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[Modernist Cuisine at Home] Coconut Noodles


Anonymous Modernist 5246
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Just made the coconut noodles from MCAH, page 123 of the kitchen manual and while not a complete disaster it was close. While the recipe did not appear to be out of order based on others in the book, upon trying to roll it out it was obvious that there was too much oil in it.

The recipe was followed to a "T" using two scales to get accurate weights. After an hour in the fridge under vacuum one could see oil seeping out of the dough and into the bag. I was able to roll a small portion of the dough, getting my pasta machine slicked with oil as were the surrounding counter tops. I cut them into fettucine and after a 30 second boil, it was again apparent that something was not quite right as the noodles did not hold together very well and broke apart.

Just wondering if anyone else has attempted these?

I will make them again, but I am planning on swapping the weights for the Vital wheat gluten and the oil, i.e. 53 g of Vital wheat gluten for 7.5 g of oil.

Any help would be appreciated.

RED

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  • 2 weeks later...

The amount of gluten and oil are accurate despite how different they may be from other variations (except for the barley recipe, which has the same proportions). Because of the different properties of coconut flour, the base recipe had to be adjusted accordingly (as did the barley recipe, for the same reason). We found with this formula that the barley and coconut noodles were closer in resemblance to the original Egg Noodle recipe.

There are some things to keep in mind when developing this dough. It is important to use a mixer with a dough hook attachment and to develop the gluten for about 4 minutes on high before adding the oil. At this point, you can proceed to add oil a little at a time. Once the oil has been incorporated, turn the mixer to high and develop the dough for another 5 minutes. Depending on the type (brand) of double-zero flour you‚’re using, or if you‚’re substituting all-purpose flour, you may need to add up to 10 g of water to form the dough properly.

If you pull a vacuum on the dough immediately after it forms, more oil will leach out. Therefore, it is advised to either chill the dough before vacuum sealing it, or simply wrap the dough in plastic wrap, and allow it to rest in the refrigerator. Some residual oil will still escape from the dough, but this is fine. We like to use a good amount of flour to dust the dough when working with it. We also flour our rolling pin and flatten the dough just enough to fit it through the widest setting on the pasta machine. Flour the dough again, if necessary, to avoid sending oil through the roller, and be sure to dust the pasta machine with a good amount of flour in order to minimize sticking.

I hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Aaron Verzosa

Research & Development Chef

Modernist Cuisine

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  • 2 months later...

Whoever made this "Coconut Noodles" recipe must be having an excellent taste in modern cuisine. I read this post last week and tried to make it. I won't say it was up to the mark but yeah, it was superbly delicious I must say. Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful recipe with us. I recommend those who gave up preparing coconut noodles, to try again. It worth the effort! sf-smile.gif

survival food storage

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