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teonzo

Francisco Migoya starting a project with Nathan Myhrvold

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In Pãstryrevolution #5 (a great magazine on pastries and bread, if you can read Spanish language) there is an interview with Francisco Migoya where he says he is starting a project with Nathan Myhrvold. This seems like the beginning of the works for "Modernist Patisserie".

This is a great news for me, an equivalent of "Modernist Cuisine" for pastry and baking would be a dream!

 

 

 

Teo

 

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My new blog: http://www.teonzo.com/

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an equivalent of "Modernist Cuisine" for pastry and baking would be a dream!

Agreed. I still can't bring myself to spend the money for the MC books but I might find a MP book impossible to resist.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I was surprised pastry wasn't included in the original set. I know they had to draw the line somewhere ... but the distinction between sweet and savory or hot kitchen and pastry kitchen sems decidedly pre-modern. At any rate, I look forward to 50lbs of pastry volumes.

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