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Anonymous Modernist 3117

[Modernist Cuisine] I noticed an interesting typo: how to make zero calorie recipes

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Hi to all the team, and thanks for a most fantastic book

Juste one little thing, I noticed a small typo : if you look at the table on the top left corner of page 357 (units conversion) you will notice that the conversion factor from Joules to Kcal is expressed as... multiply by 0.000

Does this imply that to make calories dissapear from my meals all I have to do is to convert Kcal to Joules back and forth, to end up with a zero calorie dinner?

My guess is that the correct value should be 0.239. Irrelevant anyway since the concept of calories is an obsolete and inadequate method of evaluating the nutrition potential of food.

sf-confused.gif

Cheers from Belgium

Eric

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To clarify, this error appears on page 5·XXXVIII. The value in the third row of the "Common Conversion Values" table was incorrectly truncated. It should read:

J kcal 0.000239

Thanks for pointing out the error.

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