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thelittlechef7

Cookware in Paris

16 posts in this topic

Hi all,

 

I'm planning on making a trip to Paris this summer and taking advantage of the great cookware. I've read around a bit and concluded that some of the big name stores to buy cookware are:

 

Dehillerin

MORA

 

And brands to look for are Mauviel and Falk Culinair. 

 

I'm looking to buy a good-sized (10-11inch) curved sauteuse evasee made of copper with stainless steel lining. Keeping in mind that I'm a college student on a budget but willing to make an investment out of the rare chance to travel to Paris, are there any alternative places in Paris to buy what I'm looking for?

 

I'm not picky about branding or looks, but I do want a quality, preferably copper, saute pan that is responsive and can maintain its heat well (for all those stir frys I plan to cook in it!). I don't mind having a non-brand pan at all so long as it meets these requirements. 

 

Looking at the prices here, it seems like what I want will run me $150-$200. What is about the lowest price I can expect in Paris? 

 

Thanks!


"Plants, like algebra, have a habit of looking alike and being different, or looking different and being alike; consequently mathematics and botany confuse me."

 

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In my opinion, you're better off buying the cookware you want here in the US.  The prices in Paris are not what they were even a dozen years ago, and the exchange rate makes them even higher.

 

You'll do just as well scouring the internet for deals.  By all means, go to DeH and Mora just because, and maybe to handle those pans that you lust after, but buy them here.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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I agree that it's better to buy your cookware in the US. You can search the internet or just visit the Amazon. It often offers sales and discounts. So, there is a good chance to buy a cookware at the lowest price.

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In my opinion, you're better off buying the cookware you want here in the US.  The prices in Paris are not what they were even a dozen years ago, and the exchange rate makes them even higher.

 

You'll do just as well scouring the internet for deals.  By all means, go to DeH and Mora just because, and maybe to handle those pans that you lust after, but buy them here.

 

Agreed, generally, with one exception: Every country has brands that are very standard, accessible offerings domestically, but are exported as luxury brands. Such brands/items may be found at really good prices in shops that are the equivalent of Target (ask around for the names of these), in the US.

 

Although buying online may end up being your best bet, anyway, check the big, mid-priced shops in and near Paris for the the items you're interested in; you may be pleasantly surprised.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
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Also you may be able to find open box items in the store at a significant discount.  A little scratch does not affect use of pots and pans, you will add plenty a blemish while cooking with them.  

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I agree that it's better to buy your cookware in the US. You can search the internet or just visit the Amazon. It often offers sales and discounts. So, there is a good chance to buy a cookware at the lowest price.

 

Except electric cookwares.

 

Different plugs.

 

 

dcarch

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Also you may be able to find open box items in the store at a significant discount.  A little scratch does not affect use of pots and pans, you will add plenty a blemish while cooking with them.  

Not at DeHellerin. Most everything is already scratched and/or dirty.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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i agree in theory that it's better to buy at home. there is, however, something to be said for the sentiment a pan has when you remember buying it on your first (or fifth or fiftieth) trip to paris.


Edited by chezcherie (log)
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"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

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Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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Id go to DeHellerin  I got a ton of stuff from them, but that was a long time ago. its an eye-0pener.

 

but Id spend most of my time looking for superb neighborhood bistros.

 

you cant eat on-line.

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re thinking this :

 

your plan is a decent one, get one pan.

 

consider these:

 

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/copper-cuprinox-extra-thick-xsl-243_270.html

 

this one:

 

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/round-frying-pan-iron-handle-stainless-steel-interior-22-cm-xml-243_270-1223.html

 

or like this:

 

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/round-frying-pan-iron-handle-stainless-steel-interior-22-cm-xml-243_270-1223.html

 

also consider the Induction Copper Pans

 

eventually if you really enjoy cooking, you will get a mega watt and amp induction cook surface.

 

not just now, once you become a Mogul.

 

look at these :

 

http://eshop.e-dehillerin.fr/en/copper-inox-induction-copper-xsl-243_269.html

 

but a Pan from France  ( one ) will be very nice.

 

remember :  you are going there to discover The Best Bistro !

 

I hope you let us know about your Experience !

 

:biggrin:

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Hello, Little Chef:

 

  Wow, are YOU going to have fun!  You should spluge BIG if/when a pan speaks words of love to you.

 

  FWIW, I disagree with others here, both as to the proposition that the same pan can be had here in USA for less, and the "life significance" of acquiring a beloved batterie piece while in the culinary capital of the world.

 

  My classmate and Parisophile David Liebovitz has already written most of what, IMO, you need to know: http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2010/06/cookware-shops-in-paris-dehillerin-copper-mora-baking-supplies/ Pardon me if you already have found David's article.  Take appropriate note of David's explanation of the VAT exemption and 10% tourist discounts.

 

  I would also urge you to: (a) scour the brocantes; and (b) invest some quality advance time perusing ebay.fr.  The former would be impulse-oriented, and the latter might take advantage of saving you the TERRIBLE postage/shipping charges from la post or Colissimo by buying a rare item before you leave (many French sellers refuse to ship to USA), and then bring your treasure home with you.  In either case, make a  friend of the soul you buy it from!  

 

  I realize you are oriented toward bimetal (SS-lined) pans, but I humbly suggest that if you find a vintage, planished, extra fort or hotel-grade saute lined in tin that speaks to you, you will be much happier in the long run over buying any of the current new-production bimetal pans (e.g., Falk or Mauviel SS-lined, which are at most 2.3mm of copper).  

 

  I guarantee if you walk into a bistro or bouchon lugging a vintage extra-fort Gaillard or Jacquotot, it will be your passport to friendship.

 

  Have a blast!         


Edited by boilsover (log)

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I haven't been to Paris since the '60's and early '70's but I've had great success ordering French cookware from amazon.fr.  Shipping to the US costs something, it is true, but amazon.fr offers an all inclusive price at checkout that includes all brokerage fees, duties and taxes (except state use tax).

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I thought I wanted to buy copper cookware in Paris, but when I got to Dehillerin everything looked like it weighed at least 300 pounds and I just did not want to lug it home.  Bought all my copper online, much from ebay, with excellent bargain prices.  I did get some nice, carbon steel knives at Dehillerin, and the best pizza knife on earth I found at Mora.  You never know what will surprise you!


*****

"Did you see what Julia Child did to that chicken?" ... Howard Borden on "Bob Newhart"

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Wow thanks for all the replies! I'm very excited for the trip and, after hearing a lot of opinions about buying cookware in the US instead, will be flexible about my purchases (if any). If I find something at a good price (or just really love it), then I'll go ahead and get it, but otherwise I might just buy it in the US. The other factor is that I'm going directly to Spain afterwards to walk the El Camino de Santiago, so I'd be lugging any purchases in my pack for 500 miles and therefore I'll have to really want it to go through that effort!  :laugh:

 

Boilsover, I never thought of looking for vintage cookware, so if I get a chance I will definitely go look check out the brocantes. I'm still a bit unsure of tin-lined cookware though; I heard it can't handle higher temperatures (which is something I don't want to have to worry about) and can possibly contain lead in the tinning. I probably won't be able to buy from ebay.fr because I'll only be there for 8 days (after which I'm going to Spain). 


"Plants, like algebra, have a habit of looking alike and being different, or looking different and being alike; consequently mathematics and botany confuse me."

 

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Littlechef, whatever you end up buying, DON'T take it on the Camino with you!  Everybody ends up trying to shed pack weight once they begin; even a small pan is more than you want to have to carry.

 

It's possible to send items to the post office in Santiago for pickup when you get there.  I strongly advise you to look into this, rather than carrying anything that isn't essential (and your definition of 'essential' will change rapidly, once you start walking).

 

¡Buen camino!

 

Leslie (peregrino 2001)

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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Ahaha yes, I've heard over-packing horror stories! 

 

I have experienced this personally after taking an intense week-long backpacking trip earlier this spring (I did portions of the Appalachian Trail and Bartram Trail in North Carolina/Georgia). By the middle I was even ready to throw food out! That trip had much, much more gear since we were camping (tents, stoves, large sleeping bags/pads, food, etc.) and the hike was a lot more strenuous than el Camino, so I figured without all that camping gear and an easier hike I could sneak in a pan  :rolleyes:

 

But I'll keep that in mind and look into mailing it to Santiago if it is too much weight to carry (and if I buy a pan at all...). 

 

Thanks for the input!


Edited by thelittlechef7 (log)

"Plants, like algebra, have a habit of looking alike and being different, or looking different and being alike; consequently mathematics and botany confuse me."

 

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