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Your Daily Sweets: What are you making and baking? (2014)


Anna N
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JohnT not to be rude, but it looks mouldy...  I hope it taste divine.

Oh, it tasted (past tense) darn good! If you read the text, I said: "The photograph above is one still frozen" - what you see is frost on the chocolate. Also, they hold up very well after defrosting and the biscuit crumbs do not go soggy. John.

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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That sound  good, I think it is the mix of green and dull  brown that makes me think of mould. 

 

Great to find a dessert that doesn't  go soggy.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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I've been gluten free for a couple of months, no intolerance of any sort, just out of self experimentation. 

Yesterday I baked this coffee cake with coconut flour and honey as sweetener, very good. I used chestnut honey but I can see in the future a different honey and  a lot of orange or lemon zest.

 

GF coffee cake00001.jpeg

 

GF coffee cake00002.jpeg

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All.jpg

 

elBulli Morphings 1577 Chocolate Bars 2008

 

74% Chocolate, Milk Chocolate & Cinnamon Caramel, 74% Chocolate & Freeze Dried Blackcurrant

White Chocolate, match, and mint, 74% Chocolate & Cocoa Nibs, White Chocolate and Freeze Dried Strawberry

 

SUper easy and as good as the chocolate you use (obviously). Our favorites were the strawberry and cinnamon caramel.

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Death by chocolate cake (5 of the best chocolates Ecuador has to offer), filled with dulce-de-leche and crushed walnuts, covered with dulce-de-leche flavoured ICBM and dusted in old gold powder.  Gems are cracked Lifesavers.  Smaug the Magnificent in fire-engine red vanilla-flavoured gumpaste with a dusting of old gold.

 

Arturo was turning 10.

 

Smaug-Top-Finished.jpg

Smaug-Side-Finished.jpg

Smaug-TopSide.jpg

Smaug-DetailHead1.jpg

Smaug-Side1.jpg

Smaug-InsideHead.jpg

Smaug-Top.jpg

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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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He's the son of a good friend; when it came up to about a month before his birthday, I sat down with him and we discussed what he wanted his cake to be.  The Hobbit was the first "serious" book (by which he meant, a book where words grossly outnumber pictures) he'd ever read, and Smaug really made an impression on him.  He was furious that Peter Jackson had "gotten Smaug completely wrong visually" - so I did some sketches and we arrived on this.  He elected to save, rather than eat, the dragon.

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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I love the thought that went into this! The pictures make Smaug look a bit pink (or maybe it's just my screen non-calibration) but I see you describe it as fire-engine red and I love the gold powder detail. Love the Lifesavers as gemstones! Maybe you already said, but I'm not sure how the pearls are formed. (I think those are pearls, yes?) 

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You're talking about the gold pearls that separate the words on the board, and are lightly sprinkled into the hoard?  They're gold-leaf covered sugar decorator's dragees.  I bought them like that; if I were making them, I'd be doing a sesame core and chocolate enrobing, then blowing them with various gold powders.  I lack the requisite machinery to make my own sugar dragees.

 

If you're curious about the icing itself, which is also gold-pearly?  That's butter-yellow ICBM applied with a #2 round writing tip in individual roundish balls, then old-gold lustre dust applied with a #6 goat hair dragon calligraphy brush with all the sizing taken out of the bristles (makes it like a gigantic powder brush).

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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Elizabeth,

Your creations are just amazing. But it's your ability to imagine and then bring the imagined creature to life that amazes me the most.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I've started thinking a lot about soufflés.  This is handy because I've got about a kilo of egg whites and various fruit purées kicking around the freezer.

 

attachicon.gifBanana soufflé.jpg

 

Here's my second attempt at a dessert one, plain banana.  The structure and appearance are good, but it's way too sweet.  I adapted the recipe from a blackberry soufflé, but it has none of the sweetness or bitterness of blackberries.

Mmm, makes me want to sit down and enjoy!

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I've been busy working on a novel. However, a few days ago I did make young coconut tortillas. In Chamorro, the native language of Guam/Mariana Islands, it's called manha titiyas. It's a mixture of young coconut, coconut milk, sugar, bit of butter, and all-purpose flour.

 

YOUNG COCONUT TORTILLAS

 

manha3.jpg

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I've been busy working on a novel. However, a few days ago I did make young coconut tortillas. In Chamorro, the native language of Guam/Mariana Islands, it's called manha titiyas. It's a mixture of young coconut, coconut milk, sugar, bit of butter, and all-purpose flour.

 

YOUNG COCONUT TORTILLAS

 

manha3.jpg

 

Paula, are these typically eaten as a snack or breakfast item? They sound like a delicious type of coconut crepe (but thicker)!

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Paula, are these typically eaten as a snack or breakfast item? They sound like a delicious type of coconut crepe (but thicker)!

 

Beezee, it can be both! I've had it with a side of scrambled eggs and ketchup for breakfast three days in a row...super yummy! Most islanders eat them as a snack, just reheated in the microwave. I even tried it with a smear of Nutella...boy oh boy! 

Edited by pquinene (log)
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I've been busy working on a novel. However, a few days ago I did make young coconut tortillas. In Chamorro, the native language of Guam/Mariana Islands, it's called manha titiyas. It's a mixture of young coconut, coconut milk, sugar, bit of butter, and all-purpose flour.

 

YOUNG COCONUT TORTILLAS

 

manha3.jpg

 

I  love all things coconut.  I really want to try that!

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100 + cupcakes that my wife baked and I helped frost  for the  40th birthday of a good friend .    Maple bacon, chocolate with ganache and chocolate frosting, Vanilla with the blue frosting, Banana Rum  with banana rum frosting and butterscotch drizzle.      cool sidenote.  cupcake box liners  fit almost perfectly in  empty beer can  box flats. 

 

GEDC4912_zps935783f6.jpg

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"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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