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Curing/fermenting egg yolks


Franci
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I would like to cure/ferment some egg yolks.  I would really appreciate the one of you with experience in this regard if you could share your outcomes.

 

So far, I cooked some egg yolks SV at 65 C for 45 minutes, chilled and buried in miso. I should have used some cheesecloth but I ran out, but this made a big difference because the yolks get very sticky and by using the cloth they would have retained the shape much better.

 

eggs sous vide00003 (2).jpeg

 

After 6 weeks in the fridge, this is what I scooped out

 

uova al miso 2.jpeg

 

I've wrapped each yolk in cheesecloth and hanged on a skewer and put back in the fridge. I'll take them out in 20 days, hoping they are dry enough to grate.

 

image(3).jpeg

 

I read the topic on this blog.

 

And what to do with the leftover miso? Toss it?

 

image(2).jpeg

 

This guy here fermented his yolks for 6 months!

 

And yolk cured with salt? It would be a crazy idea to shape into a log and cure to have a block to grate as bottarga?

Edited by Franci (log)
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Yes, they don't look really appetizing. I think using a light miso and layering with cheesecloth to retain shape would help.

 

here some pictures of a cleaner yolk cut in half...a little better

 

uova miso 300001.jpeg

 

uova miso 300002.jpeg

 

It tastes a little bit like a salted yolk with miso flavor. Texture a little like very very fresh bottarga

Edited by Franci (log)
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Kudos, 

Franci

 

for pushing the envelope out. a lot. 

 

I have no Idea what's going on here, but Im pleased to learn from you.

 

this isnt'  cannelloni al forno

 

is it ?  I made that in my day going to the North End  ( BOS ) and enjoyed discussions w various Butchers there

 

this is   ' pasta in Semolina en le Refridge  for some time '  taken to the x's degress

 

Im very pleased you are on the Outer Edge !

 

Happy Cooking !

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Dcarch, I'm glad if you try. Meanwhile, I'll report back on these in 20 days.

Thanks Blether, that is interesting as well. I'll add to the list.

 

I also remember the egulleter Avaserfi curing some eggs in salt and sugar, maybe I should pm him.

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I recently did my first salt-cured yolks. Buried in salt for 48 hours, then rinsed and dried. The texture is pretty much like a gumdrop, which makes it hard to grate; I've previously seen them frozen after curing to make them firmer for grating. I recently saw that there's a process outlined in the book Charcuteria: The Soul of Spain for cured yolks that involves drying them out in a charcuterie curing chamber, but unfortunately I don't have one of those!

 

As far as the miso, I would think you could reuse it for marinades or the like - miso-cured fish, for example - but I probably wouldn't put it in soup.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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  • 8 months later...

Well, I'm reporting 9 months later.

Just for pure LAZINESS, I left my yolk in the fridge until now. They taste pretty good, light taste of miso, salty but not too much easy to grate. Hopefully I didn't poison myself  :rolleyes: 

 

IMG_1846.JPG

 

 

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I know that as a kid in korea my grandmother would preserve the eggs either in soy sauce, korean miso, or gochujang (homemade). I don't remember the miso one or the gochujang one much, but the soy sauce! I  loved raw egg on hot rice with sesame oil, soy sauce (green onions etc if i wanted to change up from the base recipe), and if we were lucky we got the preserved raw egg yolk in soy sauce too. I remember her fermenting a lot of things in miso, and especially gochujang. I wonder if you could do that with the store bought gochujang? 

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  • 4 years later...

After @Margaret Pilgrim brought up this topic yesterday, I decided to try these quick (4 hour) Miso-Cured Eggs that Samin Nosrat made with Nancy Singleton Hachisu in her Netflix show. That recipe, from Hachisu’s book, Preserving the Japanese Way is available online here, with process photos here.  I boiled the eggs for 7 minutes instead of the specified 8.  

One egg wrapped in miso, the other waiting:

1881077587_IMG_1100(1).thumb.jpg.6c1d613406cd5ed60209588ec8d121d6.jpg

 

As served on some Japanese-style potato salad:

24988473_IMG_1103(1).thumb.jpg.97f92bb081f61767c7909e964a51a7ae.jpg

 

I'd like to try the egg yolks that get a longer cure/ferment next but this was quick and easy and they made an excellent addition to the potato salad. 

 

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