Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 2)


Becca Porter
 Share

Recommended Posts

There was such an excess of starch mixture both top and bottom of the slab that enough of it coated the knife and transfered to the cut edges as they were cut. I'd spooned on a LOT, both top and bottom. I also rolled each cut row onto the cutting board to pick up a bit more before doing the next cut...

When I made them before, I basically cut them one row at a time into squares and tossed them in my bowl of starch right away. This time I was able to do several rows at the same time and there was enough starch on the slab and cutting board that they didn't stick together and my knife kept pretty clean. I also found that the long chef's knife gave me straighter and sharper edges than the pizza cutter did.

Then I transfer the cut marshmallow squares to my bowl of starch mixture and toss them til they're well coated, then transfer them to a sieve where I shake off the excess. Try it next time! I'd live to hear if it works as well for you!

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Replace the liquid you use to hydrate the gelatin with fruit puree. You don't want to "boil it down", that just gives it an obvious cooked taste. There's a link to a strawberry marshmallow (wth variations) recipe somewhere towards the beginning of this thread that works great. It calls for half puree and half water to hydrate the gelatin, I use the recipe with straight fruit (I just replace the water with an equal amount of puree or juice) to hydrate the gelatin with no problems. The only adjustment I make for most fruits is the puree itself but some fruits benefit from a little lemon juice or citric acid to brighten them up a bit after the huge sugar hit. When I do apple, I work in a little citric and malic acid but it's not a necessity.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went a little marshmallow crazy this weekend. We're doing a baking exchange at work, and I thought it would be nice to contribute something other than cookies. I made plain vanilla marshmallows – some tossed with starch and some with toasted coconut...

eg_coc_marsh09.jpg

I also made chocolate (which I've made before), and peppermint (first time). I had no idea how much extract to use. I overdid it. The peppermint was waaaaaay too overpowering. A small taste from the mixer seemed okay, but it was too much in an entire marshmallow. I was wondering whether I should even include these in the exchange or call them a loss. And then I thought – hey, why not dip them in chocolate? Suddenly it's the perfect amount of peppermint to balance the dark chocolate...

eg_marsh09.jpg

Now I'm wondering if I should include them in the exchange because I want them all to myself. :raz:

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm busy working on batches of mallows for a bakesale, I was wondering... has anyone tried mixing space dust/popping candy into a batch? would they remain stable and poppy or would they turn to mush?

Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They won't turn to mush. They'll melt. They're just sugar. But, depending when you add them, they'll either melt very quickly when you dump in the hot syrup or less quickly once it's cooled a bit. How much less quickly, I don't know. I'm guessing not too many, if any, would survive for very long though. There's a fairly high initial loss rate even when adding them to straight cooled, melted chocolate which has far less water content than a marshmallow base.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi guys I would like to try making nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallow recipe (and of course other fruity flavours) but living in the uk I have a couple questions about ingredients:

firstly can anybody tell me how many grams are in the four envelopes of gelatin (just to see if we have a standarised size),

secondly I can't easily get corn syrup over here normally I just subsitute glucose syrup but i'm not sure if this really thick product would be a suitable replacement for the light corn syrup? if not would there be any thing else I could use instead?

failing that do you think it would be possible to add a fruit puree to this egg white recipe I have previously used: My link

any suggestions would be greatly appreciated

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi guys I would like to try making nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallow recipe (and of course other fruity flavours) but living in the uk I have a couple questions about ingredients:

firstly can anybody tell me how many grams are in the four envelopes of gelatin (just to see if we have a standarised size),

secondly I can't easily get corn syrup over here normally I just subsitute glucose syrup but i'm not sure if this really thick product would be a suitable replacement for the light corn syrup? if not would there be any thing else I could use instead?

failing that do you think it would be possible to add a fruit puree to this egg white recipe I have previously used: My link

any suggestions would be greatly appreciated

7 grams per package - use the glucose as is - you just boil off the extra water to get to temperature anyway,

And yes - you could sub the puree into that recipe. May require a bit of tweaking - but might not.

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I wanted to get the pure essence and flavor of the fruit what would I do? Would I strain puree then boil the juice down as much as possible and add it to a regular marshmallow recipe or would I replace the sugar and water with the juice

I second Tri2Cook's advice. If you have access to Amoretti fruit compounds these add fabulous flavour. I still use the fruit puree and then add some compound for an extra flavour boost.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Made the NS strawberry recipe with raspberries the week before Thanksgving - they were the best ones I've ever made! I think this weekend I'll make another batch, but I only have half the respberry puree I need. Instead of buying more raspebrries, I was thinking of doing a mix of raspberry and cranberry to use up the rest of the cranberries Ihave in my freezer. Has anyone used cranberries in marshmallows before? I have to cook them down so that I can make the puree, so I thought I'd add some sugar to them so they won't be too tart. Any thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Made the NS strawberry recipe with raspberries the week before Thanksgving - they were the best ones I've ever made! I think this weekend I'll make another batch, but I only have half the respberry puree I need. Instead of buying more raspebrries, I was thinking of doing a mix of raspberry and cranberry to use up the rest of the cranberries Ihave in my freezer. Has anyone used cranberries in marshmallows before? I have to cook them down so that I can make the puree, so I thought I'd add some sugar to them so they won't be too tart. Any thoughts?

I think you'll find the amount of sugar in the marshmallows will be plenty for the cranberries so you won't need to add more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay -

Re: your post at http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/40358-homemade-marshmallows-recipes-tips/page__view__findpost__p__1405147

Thanks and thanks again for the your utube videos! I'm late to the marshmallow party and just started reading this thread a couple days ago - your videos helped a lot in putting real-life pictures to the process. They're wonderful and oh! so helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay -

Re: your post at http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/40358-homemade-marshmallows-recipes-tips/page__view__findpost__p__1405147

Thanks and thanks again for the your utube videos! I'm late to the marshmallow party and just started reading this thread a couple days ago - your videos helped a lot in putting real-life pictures to the process. They're wonderful and oh! so helpful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Made cran-raspberry marshmallows last night. I had everything ready to go - geletin blooming, sugar measured and in the pan - when I found out that I had run out of corn syrup, and was already nearly out of sugar. :wacko: After a frantic search through all the cupboards I decided to throw some honey in to make up for the corn syrup.

The flavor turned out wonderful - the honey really complimented the slight bitterness that the cranberries brought. I need to cut them tonight - I can't wait to try them in some hot cocoa!

I also want to ask if anyone has tried a flavor with wasabi by any chance? I have read through this thread in the past and don't remmebr seeing it, but it has been a while. I just received some wasabi powder and I thought that it might be a neat flavor to try and do somthing with. For that matter, I also received powdered lemon peel and want to do something with that. Lemon-wasabi marshmallows anyone?

Edited by LizD518 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Thank you for all the advice

I made plain vanilla marshmallows for the first time a couple of weeks ago. I used this recipe:

Bloom:

10 TB water

1.5 Tb Vanilla Extract

3 Tb unflavored gelatin

Base:

3/4 Cup water

pinch salt

1.5 cups sugar

1 1/4 cups syrup (made from 2 cups water, 5 1/3 cup sugar, 1 t. cream of tarter, pinch of salt)

I beat them for about 15 minutes and they were rubbery.

Then last night I made the strawberry marshmallows linked on the first page of this thread. I subbed passion fruit puree for the strawberry.

OMG, they are sublime!!

BUT they are so soft, like eating clouds. And they are sticky, sticky, sticky. Very hard to cut.

So my question is can you overbeat marshmallow? And how do you know when it's done?

Thanks for any advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

Potentially stupid question about to come... I've always used the marshmallow recipe from Greweling's book, but this year I'm going to give nightscotsman's recipe a try. Now for the stupid question. The strawberry (or other fruit) purée – is that simply puréed and strained fruit?

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Emmalish,

I've made Nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallows before, and I did not strain the fruit. Since it was winter, I opted for frozen strawberries since the fresh ones looked so appalling. I just pureed them in a blender. The tiny seeds let people know it's actual strawberries and not just flavoring, in case the taste alone doesn't tip them off.

I recently made pumpkin spice marshmallows (based on Nightscotsman's recipe) using pumpkin puree and then dipped in dark chocolate for my wedding favors. Here's a very dark picture of that process. I find flipping the marshmallow out onto waxed paper sprinkled with a little powdered sugar and using a very lightly oiled (with cooking spray, or Crisco, or any other neutral-flavor oil) pizza cutter to be a fast way to cut the slab into squares. Then, I toss the squares in powdered sugar with a little additional cornstarch in a big Ziploc bag. I find using the smallest amount of cornstarch/powdered sugar in the bag as possible to be the best bet for coating the marshmallows enough to eliminate stickiness, but not to create a powdered doughnut effect. Had to learn that the hard way.

www.flickr.jpg

Edited by Romy (log)

"If you've heard this story before, don't stop me, because I'd like to hear it again." --Groucho Marx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Romy! In Greweling's recipe he has a variation including passion fruit purée reduced by 1/2. Wondered if that was one of those industry standard things that it's taken for granted that everyone (except me) knows about. The pumpkin and dark chocolate combination sounds fantastic. Did you add any spices to the mix?

I used to use an oiled pizza cutter as well, but found a way that works much better for me. See my post upthread, or here if you're interested.

Edited to ask if you have a larger version of your picture? It appears tiny to me and I'd love to see it.

Edited by emmalish (log)

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Romy! In Greweling's recipe he has a variation including passion fruit purée reduced by 1/2. Wondered if that was one of those industry standard things that it's taken for granted that everyone (except me) knows about. The pumpkin and dark chocolate combination sounds fantastic. Did you add any spices to the mix?

I used to use an oiled pizza cutter as well, but found a way that works much better for me. See my post upthread, or here if you're interested.

Edited to ask if you have a larger version of your picture? It appears tiny to me and I'd love to see it.

Ah, sorry! I was having some problems copying that photo from my husband's site. I've reposted here at a less squint-inducing size.

Hmm, I think that recipe must be referring to a cooked puree-- cooking to reduce the fruit puree by half and thereby getting a thicker, more gelled puree. Might be a worthwhile extra step. If I recall correctly, my strawberry marshmallows were a tiny bit softer than the vanilla bean marshmallows I made with the same recipe base (but not so much as to be less appealing). Might be that extra liquid and raw pectin!

I added cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg to my pumpkin spice marshmallows. Really, the pumpkin just made them a pretty color, I think. You can only add so much pumpkin before your marshmallows won't set. But no one minded-- they were really delicious. (Went well with my pumpkin spice, maple buttercream, and marshmallow fondant cake!) Warm spices and marshamllows are such a great combination, in my opinion. They can do so much for your routine hot cocoa. Cinnamon and cayenne might a good combo for hot cocoa (and probably already mentioned elsewhere!).

5084306268_83f46d8661.jpg

"If you've heard this story before, don't stop me, because I'd like to hear it again." --Groucho Marx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I had my first failed batch of marshmallows today, and I'm wondering might have been my mistake. I tried a cranberry version that ended up more like taffy in texture than marshmallow, and rubbery. I think the rubbery-ness is because I overbeat it since they never started getting fluffy like they normally do.

I've liked this lemon marshmallow recipe, so I tried using it as a base for cranberry. For this half batch, I boiled 1/4c cranberries and 1/2c water til it was reduced to about a 1/4c, then strained it to make a cranberry puree, which ended up being 3TB puree. I added 1TB fresh lemon juice, subbed this puree/lemon juice for the lemon juice in the gelatin bloom, and then followed the rest of the recipe like normal. I've made half batches before that have been fine, so I don't think that's an issue. Last week I made a half batch of clementine/honey based on this recipe that were the lightest I've made.

I did get distracted and let the syrup get to 258 instead of 250. It was the last packet of gelatin in my 32 pack, and all other batches have been fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

This week I made a batch of vanilla marshmallows and swirled in homemade caramel sauce right before panning them. They are seriously amazing. They taste like caramel ripple ice cream. The layers separate a bit but none of my testers thought it was an issue and in fact, some of them thought the difference in textures between the layers is what made them amazing. However, I'm wondering about shelf life. The caramel sauce is usually stored in the fridge. Fruit purees are as well so maybe it's fine but I worry about the butter and cream. Are there any guidelines on this? Instead of sauce should I make a firmer caramel that would normally be stored at room temp and just warm it to liquify before using?

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Nightscotsman regarding your marshmellow rcipe:

Beg pardon, I realize this is very old post but what size pan did you use? I checked Martha Stewart recipe and she used 9 x 9 pan. Your recipe appears about 1 1/2 x's her recipe. I'm thinking 9 x 12? Thanks in advance, Stephanie

Edited by sschiltz1 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nightscotsman regarding your marshmellow rcipe:

Beg pardon, I realize this is very old post but what size pan did you use? I checked Martha Stewart recipe and she used 9 x 9 pan. Your recipe appears about 1 1/2 x's her recipe. I'm thinking 9 x 12? Thanks in advance, Stephanie

Hi Stephanie, I made Nightscotsman's strawberry marshmallows last night, and there was a perfect amount of mixture to fill a 9x13 pan with 1in sides. There were a few tablespoons left over for 'testing' :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the quick reply, E.T. I've wanted to make this recipe for monthes but procrastinated. I think I had the winter blaahs! But we had a 70 d. day yesterday so I know spring is just around the corner!! Yah, just never mind tomorrows snow forcast, ugh!!!! Will try to get a trial run on the marshmallows tomorrow eve. Wish me luck! Steph :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By amyneill
      Hi all!! 
      I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 
      Thank you!
      Amy
       
    • By amyneill
      Hi all! I just wanted to pop in here and see if anyone had some advice on canning/jarring caramel sauce for ready-to-eat consumption. The ice cream shop I work at is putting together gift baskets for valentine's day and we wanted to toss in some caramel and fudge jars in to add some tasty treats. We have a recipe that works great in the shop in our squeeze bottles for topping the ice cream, however I don't have a ton of experience with the canning process to make it shelf stable and shippable. I've canned tomato sauce and salsa in the past, but my method wouldn't be efficient for canning hundreds of jars for consumption. What is your method for success? Does it all hinge on the sealing process, and if so what are your favorite (cost efficient) products? Do you know of a jar that is self sealing or more durable than others?
      Thanks for any suggestions! 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...