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Garlic powder is on my shopping list, but I've only bought it once, years ago, so I'm not familiar with what's available.

 

Is most garlic powder pretty much the same, apart from the US v Chinese origin?  Have there been any taste or quality tests done - couldn't find anything?  Any favorite or most-used brand that you use?

 

Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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I've had a few brands before, mostly the generic supermarket brands (Safeway, no name, etc.).  Can't recall any difference in taste, though.  Currently using Dan-D-Pak brand.  I prefer the coarser granulated garlic over the powdered kind.

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I am with Beebs on preferring granulated garlic versus the powder that is almost like flour. I don't use it often but do keep a bottle in the pantry. I have been buying the Olde Thompson California granulated garlic from Smart & Final.

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I am with Beebs on preferring granulated garlic versus the powder that is almost like flour.

 

Until reading this thread, I didn't realize granulated garlic and garlic powder were so different.  I've since heard of dried, minced garlic.  Penzeys carries it, and maybe other brands are available.  It also seems pretty easy to make dried garlic granules and dried minced garlic.

 ... Shel


 

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What are you planning to use it for? That might affect granulated versus dried minced. 

 

The original thought was to sprinkle it on frozen pizza, perhaps hamburgers, maybe use it in a dry rub, but other uses may manifest once the stuff is in my kitchen.

 ... Shel


 

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A more basic question - why does one even use garlic powder?  Just curious.  What is wrong with using actual cloves of garlic?

 

pretty commonly used in BBQ rubs

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Garlic powder is on my shopping list, but I've only bought it once, years ago, so I'm not familiar with what's available.

 

Is most garlic powder pretty much the same, apart from the US v Chinese origin?  Have there been any taste or quality tests done - couldn't find anything?  Any favorite or most-used brand that you use?

 

Thanks!

 

I've tried many over the years, and there's a big variation in taste. Some are absolutely horrible. The only one I use is Penzey's. 

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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A more basic question - why does one even use garlic powder?  Just curious.  What is wrong with using actual cloves of garlic?

 

Barbecue rubs, as has been mentioned, homemade cajun seasoning, sauces that need to be perfectly smooth, also maybe a bit of emergency garlic at the end of cooking (say if you didn't put enough fresh garlic in at the beginning) 

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A more basic question - why does one even use garlic powder?  Just curious.  What is wrong with using actual cloves of garlic?

 

It's got it's place in some things.  I use it for seasoning dredging flour, bread crumbs, dry rubs, etc.  I don't use it as a replacement for fresh garlic, but as a different seasoning altogether.

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Get some high quality garlic cloves and make your own dried/granulated...that's what i do for rubs and the like.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Fresh garlic would burn, making a really bad flavor, in some recipes where it would be exposed to high heat. Because it won't burn as easily, those are the applications that dried powder/granulated is used for: BBQ rubs, grill marinades, some roast recipes, etc. I've made an oven-roasted wings recipe for a client that turned out terribly bitter when my boss insisted we use real fresh garlic instead of the powder called for in the recipe.

 

And, then, some people use powder for convenience on pretty much anything. I can't really speak to that, I always have fresh at hand and make roasted a couple times a month for variety.

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Also, for what it's worth, as I mentioned in my post on the eG falafel cookoff, apparently Arax, one of the tastiest and most famous falafel joints in Lebanon uses garlic (and onion) powder in its falafel, as opposed to fresh. Not sure why, as many recipes I've seen call for fresh, but perhaps it's for ease of measurement and consistency?

Edited by Hassouni (log)
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