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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
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David - what temperature are you cooking the sugar to? The only time i got a very stiff marshmallow was when i thought i might have overheated my sugar. The other times i got to only 136 or 138, and that gave me a very pourable marshmallow. Those were also fruit puree marshmallows, which might make a difference in consistency.

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David - what temperature are you cooking the sugar to? The only time i got a very stiff marshmallow was when i thought i might have overheated my sugar.  The other times i got to only 136 or 138, and that gave me a very pourable marshmallow.  Those were also fruit puree marshmallows, which might make a difference in consistency.

NightScotsman gives 240F and Peter Greweling gives 252F.

The first batch went to 245F and I was going for 240 on the second batch but got distracted and pulled it off the stove at 250.

The recipie is Greweling's, but it's pretty close to a plain vanilla version of NightScotsman's. It's pretty stiff coming out of the mixing bowl. I think next time I'll try keeping it warm (but not melted) with a heat gun during the mixing and see if that helps.

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Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you). I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg. Then I dipped them. They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.

I took pictures:

gallery_52844_5147_3918.jpg

Patty

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Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you).  I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg.  Then I dipped them.  They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.

How much puree did you use? Was it equal substitution for the the water?

Could you list the recipe please? These things look and sound delicious! :wub: Very nice job!

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Thank you!

I use a different recipe from Nightscotsman's legendary one that most folks here use, but I subbed out most of the water for pumpkin puree - just a bit of water to bloom the gelatine.

I posted the recipe on recipe gullet: Recipe Gullet - Patris's Pumpkin Spice Marshmallows

I've never written a recipe from scratch before, so please let me know if anything needs clarifying.

Enjoy!

Patty

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  • 2 weeks later...

I want to top a batch of marshmallows with caramelized cocoa nibs. My question(s)- At what point should I put the nibs on top of the marshmallows? If I plop the slab on top of a layer of nibs, won't there be cornstarch/sugar all over them? If I wait until they are cut, what's to keep the nibs from falling off the marshmallows?? Thanks for your advice!

Edited by apronstrings (log)
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Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you).  I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg.  Then I dipped them.  They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.

I took pictures:

gallery_52844_5147_3918.jpg

Those look totally amazing!

In the past when i've tried to coat mine in chocolate the m/m started to melt, what would be the best way to do it?

Also my batch set really well but even after coating with potato starch they were quite sticky - should i have beat them a bit more or is it more to do with cooking the sugar to a higher temp (i followed nightwatchmans recipe)

xx

so much to do so little time!

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Thank you!

I've never had a big problem with the marshmallows melting - perhaps your chocolate is too warm, or you're letting them sit in the chocolate too long? Or are you putting several marshmallows into the chocolate at once and taking them out one at a time? I just drop one in the chocolate, flip it upside down with my dipping fork to get it coated, then knock the excess chocolate off and slide it off the fork onto my wax-papered cookie sheet.

As far as coating them goes, for myself I find a mixture of half cornstarch and half powdered sugar works really well. I cut them into cubes, toss them in that to coat them thoroughly, then knock off the excess in a strainer. Mine haven't really gotten sticky. I think if you're cooking to 240ish, the sugar temp shouldn't be an issue, and Nightscotsman's recipe gets rave reviews from just about everyone who tries it. Sorry I couldn't be of more help!

Patty

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I want to top a batch of marshmallows with caramelized cocoa nibs. My question(s)- At what point should I put the nibs on top of the marshmallows? If I plop the slab on top of a layer of nibs, won't there be cornstarch/sugar all over them? If I wait until they are cut, what's to keep the nibs from falling  off the marshmallows?? Thanks for your advice!

i would either fold some in at the end of the whipping/cooling process...or if you're dipping in chocolate, i would sprinkle some on top of the chocolate before it sets. every other scenario seems a bit dubious.

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Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?

so much to do so little time!

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Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?

glucose and corn syrup are pretty much interchangeable in this type of recipe...as a matter of fact, glucose has less water than corn syrup.

i don't think this is the reason for your stickiness. could be humidity or could be not cooking to the proper temperature.

if you're dipping in chocolate, your chocolate shouldn't ever be hot enough to melt a marshmallow...are you attempting to coat the 'mallows and allow them to set up like a candy? if that's the case, check out the p&b index for information on tempering chocolate. well worth the extra effort.

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What is the shelf life of the homemade marshmallows? I want to make some for a holiday show but not sure how far ahead I can make them. I will be dipping them in chocolate and sealing them in cello bags. Should they be stored at room temp. or refrigerate for a longer shelf life? Any suggestions? :hmmm:

Pat

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Coating the marshmallows will greatly extend their shelf life. I've kept chocolate-covered marshmallows for a few weeks with no detriment to the quality.

Be sure you keep them away from the sun, heat, and humidity.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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i've kept the marshmallow recipe (posted on the marshmallow thread) for at least a month with no problems. obviously, they're better the first couple of weeks after making them, but they last a long time. as etalanian noted, enrobed, they'll last even longer.

DO NOT however, put them in the fridge. especially with chocolate coating...too much humidity. remember that sugar is hygroscopic (absorbs moisture). so you can not only get sticky marshmallows, but if they're already dipped, you can get sugar bloom on the chocolate.

frozen would be another story though. there's discussion about vacuum sealing chocolates and freezing them to no ill effect. that could be an option for you. you have to allow two days for the thawing process...one day in the fridge and one day on the counter with the wrap still on it to avoid condensation on the surface of your candies...then you can open and serve.

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Totally agree on the chocolate coating keeping them fresher longer. I have managed to keep enrobed marshmallows for as long as 8-10 weeks with little deterioration in texture or flavor. I had been having issues with re-crystallization after a week or 2, but I started adding about 3/4 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the sugar (or for fruit flavors, a scant 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid). That has extended the shelf life considerably for me.

Patty

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I included some in last years Christmas packages. One recipient was too lazy to go pick up her box and it came back. I didn't open it right away and when I did the marshmallows had spoiled. I'd say a shelf life of a few weeks given good conditions.

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Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?

glucose and corn syrup are pretty much interchangeable in this type of recipe...as a matter of fact, glucose has less water than corn syrup.

i don't think this is the reason for your stickiness. could be humidity or could be not cooking to the proper temperature.

if you're dipping in chocolate, your chocolate shouldn't ever be hot enough to melt a marshmallow...are you attempting to coat the 'mallows and allow them to set up like a candy? if that's the case, check out the p&b index for information on tempering chocolate. well worth the extra effort.

:biggrin:

Woo Hoo Success!!!!

I'm just about the happiest person who ever made Marshmallows

I managed to coat them in chocolate not all over, just the tops but they came out lovely

I also coated the remainder in potato starch - no stickiness

Thanks to everyone that gave advice - truly sound!

Now if only I could post pics of them ... :unsure:

so much to do so little time!

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