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Regional foods in the USA


Goatjunky
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In his book Paddling the happy isles of Oceania, author Paul Theroux mentions that Spam is a favorite all across the region.

He claims that he was told that members of former cannibal groups swear that it tastes more like human flesh that

anything else.  In the good old days, humans destined for the cooking pots were called "long pigs."

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Speaking of garbage plates, anyone else here ever hear of the "St. Louis Sling"?  It's a breakfast delicacy popular in St. Louis diners.

 

You order whatever it is you like for breakfast - eggs however you like them, bacon or sausage or ham or whatever meat you like, hash browns or biscuits or whatever starch you want...

 

And then they sling a big ladle of chili over the whole thing.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Actually, whoever wrote that menu shortened the name. It's called 'slippery pot pie.' The upside of the dish is that no one sells the noodles that go into it, to make you have to make the noodles fresh right before serving.

 

I went to HS in PA, the cafeteria served two regional lunch dishes I never hear mentioned: corn fritters and candian bacon with maple syrup poured all over both, and, pork with sauerkraut (a pile of hot sauerkraut with pork chunks cooked in it.)

 

In Ronks, PA, it's just "pot pie" -- never saw the "slippery" part.  And I had the same experience as Annabelle years ago:  ooooh, I LOVE chicken pot pie.  And was surprised to get chicken soup with big noodles.  

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A few food specialties that are unique to my area....Cornell Chicken, Salt Potatoes and Spiedies.

 

That Cornell Chicken sounds really yummy.

 

Have you had Chicken Riggies?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_riggies

 

We went into a small restaurant in Westmoreland NY.   The waitress said the day's special was "riggies" -- when I asked her what that was, she looked at me like I was from outer space.  "It's just riggies," she said. So I ordered it and found out.  Have had them a couple of times in Utica, as well.

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That Cornell Chicken sounds really yummy.

 

Have you had Chicken Riggies?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_riggies

 

We went into a small restaurant in Westmoreland NY.   The waitress said the day's special was "riggies" -- when I asked her what that was, she looked at me like I was from outer space.  "It's just riggies," she said. So I ordered it and found out.  Have had them a couple of times in Utica, as well.

Followed your link and then linked to this:

http://www.mohawkvalleyliving.com/recipes.htm

Shrimp Riggies with vodka sound even better!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Not to beat the pot pie thing to death, but the noodles are available for sale at the supermarkets in Berks county, PA.  I have several Pennsylvania Dutch cookbooks and they have dozens of pot pie recipes.  Some will give a recipe for noodles, the newer recipes refer to a specific brand.

 

I also had a problem with the potato dish called "filling" (which it certainly is).  It looks deceptively like mashed potatoes, but also contains bread and celery.  It must be one of those things you grow up on and remember fondly.  It certainly isn't an acquired taste.

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I am loving all the responses. My son is a little overwhelmed by all the choices. Certain states have a LOT of possibilities so far and others none as of yet. He is going to pick one per state, make a map, and then do a demonstration. That state hasnt been determined yet. Anyone from Arkansas? Idaho... gotta be potatoes, but what dish?

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My favorite place in Arkansas is called Toad Suck.  Don't suppose that would make a great dish but you can't beat the name.  I too am enjoying this a lot, thanks for starting it. Be sure and let us know the winning state.

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Lots of unique food places not yet discussed. New England, Low Country, New Mexico, Carolina BBQ, Michigan, southern FL

Well, actually New Mexico has been mentioned several times, initially by me back in post #5; and I'm sure I read something about Carolina BBQ. As for Florida, I haven't read back over the whole thread, but I'm sure more than one of us said something about Key Lime Pie. And I offered up conch.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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MA might be the Clam bake, or something with lobster :  the lobster roll.

 

then again Maine might argue w that.

 

for some reason Salmon c peas comes up a lot, but Ive never had it.

 

Fried Clam Roll ( Ipswich clams ) w the bellies.

 

there there are the Boston Baked Beans, and Indian Pudding.

 

etc

Edited by rotuts (log)
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My favorite place in Arkansas is called Toad Suck.  Don't suppose that would make a great dish but you can't beat the name.  I too am enjoying this a lot, thanks for starting it. Be sure and let us know the winning state.

While on a road trip through Arkansas we drove through a town called Toad Lick. Maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but I could swear that was it. Just a few miles down the road from a town called 56.

To keep it on topic, they do some pretty good barbecue there, but I can't think of anything that is exclusive to Arkansas.

We moved to Lexington, KY a few years ago. I had never heard of Kentucky Hot Brown or Beer Cheese until I go t here.

That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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If you Google it, you will learn all about it.  The name involves large amounts of drinking at a long-gone tavern.  Sounds like whatever they

were drinking might qualify as a regional item!  No reason we can't have a beverage per state as well.

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He is going to pick one per state, make a map, and then do a demonstration. That state hasnt been determined yet. Anyone from Arkansas? Idaho... gotta be potatoes, but what dish?

What kind of cooking equipment will he have access to for the demo?

If he chooses potatoes for his demo, then keep it simple. With a microwave, he can easily make mashed potatoes from scratch.

Pre-wash the potatoes and dry them before bringing them to the demo. Just remember to pierce the potatoes before nuking so they won't explode in the microwave from the inner steam. 

For the demo, nuke them, peel (or don't peel them...it depends on the kid...some won't go near mashed potatoes with the skins mashed in. Using thin-skinned red rose potatoes is ideal for a quick mash...you barely notice the skins) and mash the 'taters. Nuke the milk and butter til warm, mix into the mashed potatoes and add salt & pepper. Done.

If he's using something like a Russet (with its thicker skin), he can do what the cooking shows do and pre-cook some potatoes before his demo starts so they will be cool enough for him to peel them for the demo.

Have him practice at home making the recipe. The amount of milk needed will be ballpark, since every potato is different when mashed and sometimes he won't need it all, other times he will, depending on how thin/thick he wants the mashed potatoes.

Easy peasy. 

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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So far we've been talking about popular Western foods. If your son is interested in Native American foods, the Arkansas Archaeological Survey has put out a paper on that topic, with modernized recipes at the end. (I realize this may be more than your son wanted to get into, though it does go "past the expected.")

http://www.uark.edu/campus-resources/archinfo/Native%20American%20Food.pdf
 

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I checked the Time/Life series and a couple of other books I have from the mid-20th century on American regional foods and didn't come up with huge amounts of stuff (eta, well on many states, yes, but not Arkansas and Idaho):

 

Arkansas -- Catfish stew, sweet potato casserole with marshmallow topping, sweet potato pie, baked possum (!), poke salad, hush puppies (lots of this is generic Southern food, obviously)

 

Idaho -- Panned or grilled rainbow trout, potato doughnuts, double-baked potatoes with cheese, lamb chops, huckleberry pie -- lots of lamb in Idaho from the Basques who settled there.

 

I'm trying to find my Clementine Paddleford (How America Eats) but she's disappeared somewhere in the stacks -- there is a new edition out "The Great American Cookbook" which you might find locally somewhere. 

 

I do have a couple of Nebraska local old-fashioned cookbooks so I could look there if you're still trying for Nebraska.  :)

Edited by SylviaLovegren (log)
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Try googling "beef on weck california". Perhaps one of those restaurants can ship rolls to you, or suggest a supplier. Any Eastern European delis/bakeries in Palm Springs? Perhaps they may have suggestions.

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Beef on weck must be popular in far western NY because I was born in western NY and I've lived in the immediate area my entire life and I've never heard of it in this area.

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

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I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

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