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Regional foods in the USA


Goatjunky
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Please, do make sure that if your son lists the ingredients, he writes (or says) "au jus" and not "with au jus".   :laugh:

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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He is deadset on NY as a demonstration, and beef on weck. For approximately 40. In a classroom. But its doable, if i can figure out how to replicate the rolls

I make my own kummelweck rolls.  There is a recipe in Real American Food by Jane and Michael Stern.  If you can't find it I can pm you the recipe.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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  • 2 weeks later...

A popular bar food in South Dakota that is practically unknown elsewhere is Chislic.  it is skewered and grilled or fried lamb kabobs. Here is a link to a recipe:  http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/recipes/chislic-south-dakota-cubed-meat.html

 

In Kansas City Kansas in the Strawberry Hill area, there is or was a neighborhood that is mostly Croatian.  They, and Kansas City by association is known for Povitica bread. It is a sweet bread with a nut paste filling.

 

Strawberry Hill Povitica makes non traditional fillings as well as the original walnut filling I grew up knowing.

http://www.povitica.com/

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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I make my own kummelweck rolls.  There is a recipe in Real American Food by Jane and Michael Stern.  If you can't find it I can pm you the recipe.

I make my own as well, nothing beats these rolls! The recipe I use is from King Arthur Flour's website. Wonderful. I wish I had more room in the freezer right now so I could bake up a batch.

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I posted about a lunch I had yesterday and it reminded me about this thread.  A regional dish (spanning several states) that is loved by many folks in that multi-state region but hated, HATED, by some folks outside of that region (especially by those devoted to the Texas-type chili and other similar chilis) – is Cincinnati-style chili, a widely-known purveyor of which is Skyline Chili.

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  • 4 weeks later...

He is deadset on NY as a demonstration, and beef on weck. For approximately 40. In a classroom. But its doable, if i can figure out how to replicate the rolls

So how did it go?????? Inquiring minds want to know!

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Goatjunky, on 02 Apr 2014 - 11:59 AM, said:snapback.png

He is deadset on NY as a demonstration, and beef on weck. For approximately 40. In a classroom. But its doable, if i can figure out how to replicate the rolls

 

So how did it go?????? Inquiring minds want to know!

 

Yes, how did it go?

 

BTW, I was talking (emailing, really) to a past work colleague of mine, who used to be with Kodak in Syracuse (not that far from the Finger Lakes region ;-) ) many many years ago and he instantly recognized "beef on weck" and reminisced about those Weck Rolls, which he cannot get where he is now, of course, in the Pacific NW (nor when he was working in the same company as I did in central IN)...and about the particular combination of that GENEROUS amount of mustard and the sliced beef and the rolls...

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  • 2 years later...

This thread was started by a mom seeking to help her son with a school project on regional U.S. foods. The project is long over, but it generated a lively and interesting conversation on the subject, and I couldn't search out a better place to share this link from Wikipedia on the subject. I've been interested in this for a while, and I learned a few new things. Frogeye salad, anyone? 

 

There are lots of photos and links to more info on items that catch your fancy.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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7 hours ago, liuzhou said:

A pretty interesting read, though I'm surprised to find hot roast beef sandwiches classed as "regional."

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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8 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Indeed it is.

 

Odd that t hey caught the Zep and Schmidtter and missed cheesesteaks, roast pork with broccoli rabe, and sausage egg and cheese sandwiches from Philadelphia. These are far more common in the area.  The Zep is certainly hyper-regional, available in about a 8 mile corridor from Conshohocken to Norristown which also features an oddly sweet pizza sauce in the local places.

 

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25 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

Indeed it is.

 

Odd that t hey caught the Zep and Schmidtter and missed cheesesteaks, roast pork with broccoli rabe, and sausage egg and cheese sandwiches from Philadelphia. These are far more common in the area.  The Zep is certainly hyper-regional, available in about a 8 mile corridor from Conshohocken to Norristown which also features an oddly sweet pizza sauce in the local places.

 

According to the intro, cheesesteaks were deliberately omitted (along with muffalettas, po boys, etc) as being well enough known already. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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