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I noticed there's no meat grinder in the Modernist Gear Guide, so I was curious, what does everyone use?

I'm using a Kitchenaid Attachment, and while it sort of does the job, I'm not entirelty please with it and I wondered if anyone had any recommandations.

Thanks!

Ben

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I am bumping this thread. I am looking at buying a meat grinder and would like to hear the advice of others. There are two options, a Kitchenaid attachment or a stand alone electric. The all metal attachment costs about 90 Swiss Francs. An electric from bosch or Moullinex will run about 140chf. Any advantages or disadvantages between the two?

 

Thanks!

 

Dan


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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We "got by" with our Kitchenaid mixer meat grinding attachment, but weren't happy with it. I think it was a combination of not having much power and being a pain to clean afterward, but it's been a few years. i bought a dedicated meat grinder instead at a blow-out sale when a sporting goods store was closing. Unfortunately, I'm not sure we've used it enough to give a good assessment.


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1 hour ago, DanM said:

I am bumping this thread. I am looking at buying a meat grinder and would like to hear the advice of others. There are two options, a Kitchenaid attachment or a stand alone electric. The all metal attachment costs about 90 Swiss Francs. An electric from bosch or Moullinex will run about 140chf. Any advantages or disadvantages between the two?

 

Thanks!

 

Dan

How much meat do you think you'll be grinding?  If it's a minimal amount, then I think you'd be ok with the KitchenAid attachment.  We grind up quite a bit of venison every year, so we have a Tor Rey model # m-12 and it's 3/4 HP.  We also have a smaller LEM grinder if you're looking for more get-up-and-go than the KitchenAid but not as much as a commercial type.

 

This thread from June of this year might be helpful for you, too 

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I do not grind a lot of meat, but like to have the ability to when needs arise. I have the KitchenAid attachment and find that it does a fine job. I do make sure the meat to be ground is very cold / semi-frozen. As far as cleanup, I simply take it apart, rinse it under hot water and put all the parts in the dishwasher. My space is limited and the idea of having a separate machine to bring up from the basement has little appeal to me. If I was to start hunting deer again, I would probably change my attitude and approach, but, the KitchenAid is fine for me currently.

HC

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I am going to be parting with one of my meat grinders.  I sold the big Northland one several years ago to my friend, Sam the Egg man, who is now raising game birds for the L.A. hotel and upscale restaurants.  

He make some kind of special food that has to be ground and baked or dried  and ground again so he needed the heavy duty one that I hadn't used much for  years. When I did catering I ground ALL of the meats I used to make sure the quality was to my standards.

 

I still have three smaller ones but will have to retrieve them from storage and see which one works best.  One is a Rival, one is a Maverick (I think) And I forget the name of the other one.  


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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8 hours ago, HungryChris said:

I do not grind a lot of meat, but like to have the ability to when needs arise. I have the KitchenAid attachment and find that it does a fine job. I do make sure the meat to be ground is very cold / semi-frozen. As far as cleanup, I simply take it apart, rinse it under hot water and put all the parts in the dishwasher. My space is limited and the idea of having a separate machine to bring up from the basement has little appeal to me. If I was to start hunting deer again, I would probably change my attitude and approach, but, the KitchenAid is fine for me currently.

HC

 

I agree.  The KitchenAid plastic attachment does fine by me.  They say not to put the KitchenAid meat grinder blades in the dishwasher but I have yet to have a problem.

 

Some years ago a chef friend said she would never have a meat grinder that was not refrigerated.  Your mileage may vary.

 

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I use the KitchenAid attachment at home. It's good enough for the amount of use it gets. I don't do enough grinding at home to justify a separate machine for the purpose. One thing the KitchenAid attachment is not good for is stuffing sausages. I did that exactly once, said never again and bought a dedicated 5 lb. stuffer. 

Edit: forgot to mention, there are aftermarket grinding plate sets available on ebay for the KitchenAid attachment that give a much better variety of grind size options. Quality is good (at least, for the set I have) and they're not even expensive.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I got mine @  Cabela's    --was a black Friday deal/  this thing has 1/2 hr power motor.  Easy to use and easy to clean


Its good to have Morels

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