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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
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I love the Goya fruit pulp and as I said have been using it for years ..the mango is the only one I am not always thrilled with ..sometimes the flavor shines and sometimes it is blah ....other than that the fruits are always good ..try the soursop/guayabana if you can find it ..it makes a lovely white marshmallow with the nicest tropical flavor..(it is one of my very favorite tropical fruits!) ..I want to try the mamey as a marshmallow ...I bet it is good!

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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what other flavors besides mint and lime do you think could be colored green for St Patrick's day? any ideas?

ps I have been using 1/2 tsp Wilton icing color jell good success ...it is just enough color to make it look like the flavor with out being to intense ...

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Hi Joni --

I used black raspberries from our property, so no store to send you to I'm afraid... Do try dipping in chocolate though -- now that I've had them that way I can't imagine them any other! The chocolate is key!

Emily

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what other flavors besides mint and lime do you think could be colored green for St Patrick's day? any ideas?

ps I have been using 1/2 tsp Wilton icing color jell good success ...it is just enough color to make it look like the flavor with out being to intense ...

You could dip vanilla marshmallows in white chocolate that's been tinted a pale green; or dip the lime ones into plain white chocolate and then into tinted coconut...

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I've done a pear buttercream for a past client, using the Perfect Puree pear - but it is a pale yellow/gold, not at all green so I'd go for tinting it if you do it. Pear is such an elusive flavor to capture - I used practically the entire bottle of puree and wished I'd had some compound.

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what other flavors besides mint and lime do you think could be colored green for St Patrick's day? any ideas?

ps I have been using 1/2 tsp Wilton icing color jell good success ...it is just enough color to make it look like the flavor with out being to intense ...

Sweet fresh, er... well frozen peas would lend themselves wonderfully for green marshmallows.

Sweet wasabi!

Delicate kiwi complete with those cute crunchy little seeds.

yum!

edited to add:

margarita marshmallows! Lime-aide based with tequilla poured into the whipping fluff. And salted dusting powder...

>> relatedly, you could make up margarita jello shots with lime or honey homemade marshmallows mixed in before they set up...

Edited by McAuliflower (log)

flavor floozy

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McAuliflower -- margarita marshmallows with salted dusting powder is pure genius! You must make them and tell us how they turn out!!!

On a side note, doesn't kiwi fruit have the same type of gelatin-breaking enzymes that makes pineapple a problem for fresh marshmallows?

Emily

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Ok it is settle Margarita marshmallows for St Patricks day..it is my dear friends birthday...he loves Margarita's so maybe I will hook him up with a theme basket!!!

thanks so much!!!

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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On a side note, doesn't kiwi fruit have the same type of gelatin-breaking enzymes that makes pineapple a problem for fresh marshmallows?

Emily

Oh yeah- you're right.

Cooking the fruit before adding to the marshmallows will destroy the enzymes that attack the gelatin.

Edited by McAuliflower (log)

flavor floozy

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Hi all --

Had to post about a new marshmallow aid -- Reynolds Release (the non-stick aluminum foil). The first time I made these and just greased regular foil, pulling the foil off was quite challenging despite the fact that I had greased it to high heaven. This time, that wrap came off like a dream! I am actually going to write to Reynolds and thank them!

Now hummingbirdkiss -- do tell -- how did those margarita marshmallows turn out?!

Emily

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I was wondering about making the same recipe but with less gelatine for piping pourpuse.If I would to fill some hollow chocolate shell I would need the marshmallow to be cold but still workable .Do you think ( any of you ) that would be possible?

Thank you

Vanessa

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I was wondering about making the same recipe but with less gelatine for piping pourpuse.If I would to fill some hollow chocolate shell I would need the marshmallow to be cold but still workable .Do you think ( any of you ) that would be possible?

Thank you

Maybe Marshmallow fluff is more what you're looking for?

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I made a sort of soft marshmallow, anyway I thought it didnt came out right,very liquidy , still creamy ,I would say the consitency of a genoise batter :rolleyes:

It was cool when I was done beating and I pour it some in some chocolate shells to see what happens when it dryes out.

I will report later.I add some dulce de leche to the batter .

Vanessa

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Hi all --

Had to post about a new marshmallow aid -- Reynolds Release (the non-stick aluminum foil). The first time I made these and just greased regular foil, pulling the foil off was quite challenging despite the fact that I had greased it to high heaven. This time, that wrap came off like a dream! I am actually going to write to Reynolds and thank them!

Now hummingbirdkiss -- do tell -- how did those margarita marshmallows turn out?!

Emily

what a great idea on the foil thanks!!!

Margarita Marshmallows (use Knightscotsman's perfect recipe)

half fresh squeezed lime juice with 1 tsp grated zest and half good tequilla for the base and to bloom the gelatine... a tsp of finely grated orange zest cooked into the sugar syrup ..if you have triple sec you could put it about a tablespoon I guess into the bloom...but I didn't so the orange peel worked well!

make as directed adding some green tint to the mix ...just enough to give it a limey/Margarita color ....(I used Wilton icing tint worked fine)

when the marshmallows are done add some margarita salt to the powdered sugar/potato flour mixture..to taste..(I used about 2 heaping tablespoons in 1 cup sugar/1 cup potato starch and saved what was left for another batch...)

garnish each marshmallow with a toothpick that has a sour lime jelly candy on it (like the sourpatch kids fruits)

these are so fun!!!! I could also see adding some New Mexican red chile to the coating

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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The experiment went great, the marshmallow stuff firmed up to a nice marshamllow consistency inside my chocolate shells and it tastes pretty good .So my Easter progect can go on .

My second thought after marshmallow fluff was Italian Meringue, which is supposed to have this marshmallowy consistency. :blink:

Then I came to my sense and realized that there's no way you'd be piping that into chocolate shells! :laugh:

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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The experiment went great, the marshmallow stuff firmed up to a nice marshamllow consistency inside my chocolate shells and it tastes pretty good .So my Easter progect can go on .

Now this opens up a whole new world of possibilities!! Take us along on your adventures with pictures! This sounds like so much fun and perfect for Easter (homemade "cadbury cream eggs" anyone?)

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Hehe , the experiments was half a try and half a mistake.

I took the recipe that almost everyone uses here ( me included ) and divided by half.

Now here I jmade the mistake to keep the water for the gelatin undivided so was a lot of water for that batch , the results was very liquid and kinda slashy.

After several minutes it turned into a batter that resembled more the genoise batter .Anyway when I add some dulche de Leche into it while was beating and when I was done it was cool enough to be piped into molds ( it was still quite liquidy ).When I went to chek the marshmallow had set and was airy as well , firm and with marshmallow consitency ( wich I thought was impossible from the initial consistency ).

Anyway it worked , but you will have to fill all your molds because the left over will set after a while as well ofcourse :raz:

Vanessa

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Is anyone thinking about making their own "Peeps" for Easter? I did it last year by following the directions in Dede Wilson's book on holiday candies, but with Nightscotsman's marshmallow recipe. It takes some practice to pipe them correctly, but once you get the hang of it, it's not so bad. They are far more delicious than the store-bought kind.

I'll try to do it again this year and post some pics. Be forwarned, though - it's a messy project. Here are my tips:

Take the sugar syrup slighty higher in temp than usual. This will help the fluff to be stiffer so it will hold its shape when piped.

Likewise, beat the mixture a little longer than usual.

Just pipe the guys out directly onto the sheet pan covered with lots of colored sugar. Get the really good sugar like from William's Sonoma - it makes a difference. Also, do yourself a favor and tint the batch pink or yellow or whatever, so that if you don't get them all the way covered, they don't have white patches.

These look adorable sitting on top of "nests" made from chocolate coated Shredded Wheat that have a few Cadbury Mini-Eggs in the middle. I did this last year and bagged them up for gifts.

I promise I'll take pictures this year . . .

"First rule in roadside beet sales, put the most attractive beets on top. The ones that make you pull the car over and go 'wow, I need this beet right now'. Those are the money beets." Dwight Schrute, The Office, Season 3, Product Recall

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Hey --

Was wondering if anyone out there had tried making an extra fruity batch, by substituting extra strained fruit puree for the water used in the blooming part of the recipe? Think I will give this a try but was curious if anyone else had...

Emily

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Hey --

Was wondering if anyone out there had tried making an extra fruity batch, by substituting extra strained fruit puree for the water used in the blooming part of the recipe? Think I will give this a try but was curious if anyone else had...

Emily

yes and it came out really wonderful! I used a cup half of it in the bloom and half in the sugar syrup and it worked out great

I would love to make PEEPS!!!!

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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