Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Passover 2006–


TarteTatin
 Share

Recommended Posts

I think this is my favorite of all the year-to-year recurring threads. Just the home and family of it, the ages of history and tradition, the warmth of the candles and hearth and people around the table, generation after generation.

"Laundried chicken" :biggrin: That's what happens to the big ole hen simmered for dumplings---she's dragged out of the broth and dismembered into pale, rich pieces, sometimes left on a plate as part of the main dish.

I love seeing you all swap recipes and memories.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi. I am starting to get ready for the pesach seder- I will have about 24 people. Today I bought a few kosher for passover things so I don't have to order a truck to drag everything home in one run!! This year there are some breakfast cereals- good for my little one as she starves for a week usually!

Do you guys get these too?

Probablt horribly sweet- "Pillows" filled with a chocolate hazelnut cream:

gallery_53591_4944_68420.jpg

Corn Flakes- also gluten free- why don't they make them all year?!

gallery_53591_4944_99839.jpg

The kids-young and old love these huge cookies especiallyy for dipping:

gallery_53591_4944_242275.jpg

Same taste different size and shape:

gallery_53591_4944_114734.jpg

Lots of matzas:

gallery_53591_4944_297282.jpg

gallery_53591_4944_86964.jpg

Bye!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the topic of matzo balls....my family always likes to cook them in the chicken stock and serve right away, but last year when I tried to do this on my own it became more like matzo-drop soup because they all fell apart! Did I just not use enough egg, or am I doomed? Also, when using seltzer in your soup, how do you compensate for the extra liquid, and how much seltzer should you use?

Thanks!!

Jenny

Btw, best way to make charoset is instead of using manichewitz (sp) for your wine, use a nice desert fruit wine like raspberry or blackberry--really yummy! If you want you can even use the leftover as your 4th glass of wine :biggrin:

“Ruling a great state is like cooking a small fish.”

Those who favor leniency say [it means] “do not disturb it too much”; those who favor strictness say “give it salt and vinegar, that’s it.”

~Huainanzi, ch. 11

http://ladolcejenny.blogspot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

watched The Gefilte Fish Chronicles last night. i laughed, i cried. it reminded me of not only several friends who are jewish with big, lively families but many who are also polish and italian. what a cast of characters and teaching the next generation to make the cholent and gefilte fish was laugh out loud funny.

a blessed holiday to all

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finished the charoset and the horseradish tonight. Horseradish is chemical weapon strength. My eyes are still tearing up.

gallery_7409_476_60785.jpg

Looking forward to having some gefilte fish tomorrow evening with this. :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What makes for a truly fantastic potato kugel? I've never made one, and those I've consumed are invariably dry. I'm willing to add dairy to enrich it. I have most of the usual ingredients on hand that I imagine might go into this, except for potato starch--which I can probably buy if necessary. I even have schmaltz in the freezer. Advice?

With RecipeGullet down, I can't check the two recipes there for reference, so PMs or posts with recipes would be welcome...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finished the charoset and the horseradish tonight.  Horseradish is chemical weapon strength.  My eyes are still tearing up.

gallery_7409_476_60785.jpg

Looking forward to having some gefilte fish tomorrow evening with this. :smile:

Katie mine is packed and ready to go. I have 6 lbs of horseradish that I made for our two large Seders. I use a couple of raw beets to give it color.

We will be driving over the causeway to Tampa as usual to connect with the every growing family. Everyone really loves the horseradish strong. In addition to the horseradish the baton has been pass unto me to lead the service. Fun having to keep 40-60 people in line for the hour long service. :wacko:

Happy Passover to all

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 pounds!! That's an awful lot of sinus clearing. :biggrin:

I roast the beets and then dice them into the already finished horseradish in the processor. Two minutes more and everything is bright fuschia.

Have fun being fearless leader. The seder I am attending this evening is with the family of my college roommate. I've been their guest for first seder for going on 25 years or so, and am more or less the spare daughter they never asked for. Uncle Bill, our fearless leader, passed away several months ago and this will be the first seder without him. We will undoubtedly raise a glass to him and other absent friends.

L'chaim and Happy Passover everyone! Next year in Jerusalem! :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't observe Passover (being Protestant and all) but I want to celebrate it by making matzo ball soup. I already have some home made chicken stock that I made a while back and have been keeping in the freezer. So, really, I just need help with the matzo balls. I'l looking back a few pages, and don't see any recipes. I'd really like some night and light "floaters" instead of sinkers.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's not too late, I use this matzo ball recipe all the time and really enjoy it. I'm not sure whether they're considered sinkers or floaters, but they are really good, especially made with schmaltz. I normally use plain water in the mixture, but perhaps the seltzer would make them fluffier and more to your liking.

P.S. I'm not Jewish, but my husband is (Bronx, NY born) and he loves them:

PASSOVER MATZO BALLS

This is the recipe from the back of the box of STREIT’s Passover Matzo Meal.

Ingredients

  1. 1 cup matzo meal

  2. 4 large eggs

  3. 1/4 cup oil or schmaltz

  4. 1/4 cup water or seltzer

  5. 1 tsp salt or to taste (or 2 tsp kosher salt)

  6. Pinch of ground pepper

Directions

  1.  BEAT eggs. Add water, oil, salt and pepper. MIX well. ADD matzo meal and stir thoroughly. REFRIGERATE for 1/2 to 1 hour.

  2.  Partially fill a large pot with water and bring to a BOIL. MOISTEN palms with cold water. FORM mixture into balls about 1” diameter. DROP matzo balls into boiling water.  (Note:  I boil them in water flavored with chicken bouillon.  Don't muddy your nice, clear chicken stock by boiling matzo balls in them, but also don't just use plain water.)

  3.  When all the matzo balls are in the pot, reduce heat to low. SIMMER covered for about 30 minutes or until done. REMOVE with slotted spoon to a large bowl.

  4.  SIMMER the matzo balls for 15 minutes in your favorite chicken soup before serving.

Good Pesach!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks.

That recipe looks pretty much identical to what is on the box of matzo meal I have, except it calls for oil or margerine. But I have some rendered chicken fat, so I am using that. And I'll use the seltzer, too. Also, I've been advised by other to heavily salt the water as well.

So, that's what I am going with.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My matzoh balls were awful last night! They not only sunk but they were tough and chewy. I should not have used the recipe off the side of the can (which is already out in the garbage) instead of my old stand-by from the Joy of Cooking. In the Joy they separate the eggs and beat the whites. I thought, oh, maybe that is overkill. Now I have a whole year now to ponder this, and to try to live it down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My matzoh balls were awful last night! They not only sunk but they were tough and chewy.  I should not have used the recipe off the side of the can (which is already out in the garbage) instead of my old stand-by from the Joy of Cooking. In the Joy they separate the eggs and beat the whites. I thought, oh, maybe that is overkill. Now I have a whole year now to ponder this, and to try to live it down.

uh oh.. NOW it's too late. I just mixed them up and the doug/batter is resting in the fridge. Separating eggs and beating the whites? That's extra work!! :hmmm::wink:

We'll see how these turn out and next time, I'll try this method.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My matzoh balls were awful last night! They not only sunk but they were tough and chewy.  I should not have used the recipe off the side of the can (which is already out in the garbage) instead of my old stand-by from the Joy of Cooking. In the Joy they separate the eggs and beat the whites. I thought, oh, maybe that is overkill. Now I have a whole year now to ponder this, and to try to live it down.

uh oh.. NOW it's too late. I just mixed them up and the doug/batter is resting in the fridge. Separating eggs and beating the whites? That's extra work!! :hmmm::wink:

We'll see how these turn out and next time, I'll try this method.

My only words of wisdom are to use a light hand when forming them - no squashing. And do not "peek" until the allotted time is up. They seem to swell better when given privacy. Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My matzoh balls were awful last night! They not only sunk but they were tough and chewy.  I should not have used the recipe off the side of the can (which is already out in the garbage) instead of my old stand-by from the Joy of Cooking. In the Joy they separate the eggs and beat the whites. I thought, oh, maybe that is overkill. Now I have a whole year now to ponder this, and to try to live it down.

uh oh.. NOW it's too late. I just mixed them up and the doug/batter is resting in the fridge. Separating eggs and beating the whites? That's extra work!! :hmmm::wink:

We'll see how these turn out and next time, I'll try this method.

My only words of wisdom are to use a light hand when forming them - no squashing. And do not "peek" until the allotted time is up. They seem to swell better when given privacy. Good luck.

well, it seems to have worked out OK. I've got some pics posted in a matzo ball topic over in the Cooking forum. Thanks to everyone for their tips/advice. I think my "celebration" of Passover was successful.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't observe Passover (being Protestant and all) but I want to celebrate it by making matzo ball soup.

Heh. You want to celebrate Passover, first clean your house from top to bottom, make sure there is no leavening anywhere, blowtorch your oven, go shopping for all the Passover necessities, THEN make matzo ball soup. For 30. :shock: (Glad to read yours came out well. I hope you enjoyed making them and eating them.) :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A noble first attempt jsmeeker! And you even got floaters! Nicely done. :smile:

I've had two different versions of matzoh ball soup over the last two days and both were delicious. Good strong broth, and light and fluffy knaidlach. Just as it ought to be.

I still want to attempt that dill-horseradish pistou recipe for the matzoh ball soup in the latest edition of Food & Wine. It looks really interesting and I can never eat too much horseradish or matzoh ball soup.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How nice to celebrate Passover jsmeeker!! Hope you enjoyed your little celebration. We had 22 or so people at my house- lotsof boys between ages 15 and 22 so they were constantly hungry, I just left out the leftovers during the day and it was delightful to see the roast beef (came out OKAY not great), chicken and matzo schnitzel slowly get less and less. We raised a 5th cup of wine for the kidnapped soldiers who are not free to clebrate this holiday of freedom. It was a quiet few days in my town luckily- but not so quiet in other areas -unfortunately. I wish everyone be blessed Chag Sameach, lots of freedom and peace.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm exhausted and stuffed. And it wasn't even at my house. Night one with my parents. My all grown-up baby brother has been intrigued by Kabbalah and treated us to a little Kabbalah commentary along with the regular, decades-old, Maxwell House Haggadah that my folks use. Being the family baker, I brought home-made almond macarroons & flourless chocolate cake. I typically make more but there were only 10 of us on the first night.

Last night, more relaxed at my neighbors house though still about 10 people. Per request, I made a potato kugel. Used the recipe from the April Bon Apetit. Easy enough as you just whiz everything in the food processor but the taste was nothing special. (I seem to be the only one who likes "Mel's Mother's Fruit Kugel" -- that I think I posted on eGRA - but I may go back to that.) Also 2 kinds of charoset.

Oh yes, Grandma's matzah farfel muffins (which are savory) for both nights.

Wouldn't you know it, nobody gave me leftovers to go home so I have no brisket or chicken all ready for the week and still have more cooking to do.

So long and thanks for all the fish.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sigh. I got sick on Friday, so I didn't make it to the seder our family friends had on Saturday. But, I enjoyed the prime rib that they had, with a simple salad and some roasted potatoes. Last night was hosted by my aunt and uncle. Little cousins made us cut the seder short, but everybody was ready for dinner. Brisket, meatballs, chicken, farfel kugel, salads, gf - everything was fabulous. I still wasn't feeling great, but they had a whole table of desserts and lots of fresh fruit.

Tonight is dinner with my immediate family -- chicken schnitzel, salad, mashed potatoes, cauliflower (roasted?) and dessert is a cake we bring in and sell at the store from a bakery in New York. I've baked so much this year that I don't want to eat my own stuff, and I want to try some of the stuff we bring in so I know what to order next year.

PS: For matzo balls, I do make them from scratch on occasion but they are one of the few things that I thing might actually be better from a mix. I can never get them as light as the boxed mixes (Croyden House is good).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A noble first attempt jsmeeker!  And you even got floaters!  Nicely done. :smile:

I've had two different versions of matzoh ball soup over the last two days and both were delicious.  Good strong broth, and light and fluffy knaidlach. Just as it ought to be.

I still want to attempt that dill-horseradish pistou recipe for the matzoh ball soup in the latest edition of Food & Wine.  It looks really interesting and I can never eat too much horseradish or matzoh ball soup.

I too am a horseradish lover, but the pistou from Food & Wine didn't pack the punch I had hoped. It was ok but not the really yummy addition I was looking for. Maybe that was because I make vegetarian matzoh ball soup, and it is already very vegetal.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't observe Passover (being Protestant and all) but I want to celebrate it by making matzo ball soup. I already have some home made chicken stock that I made a while back and have been keeping in the freezer.  So, really, I just need help with the matzo balls.  I'l looking back a few pages, and don't see any recipes.  I'd really like some night and light "floaters" instead of sinkers.

You got some very good advice here. I just put up a pictorial of my matzo ball making process on my blog, www.funplayingwithfood.blogspot.com. I also posted recently on making chicken soup, again with photos.

Hope they are yummy!

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" 

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A noble first attempt jsmeeker!  And you even got floaters!  Nicely done. :smile:

I've had two different versions of matzoh ball soup over the last two days and both were delicious.  Good strong broth, and light and fluffy knaidlach. Just as it ought to be.

I still want to attempt that dill-horseradish pistou recipe for the matzoh ball soup in the latest edition of Food & Wine.  It looks really interesting and I can never eat too much horseradish or matzoh ball soup.

I too am a horseradish lover, but the pistou from Food & Wine didn't pack the punch I had hoped. It was ok but not the really yummy addition I was looking for. Maybe that was because I make vegetarian matzoh ball soup, and it is already very vegetal.

That sounds right. I think the dill-horseradish pistou needs chicken stock to play against, just like regular soupe au pistou would. The vegetal broth would only seem more so with the addition of dill and horseradish, which is quite vegetal in addition to being hot and a little bitter.

Sorry it didn't work for you. :sad: I might try it later on and report back.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What makes for a truly fantastic potato kugel? I've never made one, and those I've consumed are invariably dry. I'm willing to add dairy to enrich it. I have most of the usual ingredients on hand that I imagine might go into this, except for potato starch--which I can probably buy if necessary. I even have schmaltz in the freezer. Advice?

With RecipeGullet down, I can't check the two recipes there for reference, so PMs or posts with recipes would be welcome...

The answer is the same technique that makes a truly fantastic potato latke (pancake) - use the cheese grating wheel of your food processor (or the smallest holes on your box grater) to process the potato and onion:

gallery_21337_5467_105468.jpg

Add eggs (the best quality you can get), matzo meal, salt and pepper. If it is not Passover, you can use some baking powder for fluffiness; during Passover, use a TB or two of potato starch. Also, make sure to prep the pan properly or it will stick for sure. Oil or margarine generously, then dust with matzo meal. Hope you make one that comes out yummy!

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" 

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...