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Behold My Butt! (2007– )

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@gfweb 

 

congratulations !

 

looks delicious !

 

lettuce from the garden

 

C*AP !

 

I remember it well ....

 

BTW   this is a very fine book:

 

Lettuce in Your Kitchen: Flavorful And Unexpected Main-Dish Salads And Dressings

 

get it used.

 

all his books are 5 star +++++

 

https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks&rh=p_27%3AChristopher+Schlesinger&s=relevancerank&text=Christopher+Schlesinger&ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1

 

had restaurants in Cambridge , and then S.Shore

 

and a very nice guy to boot.

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

 

Seasoning?

Brined from about 10:00 yesterday until I put it on the smoker. No other seasoning. Hickory for the smoke.


Regina

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36 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb 

 

congratulations !

 

looks delicious !

 

lettuce from the garden

 

C*AP !

 

I remember it well ....

 

BTW   this is a very fine book:

 

Lettuce in Your Kitchen: Flavorful And Unexpected Main-Dish Salads And Dressings

 

get it used.

 

all his books are 5 star +++++

 

https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks&rh=p_27%3AChristopher+Schlesinger&s=relevancerank&text=Christopher+Schlesinger&ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1

 

had restaurants in Cambridge , and then S.Shore

 

and a very nice guy to boot.

 

Doggone it, rotuts -- just when I think I've succeeded in my resolve to not collect more cookbooks, you come up with this temptation! Even the salad and dressing on the Amazon page looks good. There goes my resolve. O.o

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Just now, Regina3000 said:

Brined from about 10:00 yesterday until I put it on the smoker. No other seasoning. Hickory for the smoke.

 

I hope you'll show the results! That must be a pretty big smoker, to take all that at once. I'm in the market, maybe, for a new smoker, so I'd be interested to know more about the smoker itself as well as the results.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Posted (edited)

all his books are outstanding.

 

look for the used , but in god to very good condition

 

you cant go wrong.

 

I didn't , and bought them new 

 

@ an early Amazon.   40 % was the standard discount.

 

The Google Twins wanted to get in on the action , for some reason , and offered a

 

free something or other paying service , and I got 30 % more off.  through them but @ the Amazon web site

 

that extra % off didn't ,last that long , a year or so.

 

Hee Hee


Edited by rotuts (log)
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I have that cookbook....bought on @rotuts previous recommendation!  Very good...I love salads.

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C*AP

 

Id rather have one of the Bibb's I used to plant in my veg garden

 

root on , of course  resting comfortably in the refrig.

 

maybe a few green onions 

 

for the tops "  Shrubbery "

 

consider any of the other books

 

get them used , works well.

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33 minutes ago, rotuts said:

C*AP

 

Id rather have one of the Bibb's I used to plant in my veg garden

 

root on , of course  resting comfortably in the refrig.

 

maybe a few green onions 

 

for the tops "  Shrubbery "

 

consider any of the other books

 

get them used , works well.

 

My minigarden is just a big 4x 3 ft box. Its been producing enough for nightly salads from a 1x 3 foot space. I should've done this years ago.

 

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2 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Doggone it, rotuts -- just when I think I've succeeded in my resolve to not collect more cookbooks, you come up with this temptation! Even the salad and dressing on the Amazon page looks good. There goes my resolve. O.o

$3 on ebay

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@gfweb  

 

you bet .

 

in my garden HayDays

 

I had 10 different Bibb's  , everything planted from seeds

 

in trays initially indoors then outdoors under a HomeMadeCanapy

 

8 heads each .  carefully manicured soil.

 

Initially i had Ajax  a yellow lab , an alpha dog to wader around while

 

I gardened.

 

then 10 years later , Ridge , a black lab.

 

he was a PartyDog   :  knew every dog at the ElmBank and loved to play.

 

one day , w my 20 or so perfect Bibb's doing  very well  a few feet past

 

a window in my living room ,, open

 

I heard  as odd sound   ' munch much much '

 

looks out:

 

a morbidly obese woodchuck 

 

who could barely waddle away 

 

ate all of the 20 0or so bibbs

 

right down to the stem.

 

did you know there are Bibb lettuce seeds

 

that you can get , that can only be sported on top 

 

of yours panting mix ?

 

they need the sun it seems to sprout 

 

and your spritzer spray to keel them moist for 4 - 5 days until they sprout ?

 

very pale Bibb's , excellent flavor

 

 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, gfweb said:

$3 on ebay

 

Sad face because I just spent $3 more than I needed to! (I had already succumbed to temptation.) xD

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

I hope you'll show the results! That must be a pretty big smoker, to take all that at once. I'm in the market, maybe, for a new smoker, so I'd be interested to know more about the smoker itself as well as the results.

I will, when it's done! It's a new-to-me Brinkmann vertical charcoal water smoker, one of the boxy kind. I've never used a charcoal smoker before, so it's been a learning experience.

 

I've had issues keeping the temperature up to 200 F. I think that we're going to ditch the OEM charcoal pan and find or make a deep rectangular one that I can load up with charcoal and wood á la Minion, even thought it's not a WSM.

 

I put the meat in the smoker at 5 minutes to 8 this morning, and at 5 after 10 tonight, one still hadn't gotten above 138 (bone-in) and the other not above 149 (boneless), so I pulled them out of the smoker and put them in the oven at 250 F. I put them on a rack in a half sheet pan. Strangely enough, about half an hour later, they haven't gone up in temperature at all. I'll keep an eye on them for another half an hour before I start to freak out.


Edited by Regina3000 typo (log)
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Regina

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33 minutes ago, Regina3000 said:

I will, when it's done! It's a new-to-me Brinkmann vertical charcoal water smoker, one of the boxy kind. I've never used a charcoal smoker before, so it's been a learning experience.

 

I've had issues keeping the temperature up to 200 F. I think that we're going to ditch the OEM charcoal pan and find or make a deep rectangular one that I can load up with charcoal and wood á la Minion, even thought it's not a WSM.

 

I put the meat in the smoker at 5 minutes to 8 this morning, and at 5 after 10 tonight, one still hadn't gotten above 138 (bone-in) and the other not above 149 (bineless), so I pulled them out of the smoker and put them in the oven at 250 F. I put them on a rack in a half sheet pan. Strangely enough, about half an hour later, they haven't gone up in temperature at all. I'll keep an eye on them for another half an hour before I start to freak out.

Ok, half an hour later, temps started to budge upwards. Now to just have patience.


Regina

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55 minutes ago, Regina3000 said:

Ok, half an hour later, temps started to budge upwards. Now to just have patience.

And just before midnight, the boneless butt hit 160.

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Regina

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9 hours ago, Regina3000 said:

And just before midnight, the boneless butt hit 160.

I had to give up and go to bed shortly after 1 a.m. The boneless was at 165 and the bone-in at 154. I turned the oven off. I got up about 6:15 and turned the oven back on. The boneless was at 118 and the bone-in at 122. As of 20 minutes to 10, they were at 174 and 160, respectively. I'll turn the oven off when the bone-in hits 190. I may pull the boneless out when it hits 190, then let it rest before pulling it apart.


Regina

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20 minutes ago, Regina3000 said:

I had to give up and go to bed shortly after 1 a.m. T

 

For  taste of eGullet history and smoking anxiety you might enjoy  

 

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

 

For  taste of eGullet history and smoking anxiety you might enjoy  

 

Thanks! I'll look at that shortly!


Regina

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I pulled the boneless butt out of the oven at 190 F. Before I did, I stuck a fork in it and twisted, and it started to separate effortlessly.

701114763_bonelessporkbuttsmoked20200525.thumb.jpg.eac922b5b4b4e31ead46e1464b2da64d.jpg

"Front"

2108003025_bonelessporkbuttsmoked20200525otherside.thumb.jpg.8771fcd504bb722991036cda6146da96.jpg

"Back"

 

I covered it with foil.

 

While composing this, the other thermometer told me the bone-in hit 180 F, so I reset it to let me know when it reaches 190.

 

It smells sooooo gooooooood.

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Regina

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Posted (edited)

Shredded (HOT!) and ate a bit for lunch.

1911948661_bonelessporkbuttsmokedshredded20200526.thumb.jpg.3911d8c7c16fc2cb2aedcaa9150da3cf.jpg

 

Still need to shred the rest. I'm going to wait until it's a bit cooler.


Edited by Regina3000 (log)
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Regina

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Beautiful!

 

When we used to do whole shoulders, we'd put them on the pit at 6 p.m. in order to eat at noon or shortly thereafter the next day. It required a house party so there'd be shifts of folks to stay up with it and turn it hourly. We'd also baste with a vinegar-based barbecue sauce.

 

Rather than temping the meat, we had a thermometer in the lid of the pit (my father was a welder and could make anything -- including the pit and lid, out of galvanized metal; pit had an open bottom so coals were on the ground). We'd do the first three hours at 175, the next six at 200, and then finishing at 225 for three more and 250 for two after that. Produced perfect shoulders.

 

I still have the lid to the pit; the bottom rusted out long ago. But concrete blocks make a serviceable one. It'll hold four shoulders; very rarely do I have the occasion to cook that many any more.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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47 minutes ago, kayb said:

Beautiful!

 

When we used to do whole shoulders, we'd put them on the pit at 6 p.m. in order to eat at noon or shortly thereafter the next day. It required a house party so there'd be shifts of folks to stay up with it and turn it hourly. We'd also baste with a vinegar-based barbecue sauce.

 

Rather than temping the meat, we had a thermometer in the lid of the pit (my father was a welder and could make anything -- including the pit and lid, out of galvanized metal; pit had an open bottom so coals were on the ground). We'd do the first three hours at 175, the next six at 200, and then finishing at 225 for three more and 250 for two after that. Produced perfect shoulders.

 

I still have the lid to the pit; the bottom rusted out long ago. But concrete blocks make a serviceable one. It'll hold four shoulders; very rarely do I have the occasion to cook that many any more.

 

That sounds like a neat set-up!


Regina

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Here's the picnic roast.

 

855455552_picnicroastsmoked20200525otherside.thumb.jpg.9270c6c715684b1431ee3cf3bce50d4b.jpg

1628726845_picnicroastsmoked20200525.thumb.jpg.97995beb5e7efc861418e29ef2faf745.jpg

1794760747_picnicroastsmokeddisassembled20200526.thumb.jpg.4e106d867b5cf797e62ea4ad1c6f8d6d.jpg

 

What to do with the skin!?! It's beautiful, but tough. Should I put it in the stock pot along with the fat and bone?

 

I REALLY like this one. More unctuous.

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Regina

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1 hour ago, Regina3000 said:

What to do with the skin!?! It's beautiful, but tough. Should I put it in the stock pot along with the fat and bone?

 

Congratulations on your results! As to your question: I'd say yes to putting the skin into whatever the fat and bone go into. It could be stock. It could be beans, or bean soup. Or a mess of greens, like collard greens. Heck, potatoes might even benefit from that flavoring. :) 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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9 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Congratulations on your results! As to your question: I'd say yes to putting the skin into whatever the fat and bone go into. It could be stock. It could be beans, or bean soup. Or a mess of greens, like collard greens. Heck, potatoes might even benefit from that flavoring. :) 

I'll throw it in whole with the stock, then. My dear partner wants nothing to do with the skin and doesn't like beans. He's opposed to the idea of stock on principle ("Why would you put the parts you can't eat in there! Don't feed me that!"), but I love beans, and will probably reserve some of the stock for that purpose.

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Regina

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