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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
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wanting to make coconut marshmallows, but not with toasted coconut on the outside...what if I add cream of coconut while beating the hot syrup mixture..or adding cream of coconut with the gelatin???? Anyone see a problem with either method?

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when I made them I used a can of coconut milk in the gelatin to bloom cut back the same amt on the total water as what was in the can..it then poured the hot syrup over it whipped it for 10 min or so and it was the most fantastic soft marshmallow I made ...everyone loved it ..I put the coconut on top but you certianly dont have to

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Hey --

Was wondering if anyone out there had tried making an extra fruity batch, by substituting extra strained fruit puree for the water used in the blooming part of the recipe? Think I will give this a try but was curious if anyone else had...

Emily

yes and it came out really wonderful! I used a cup half of it in the bloom and half in the sugar syrup and it worked out great

I would love to make PEEPS!!!!

When you add the half cup of fruit puree to the syrup, do you decrease the amount of water?

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Hi Sarah --

I took hummingbird's advice and went for it an extra fruity batch -- yes, I subbed all of the water in the sugar syrup for a strained strawberry puree... And subbed all the water in the bloom for more strained puree... So basically subbed all the water in the whole recipe for strained puree and the result was amazing -- a serious strawberry burst in the mouth!

Emily

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  • 1 month later...

I've thoroughly enjoyed reading this thread over the past several months and have become pretty adept at making the little guys. A couple of tips. When you pull the marshmallow creme from the bowl, use a spatula and/or your hands and have the water tap running to keep the spatula and your hands wet.

I have recorded today's MANGO MARSHMALLOWS preparation for my Cinco de Mango party and have uploaded the videos of the process to youtube.

I am currently loading the five or six parts ofvideo instructions for making MANGO MARSHMALLOWS. As soon as finished, I will post the link to youtube.

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I finally made a batch of fruity ones and they got rave reviews from the family, so I guess I did OK!

I used the mixed berry blend from Costco (blueberries, raspberries & marionberries), thawed, pureed & strained. I used the puree for all the water in the recipe; in the gelatin and in the fruit syrup. The berry flavor was really good!.

Next time I am going to add a wee bit of water to the gelatin first then the puree and continue as I did. They didn't come out as fluffy as I like them to be but everyone else said I was nuts and that they were great (guess like everyone else who cooks/bakes, I'm never satisfied and think I can always do better).

I then melted/tempered some dark chocolate and dipped the tops. Since I don't have the money for primo chocolate (and for 3 non-discerning kiddies), I have found in my local store, WinCo, that they sell blocks o'chocolate and they seem to work nicely for my marshmallows. And at $2 something a pound I can afford it.

Final grade on my first batch: YUMMMMM-OOOOOO!! :wub:

Next batch, chocolate overkill for my son's teacher for teacher appreciation day next week. I am thinking chocolate ones drizzled with chocolate and some vanilla ones completely dipped in chocolate but that sounds boring.

ANY SUGGESTIONS???

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CINCO DE MANGO MANGO MARSHMALLOWS!

Here is the link to youtube. I've pasted five parts and will follow up with the cornstarch/confectioner's sugar coating and the slicing of the marshmallows next:

http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=JayPFrancis

You should be able to see all of the five clips by accessing my youtube name: JayPFrancis

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  • 4 weeks later...

All of you who are making those wonderful fruity variations, are you leaving out the orange flower water and to no noticeable effect? Thought I'd try my hand at these but don't have any orange flower water, not sure if my usual store has the stuff.

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All of you who are making those wonderful fruity variations, are you leaving out the orange flower water and to no noticeable effect?  Thought I'd try my hand at these but don't have any orange flower water, not sure if my usual store has the stuff.

I have never used the orange flower water.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I only use the orange flower water with the strawberries .had not even thought about it but I bet you could use it in other flavoris.....I am so thrilled with this combo I use orange flower water in several strawberry dishes

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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awwwright... I made these yesterday subbing all but 1/2 cup water with the strawberry puree. But I wasn't sure about cooking some of the puree as a fruit syrup, so I dumped all the puree (1 1/4 cups) plus 1/4 cup water into the mixer with the gelatin and only cooked the syrup with 1/4 water.

So my questions are:

are the li'l suckers supposed to just disappear in your mouth like candy floss? It's beyond melting in the mouth - it's like eating marshmallow foam - they are really really soft, fluffy to the extreme. I assume this is not really the texture they're meant to be. Should I be increasing the amount of gelatin (I used 28g) ?

And, can I reduce the amount of syrup (someone upthread mentioned this) or sugar (which will automatically reduce the syrup) without ill effects? Or will this throw the rest of the recipe off balance? I know marshmallows are sweet, but these were scarily sweet - and it wasn't the strawberries, because the frozen fruit, after being pureed, was exceedingly bland.

My marshmallow-loving kids won't eat them :huh: so of course, in true eG spirit, I am determined to get it right! (ummm, I KNEW there was a reason I'd avoided clicking on this thread until yesterday) :raz:

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I'm guessing here, but I think you are using 160 bloom gelatin (that's the only one I've been able to find at Sun Lik...haven't bothered with the others though), whereas in the US, it's 210 bloom.

You should be using 36g gelatin, not 28g.

ETA: Did you add a little lemon juice to your puree to brighten up the flavors?

Edited by miladyinsanity (log)

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I'm guessing here, but I think you are using 160 bloom gelatin (that's the only one I've been able to find at Sun Lik...haven't bothered with the others though), whereas in the US, it's 210 bloom.

You should be using 36g gelatin, not 28g.

ETA: Did you add a little lemon juice to your puree to brighten up the flavors?

gosh thanks May. It's never occured to me there might be different types of gelatin. I just bought the standard stuff from Cold Storage - not even the usual stuff in sachets which I usually use, as they were all out. So, 36g of our stuff? And, I'll try a twist of lemon.

Any other input also very welcome please!

Now to my next question: short of binning the lot, what do I do with a PILE of strawberry marshmallow fluff? :hmmm:

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I'm guessing here, but I think you are using 160 bloom gelatin (that's the only one I've been able to find at Sun Lik...haven't bothered with the others though), whereas in the US, it's 210 bloom.

You should be using 36g gelatin, not 28g.

ETA: Did you add a little lemon juice to your puree to brighten up the flavors?

gosh thanks May. It's never occured to me there might be different types of gelatin. I just bought the standard stuff from Cold Storage - not even the usual stuff in sachets which I usually use, as they were all out. So, 36g of our stuff? And, I'll try a twist of lemon.

Any other input also very welcome please!

Now to my next question: short of binning the lot, what do I do with a PILE of strawberry marshmallow fluff? :hmmm:

I don't know about the gelatin--I've been getting the powdered silver gelatin from Sun Lik or Phoon Huat in the little bottles.

Make Smores? I imagine they'd caramelise the same way.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Now to my next question:  short of binning the lot, what do I do with a PILE of strawberry marshmallow fluff?  :hmmm:

On ice cream, mixed in with fondant for cream centers for chocolates, mixed with other stuff to lighten the other stuff up?

Try mixing about 3 cups of it with about 1/2 to 3/4 cup lemon juice. Freeze in your ice cream maker. Serve with fresh sliced berries.

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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Now to my next question:  short of binning the lot, what do I do with a PILE of strawberry marshmallow fluff?  :hmmm:

I wonder how it would be if you piped it onto cupcakes, then put it under the broiler for a bit to caramelize it. Or skip the cupcakes, and just smear some on bread or cookies! Korova cookies, to make something like a wagon wheel!

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I piped my last marshmallows (curry) and man!, I wouldn't wish that torture on anyone! If I were going to pipe again, I would try to whip less so they start off softer, and just assume that I would be cutting the marshmallow when it was time to stop it flowing.

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Success at last! (I gave away the last lot to some less discerning folks :biggrin: )

I made a 1/4 batch of vanilla marshmallows with 12g of (160 bloom) gelatin (which would mean 48g for a full batch vs nightscotsman's original 28g specification :blink: ) but got marshmallow fluff again.

Then I made a 1/3 batch of cocoa marshmallows using 24g of gelatin. It worked! Yes they were somewhat dense but that's fine since our only marshmallow experience is the rather dense storebought kind. I don't find the chocolate flavour intense enough though, so might increase the cocoa next time and try swirling it in at the end as Mcauliflower did.

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I haven't made any Marshmallows since the holidays but I am going to try to bring some up north for the 4th of July and need to start playing with flavors - so far I've only done vanilla and peppermint.

One of our new favorite treats is strawberries soaked in balsamic vinegar with a little sugar and black pepper. If I made a puree of this mixture, do you think I could use it the same way as a straight strawberry puree?

Hubby is also requesting cardamom marshmallows - I'm thinking my best bet is to put cardamom pods in with the syrup to steep.

Hmm, maybe this would be a good way to use up some of the chocolate mint that is taking over our garden.

Isn't it great that such a simple treat can be made so many ways?

"Vegetables aren't food. Vegetables are what food eats."

--

food.craft.life.

The Lunch Crunch - Our daily struggle to avoid boring lunches

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One of our new favorite treats is strawberries soaked in balsamic vinegar with a little sugar and black pepper.  If I made a puree of this mixture, do you think I could use it the same way as a straight strawberry puree?

I don't see why not.

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I am hoping to make strawberry marshmallows tomorrow. I like things sweet/tart. I will dip the tops in chocolate.

What do you think about adding some "sour salt", which is pure citric acid. How much do you think in one batch, and when would I add it?

Those of you that use lemon juice, when and how?

Thanks!

-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

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I am hoping to make strawberry marshmallows tomorrow. I like things sweet/tart. I will dip the tops in chocolate.

What do you think about adding some "sour salt", which is pure citric acid. How much do you think in one batch, and when would I add it?

Those of you that use lemon juice, when and how?

Thanks!

Hi Becca,

I would think that the best way to add the citric acid would be to add it to the water that you use to bloom the gelatin. I don't know how much you should use, but for a point of reference, there is 1g of citric acid in 20ml (4 teaspoons) of lemon juice, so 1g of citric acid should give you the equivalent acidic boost that you'd get from 4t of lemon juice.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I am hoping to make strawberry marshmallows tomorrow. I like things sweet/tart. I will dip the tops in chocolate.

What do you think about adding some "sour salt", which is pure citric acid. How much do you think in one batch, and when would I add it?

Those of you that use lemon juice, when and how?

Thanks!

Hi Becca,

I would think that the best way to add the citric acid would be to add it to the water that you use to bloom the gelatin. I don't know how much you should use, but for a point of reference, there is 1g of citric acid in 20ml (4 teaspoons) of lemon juice, so 1g of citric acid should give you the equivalent acidic boost that you'd get from 4t of lemon juice.

I second adding the lemon juice / citric acid to the gelatin mix.

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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