  And, since they only drank water, they won the prize for the lowest check in memory.

I think this marks the first time that I've heard of someone being denied at The French Laundry. You get the impression--from all of the incredible stories and press--that Thomas could whip up just about anything at a moment's notice. He's got to be the best chef out there with respect to pleasing the customer. I wonder what happened.

Maybe they had a supplier problem. It happens.

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I've been a lurker here for quite a while, but finally decided to register and post.

To celebrate the 5th anneversary of our wedding, Racquel and I enjoyed a quiet weekend in Napa. The highlight was dinner Saturday at The French Laundry. What follows is my humble review of our dinner on March 22.

The quick review: Best. Meal. Ever.

The extended review: Racquel was dazzling in a navy dress accented with silver butterflies. I did my best not to look out of place in jacket and black pant. The exterior of the restaurant was stone and wood, and quiet in appearance. In fact, I didn't notice it at all when we drove past it earlier that day. (I did U-turn back for a look after Racquel pointed it out to me.) Rain had started to fall, so we went directly inside rather than tour the garden. I tried to peek through the kitchen window before we entered, hoping to catch a glimpse of Thomas Keller, but I was to learn later that he was out of town for the weekend. I was not worried about the quality of the food or service, but I was hoping to see him cooking, if only for a moment or two. The only real disappointment of the evening was being seated 30 minutes after our 8:45 reservation time. The maitre d' apologized for the wait, explaining that the couples there before us were enjoying a rather lengthy meal. I would be doing the same, so how could I complain? We sipped wine as we waited, and the kitchen sent out a small nibble to enjoy prior to being seated. A single-bite puff pastry with a bit of warm gruyère cheese in the center. It was a simple thing, really, and it lingered on the palate nicely.

We were seated at an intimate table by a window of one of the dining rooms. The inside of the restaurant was simple and elegant, themes which would continue throughout the night. The table and settings were crisp white, with the napkin held gently in a fan position by a wooden clothespin. Before I describe the food, I should mention the service, which was beyond exceptional. There is almost too much to mention. Settings were cleared and set between courses with fluidity and grace. Our every need was met before we had a chance to notice there was a need. At one point I excused myself from the table and returned to find a neatly fanned napkin. At various times during the evening we were visited by our head waiter, sommelier, servers, and another person I can only call an assistant waiter, who made settings appear on our table as if by magic. Never were we asked, "Is everything to your liking?" There was no need. Everyone was attentive, and somehow knew what we might want and when to bring it. Through all of this, I never felt watched. No one hovered near our table. In fact, there was a good deal of activity by the wait staff, and yet the room remained calm and quiet. Only once did I hear a member of the wait staff talking at another table. I could continue to pick examples of the quality of service, but that would not be sufficient. What made the service special was the overall feeling of welcome created in the union of all the small details, building something greater.

We wanted to taste different wines throughout the meal, so our sommelier, Keith Fergel, suggested several half-bottles of French wine to be served with the variety of courses. I had read about a young sommeliers award given to Mr. Fergel, and I congratulated him on the achievement. He was thankful, but his smile really widened when he explained that the award enables him to come back this year as a judge. Now the head sommelier at The French Laundry, he is obviously enjoying the opportunity.

The menu is composed of three smaller menus: The dinner menu, which presents five courses with selections in each course, the chef's tasting menu, which presents nine courses with a selection available for the second course, and a fixed vegetarian menu. Racquel decided to select from the dinner menu, while I wanted to sample as many dishes from the kitchen as I could, and so ordered the tasting menu. Racquel was brought extra tastes of various things to compensate for the discrepancy in the numbers of dishes we were served. Racquel's dishes looked and smelled wonderful, but I'll confine my comments to the dished placed before me.

We were first served something not printed on the menu, a small cone with black sesame seeds on the outside, and filled with sweet red onion crème fraîche. The cone is topped with a spoonful of salmon tartar and tiny bits of chive. It looks like a child's ice-cream cone. One bite, two bites, and gone. If you've had raw salmon in another form, you would appreciate this dish. The salmon was smooth and just a bit salty. The crème fraîche was sweet and light, contrasting with the crisp, toasted flavor of the cone. I smiled when it was presented, and I laughed when it was gone. I wonder whether the whimsy of this dish as a starter is intended to help any guests that might feel uneasy or intimidated to feel more at ease? Whatever the reason, it was delicious.

"Oysters and Pearls". Sabayon of Pearl Tapioca with Poached Mapleque Oysters and Osetra Caviar

My favorite dish of the night. I had never tasted caviar before, and I expected a heavy salt flavor. To the contrary, the salt was subtle, and complimented the creamy, buttery sauce in which the oysters were poached. The caviar also provided some contrast in texture and color with the tender oysters. Our assistant waiter brought a mother-of-pearl spoon to my setting before the dish arrived. I had heard about this, but I felt like a child laughing at what was to come. Let me tell you, I used that cute little spoon to retrieve every last drop of goodness from the bowl. This was served with a half-bottle of an M.V. Billecart-Salmon "Rose" Champagne. Have I become a snob? So be it. Caviar and champagne were made for each other.

For the second course, I was presented a choice between two dishes. The first was Hawaiian Hearts of Palm Salad with Truffle Coulis, a Confit of Field Rhubarb and Périgord Truffle Syrup. I chose:

Poached Moulard Duck Foie Gras en Terrine with Frisée and Black Périgord Truffles, Served with Toasted Brioche

I had never tasted chilled foie gras (outside of pâté), so I opted for the terrine. I loved the presentation, which started with a long rectangular dish. Slightly off-center to the right was the foie gras and truffle terrine. To the extreme right was the frisée and truffle salad. To the far left were small servings of ground pepper and fleur de sal. Drops of balsamic reduction were placed between the seasoning and the terrine. The brioche was served on a separate plate. The terrine was exceedingly rich and smoky, with alternating layers of light foie gras and dark truffles, and was to be spread on the brioche. I experimented with adding some of the seasoning, but I found the balsamic reduction balanced the richness of the foie gras wonderfully. The frisée and truffle salad also provided some balance to the dish. The glass of 2000 Domaine Bru-Baché Juragnon served with this course was sweet and accented the earthy tones of the dish.

Crispy Skin Filet of Atlantic Black Bass with Wilted Arrowleaf Spinach, Parsnip Purée and Saffron-Vanilla Sauce

For me, the saffron-vanilla sauce and parsnip purée were the highlight of this dish. Bright, sweet and subtle, I was shaking my head in disbelief at this sauce. This dish was more complex than I anticipated, with the browned and crispy skin lending just enough salt and fat to the tender meat. A single fork-full of this serving had the sauce/purée and skin on either side of the light meat and spinach. Tasting them individually was delicious, but tasting them as they combined was too much. I put my fork down and closed my eyes with the first bite. It was at this point that I knew my fears of the night not meeting my high expectations were unfounded. I laughed again when I realized that several more dishes were still to come. With this dish was poured a half-bottle of 1999 Domaine Ramonet Chassagne-Montrachet, which I found quiet and crisp.

Sweet Butter Poached Maine Lobster with Caramelized Fennel Bulb, Crystallized Fennel Chip and Sauce Noilly Pratt

Another comfort dish (lobster and drawn butter) with a twist. The lobster was sweet and tender. The sauce (which included vermouth, I believe) was smooth and while it was rich itself, somehow mellowed the body of the lobster (or perhaps the lobster mellowed the sauce). Two different types of richness? I'm laughing at myself, because I have no idea how this was done. I'm imagining a couple holding hands as they walk side by side. They married well. The fennel provided an interesting twist, lending sweetness and a pleasurable bitterness to the dish. The crystallized fennel chip atop the serving was light and provided a different measure of sweetness. I set the chip aside and ate it last, but I'm wondering now whether the crispiness of the chip would have changed the dish much had I broken a bit off with each bite.

Glazed Cloverdale Farms Rabbit Shoulder with Granny Smith Apple Coulis, Roasted Cippolini and Glazed Pearl Onions

This dish was perhaps the most rustic in concept. The rabbit was very tender, and its inherent game tones were in nice contrast with the sweet glaze and coulis. The cippolini and pearl onions rounded the country feel of the dish. While this was my least-favorite serving, it was also one that seemed to carry the most history, as if I were taken back in time and place to a empty countryside. With this dish we were served a 2000 Chateau Fortia Chateau-Neuf-du-Pape, which was full of spice and of medium body. It was delicious, but I found that it overpowered the rabbit somewhat. I enjoyed it very much with the next course.

Elysian Fields Farm Lamb Saddle Rôti Entier with a Cassoulet of Spring Pole Beans and Thyme-Infused Extra Virgin Olive Oil

The oil encircled a small handful of soft beans, which were topped with the sliced lamb. The lamb was tender and willing to be influenced by the rest of the dish. The beans were lovely as a buttery compliment and contrast in texture for the lamb. They were a dark cream color, and added some tooth to each bite. I forgot to taste the oil on its own. (To this point I had been using my finger to taste the liquids in each course so as to better understand the dish as a whole.) Still, the thyme was evident on the lamb, and the oil provided some roundness in the mouth.

Robiola Vecchia Valsassina with Eggplant Parmesan and Micro Arugula Salad

This cheese was soft and bold, the eggplant tender and mellow. A refreshing young green flavor was added through the salad. It's a bit esoteric, but sometimes I find it best to describe a dish according to a thought or feeling experienced while eating. For me, this dish was a foggy room with small, focused beams of light from above.

Spiced Poached Bartlett Pear Sorbet with Toasted Almond Financier

Such a refreshing way to begin desert! The financier was light and moist, and I thought I detected some sweet spice, but this might have been from the pear sorbet (which, being the perfect consistency, was just starting to melt). Pear was a delightful choice for sorbet; one I'd not tried before this night. It was subtle and elegant in taste and presentation.

Chocolate Velours with Valrhona Chocolate Sacher and Cocoa Syrup

Dark, and well balanced. Delicious on its own. While pouring a 2000 Domaine de Jau "Le Clos de Paulilles" Banyuls, our sommelier remarked about the wine, saying, "After this, chocolate will never taste the same." Oh, goodness, was he ever right. Before this I had not enjoyed wines with chocolate. The wine opened the chocolate, revealing a world of flavors I could not taste before. I will find this wine again.

Yet another desert was served, though this was not on the printed menu. Racquel was brought a small crème brûlée, while I was served a tiny cauldron of chilled almond custard. The texture was a delight. The custard was not overly sweet, and the almond was reserved. Somehow it remained light.

Mignardises

With coffee, our waiter placed on our table a small silver tray with bite-sized cookies. While Racquel and I stared at the tray, wondering what in the world we were supposed to do with more food, he presented another tray, seemingly out of thin air, filled with chocolate truffles and insisted we sample them. How could I possibly eat another bite? I was stuffed. I am happy to report the spirit triumphed! I sampled one of the tiny pastries, but the truffles would have to wait. I could eat no more.

It was very late when we left the restaurant, but the cool air was welcome. The experience far exceeded my expectations, and I hold out hope that we might dine here again someday.

Joseph


Joseph

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Joseph,

Glad you are no longer a lurker. Welcome and what a wonderful first post.

I am an avid fan of Thomas Keller and The French Laundry. I am so glad that your first experience exceeded your expectations.

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Sounds like the experience I had a couple months ago...but the rabbit wasn't up to Keller's par. I wrote 17 pages about the experience in fact....Keller came out to my table at 110am and we went back into the kitchen for pictures...Good to hear you had a great time too...

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WOW, what a description! Those salmon cones are legendary by now, classic Keller. I hope all your posts are as lavish and detailed as your first. What a standard to have to live up to. . . .

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Just out of curiosity....Are they still charging 135 for the nine course..or have they raised it again...

The tasting menu was $135. The dinner and vegetarian menus were each $115.

Joseph

P.S. I'd love to read your review, Chef/Writer Spencer. (May I call you Spencer?)


Edited by josephreese (log)

Joseph

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Just out of curiosity....Are they still charging 135 for the nine course..or have they raised it again...

The tasting menu was $135. The dinner and vegetarian menus were each $115.

Joseph

P.S. I'd love to read your review, Chef/Writer Spencer. (May I call you Spencer?)

If you have an email addy I can email it to you...Yes, Spencer is good...

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I've been to the French Laundry three times: July 5, 2000, March 29, 2001, and September 3, 2002. All three menus are framed on my dining room wall including the one with Keller's autograph on the March 29 menu. (It's all about finesse!)

Due to circumstances beyond my control, I lost my job in February 2003. Also due to circumstances beyond my control, I happen to have an inner group of wonderful friends who decided to cheer me up with a lunch reservation at FL for April 29th. I say I have friends beyond my control because I never dreamed they would do something like this, and if I could control it, I would have graciously declined. (Yeah, right...!)

So what can I expect for lunch, having been there for dinner three times?

Thanks!

-lav


Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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