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Pressure Cooker: Questions for the home cook


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I'm ready to buy a pressure cooker and I'm looking at the Kuhn-Rikon Duromatics. I'm not sure which size to get, though. I'm mostly cooking for two, but I like having leftovers, and I'm concerned a 4-qt one won't be large enough for larger proteins or stock (which, in reality, I probably won't be making all that often). I'm leaning towards one of these three:

http://www.amazon.com/Kuhn-Rikon-3043-Duromatic-6-3-Quart/dp/B00009A9XT/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1326995636&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Kuhn-Rikon-3916-Duromatic-Pressure/dp/B0000Y73UQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1326995628&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Kuhn-Rikon-3342-Stainless-Steel-Pressure/dp/B00004R8ZE/ref=sr_1_3?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1326995628&sr=1-3

Because they all look fairly similar, this is rapidly becoming the most difficult decision I've ever had to make. Does anyone have any advice?

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 8 months later...

Did you buy one yet? Why not get the R set 5 and 2L that share the same pressure cooking top. For stocks you can make them really concentrated (easier for storing, too).

I fill the pressure cooker to almost the max fill line (that's 2/3 of the capacity) with bones, veggies and spices and then only add just enough water to cover.

This makes a 2x concentrated stock. Just freeze in disposable cups. Then add the same amount of water when using (or not for a super strong flavor).

Ciao,

L

P.S. For pressure cooking legumes, grain and any other foods that expand, the pressure cooker should not be filled more than HALF capacity.

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The advice about the Kuhn-Rikon Duo R set 5 L and 2 L sharing a top seems really good, unless the newer "Top Model" valve is better. Here is a Modernist Cuisine link that seems to endorse the latter, in contract to the Gear links on this site: http://modernistcuisine.com/re…..risotto-2/ Perhaps including a link to that particular model was inadvertent. Anyone have experience with the two types of Kuhn-Rikon valves?

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Get the newer one - Yes the older Kuhn-Rikon units work well but even the Swiss update from time to time.

Personally I very much agree with LFMichard's comments get the biggest one that fits in your kitchen.

for example you can steam broccoli in one min on high steam. Try fitting enough broccoli for 6 in a small unit. I have the 12 ltr one and do not regret it at all.

Mike Macdonald Calgary

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Modernist Cuisine at Home has many detailed recipes involving a pressure cooker but never says what size is needed. It is not easy to tell, because of ingredients like chopped bones that are not of a certain volume. Has anyone figured out what size is needed for these recipes? There are photographs on pp. 29-33, p. 113 and other pages that are all Kuhn-Rikon: some may be 5 liter and some 7, since they always seem to have the long handle and those are the two sizes.

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I have not seen the new book, yet. But I looked at a table of contents and there appears to be a whole sub-chapter on pressure cookers in Chapter 2. You mean size is not addressed at all there?

http://eater.com/archives/2012/10/25/modernist-cuisine-at-home-preview.php

The "kitchen" photos of the above I see both the 2.5L and the 5L - which is the Kuhn Rikon Duo set - whether it's representative of what they actually used in the cooking lab I can't say.

Best to wait for them to answer that!

Ciao,

L

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I can't really tell the size via the ingredients because the illustration is so beautifully Photoshopped. My best guess is that the pressure cooker in the cross-section is 5L (judging from the 1:2 ratio of the handle height to the base height).

Ciao,

L

P.S. There are several technical errors in the descriptions pointing to the pressure cooker - nothing egregious - they are pointing and describing features that the pictured model does not have. Probably, they had originally meant to use the a cooker cross-section from another manufacturer but swapped out the photos without updating the descriptions.

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I share as much of my knowledge, research and findings freely to help everyone get pressure cooking. But, a detailed technical review and correction of Modernist Cuisine @Home should not be conducted in the forums - or from a PDF preview.

When I posted concerns about one of their videos on their blog, it was not well received.

http://modernistcuisine.com/2011/11/new-recipe-garlic-confit/ (see comments)

If Modernist Cuisine expresses interest, I will gladly detail the errors in the illustration and safety concerns from a recipe a friend scanned and emailed me from the new book. This will ensure that the MC team can make the appropriate corrections in future re-prints and update their errata file.

Ciao,

L

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Ok are their any reasons other than cost not to get the larger sized Kuhn-Rikon yes I can see not using a larger canning pressure cooker for every day use but the larger Kuhn-Rikon is really easy to use and something I would recommend highly. I only have one pressure cooker and thats all I plan to have. Unless I learn something that changes my mind.

Mike Macdonald Calgary

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Dave Arnold was just talking about pressure cooker size on the Cooking Issues podcast.

Basically he said to get the largest one you can, with the limitation that the bottom has to fit your stove's burner size.

For instance, Kuhn Rikon sells pressure stock pots and pressure cookers. Both do the same job, but the pressure stock pots are much wider and need a larger burner to prevent hotspots and uneven cooking.

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Dave Arnold was just talking about pressure cooker size on the Cooking Issues podcast.

Basically he said to get the largest one you can, with the limitation that the bottom has to fit your stove's burner size.

For instance, Kuhn Rikon sells pressure stock pots and pressure cookers. Both do the same job, but the pressure stock pots are much wider and need a larger burner to prevent hotspots and uneven cooking.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Mweinstein,

It depends on the kind of recipe it is. If it's a steamy or braising-type recipe, no need to increase the cooking liquid. If it is a stewy boiling type recipes, you can increase without changes providing you don't exceed 1/2 capacity of the cooker with legumes and grains or 2/3 with everything else.

If it is a short-cooking recipe, say risotto, the cooking time will need to be shortened - the cooker will take longer to reach pressure and the contents are still cooking during that time.

If you can tell me more about the recipe you want to increase, I can give you more specific things to keep in mind!

Ciao,

L

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Mweinstein,

It depends on the kind of recipe it is. If it's a steamy or braising-type recipe, no need to increase the cooking liquid. If it is a stewy boiling type recipes, you can increase without changes providing you don't exceed 1/2 capacity of the cooker with legumes and grains or 2/3 with everything else.

If it is a short-cooking recipe, say risotto, the cooking time will need to be shortened - the cooker will take longer to reach pressure and the contents are still cooking during that time.

If you can tell me more about the recipe you want to increase, I can give you more specific things to keep in mind!

Ciao,

L

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