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Dinner! 2014 (Part 2)


robirdstx
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It looks like you used a Shanghainese form of "year-cake", and made a dish in the Shanghainese idiom.   I'm sure you must know that "rice cakes" and "year-cakes" have many variations across the regions of China, and what you used is quite unlike Cantonese 年糕/nin4 gao1.  FWIW, in my mind the term "(Chinese) rice cakes" could mean various sorts of things other than "year-cakes". ;-)  Any pics of the other chinese rice cakes (and resulting dishes) you've been playing around with?

My mistake calling these rice cakes chinese...the actual brand was korean.

My husband is in fact Shanghainese and a typical recipe would be to stir try the rice cakes with crabs and their roe. It has happened that I've borrowed something from shanghaise dishes that I like and turned them into Italian or French. These rice cakes I made with green beans, yellow cauliflower and cherry tomatoes, parsley; spring onion, bacon and edamame, chillies; mushrooms, bacon and shallots.

I tried the sweet water chestnut cake and love the texture fried. I'm thinking on how to turn it into a savory snack.

I have a korean radish in the fridge that is going to become something like a "gatto' di patate" or croquettes.

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Patrickamory: we love chicken dopiaza! Sounds like crazy amount of onions, but so necessary. I like the bits you have on top of the chicken. 

 

Made oven baked parmesan / panko coated chicken for supper. The crust was crispy, and the chicken was moist. We ate this with a whole mess of stir-fried vegetables.

 

Parmesan Chicken0574.jpg

 

ParmesanChicken Upclose0577.jpg

 

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Doing an event tonight for 30 people.. Private party.. Big drinkers, younger crowd.  

 

Amuse

  •  

 

Kale, Pomegranate Arils, Hazelnuts, Gorgonzola, Lemon Creme Fraiche

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Roasted Marrow, Parsnip Purée, Blood Orange & Rosemary Gastrique, Bien Cuit Toast

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Spring Pea & Ricotta Ravioli, Crispy Pancetta, Provolone Brodo

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Bell's Kalamazoo Stout Braised Short Rib, Maple & Horseradish Glaze, Creamed Polenta, Jus

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Cheese Plate, Truffle Honey, Toasts

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Grand Marnier & Masarpone Cheesecake, Burnt Caramel, Sea Salt

 

I will try to take photos.. so far alls i got is a pancetta pick for the ravioli

 

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Edited by basquecook (log)
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“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

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Franci: I like that idea of pairing the rice cakes with the clams and lobster! I've only eaten it stir-fried with vegetables. You may have known this as "nian goh" because Toisanese families typically made these for Lunar New Year. My Mom used to make piles of these in small balls or oblong pieces. They were kept in water in a cool place to be used for the next couple of weeks. Mom would bring some out, slice the thicker ones, then fry 'em up. SO delicious. Now, one can buy the dried ones, rehydrate, then cook accordingly.

 

Huiray, of course, is thinking of the sweet version eaten as cake, sweet and sticky. These are also made for Lunar New Year. We always made one according to tradition, but none of us really enjoyed it.

 

I was really happy to have made the halibut two ways, Ann_T and Kim. Let me know how you liked it, Kim.

 

Kim: Do you have the recipe for Kalua pork or a link to the recipe on line? I have banana leaves, pork and slow cooker. Sounds like something to have ready for when the kids come home for Easter.

Here you go: http://www.pineappleandcoconut.com/recipes/hawaiian-style-slow-cooker-kalua-pork/

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Last night we finally got to make the dinner we had planned for St. Patty's day.  Corned beef and cabbage with carrots.  The beef (a store-bought pre-corned beef brisket) was made sous vide - 10 hours at 180F.  The carrots were pre-cooked.  Then the meat juice and the majority of the spices were mixed with cabbage and carrots and heated until the cabbage started to soften.

 

corned-beef-cabbage.jpg

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

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"""   the meat juice and the majority of the spices were mixed with cabbage and carrots and heated until the cabbage started to soften. ""

 

fine idea.  ill steal  borrow it.

 

how did you like the CB's at 180 ?

 

I still have a large CB project to finish after I finish my taxes.

 

My CB's are destined for sandwich, which i de-salt a bit, SV, then smoke at 130 on the Weber, re-bag and freeze

 

there is nothing quite like a properly prepared  'Corned Beef Dinner'  true all cultures, at lest in the West, have a

 

'Pot - beef veg simmer' dinner

 

I plan to save 2 or so of the CB's I have and try to do I higher temp CB as you have done.

 

Id like to take PedroG's  suggestions on time and temp to 'dissolve' the local connective tissue first at a lower temp..

 

then go to the higher temp w the expectations that the meat would not contract so much as the contractive items are

 

now 'gelatin'

 

so  .... how was that CB in terms of tenderness, and 'mouth feel?

 

not that this is relevant to anyone but me, but this time i plan to save all the fat from the CB's which I cut off and use that

 

in a layer-ing over the potatoes, carrots, and cabbage  in the future.

 

it might add flavor as it melts to the veg. similar to cooking the veg in the CB 'water'

 

thanks for your post 

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Patrickamory: we love chicken dopiaza! Sounds like crazy amount of onions, but so necessary. I like the bits you have on top of the chicken. 

 

Made oven baked parmesan / panko coated chicken for supper. The crust was crispy, and the chicken was moist. We ate this with a whole mess of stir-fried vegetables.

 

Gotta admit, that chicken does look very moist. And the breading looks quite good. Unusually good for baked chicken tenders. Care to share your secret? Brine?

Edited by Morkai (log)
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Gotta admit, that chicken does look very moist. And the breading looks quite good. Unusually good for baked chicken tenders. Care to share your secret? Brine?

 

Morkai: I brushed the chicken pieces with mayo, then coated the entire piece with seasoned panko crumbs and grated Parmesan cheese. These were chicken quarters, bone in. Baked in a 425F oven for 20 minutes. The recipe I found said to mix the mayo with the cheese, coat the chicken,  then sprinkle crumbs on top. I didn't read carefully, and I mixed the cheese in with the crumbs. But I think it worked better!

 

Tonight: SPRING CHICKEN! The first chicken of spring in the Big Easy. Kaffir lime leaves stuffed under the skin. Also made nasi lemak (coconut milk, lemongrass and a touch of turmeric), and sayur lemak (Malay-style vegetables simmered in curry paste and coconut milk)

 

Spring Chicken0578.jpg

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Robirdstx,  great looking burger.  If I hadn't got a head start on dinner already, that is what I would be having tonight.

 

Patrickamory,  Chicken Dopiaza, was not a dish I was familiar with.   But as soon as I saw your pictures, I knew it would be something that we would love.  Especially Moe.  He loves onions.  So thanks to you I have dinner almost cooked.

 

Chicken%20Dopiaza%20April%205th%2C%20201

 

I am working today so I got started early.

 

Chicken%20Dopiaza%20%20Onions%20April%20

 

When I get home tonight, all I have to do is  add the onions,  reheat and make the sides.   Thank you.

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Ann_T - looks like it was delicious! Only downside is the house does smell of onions for a few days… whew! 

 

Patrick, I'll let you know. Just put it on to simmer this morning before leaving for work.  We will be having it for dinner tonight.

 

 

Could be worse ;).

 

I agree Scubadoo.

 

 

~Ann

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image.jpg

Chicken paillard with panko/parmesan/lemon zest coating and a salad of shaved fennel, grated carrot, slivered Belgian endive dressed with lemon juice and walnut oil and a tiny drizzle of maple syrup.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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awesome short ribs. yum yum.

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Ramp pesto.

The version above contains hazelnuts instead of walnuts.

Recipe: http://food52.com/recipes/4341-wild-ramp-pesto


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Baby mesclun, roasted asparagus, farm egg


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Squid, with spelt and barley pilaf


This

13658563194_39a5f9a5aa_z.jpg

is a mixture of barley, spelt, lentils and green split peas that had been soaked in cold water for one hour, then drained. That was simmered with 2 cups water and a pinch of sea salt for 30 minutes, partly covered, then combined with a battutina (celery/carrot/onion/celery leaves/Italian parsley) cooked in olive oil, and seasoned with sea salt and black pepper. I reserved about a tablespoon of the battutina and used that as the base for the squid.

Squid: 1/2 lb. squid, thinly sliced, then lightly sprinkled with sea salt. Set aside for 5 minutes. Warm olive oil in a pan, add chopped garlic and chopped Italian parsley, fry until garlic turns a pale gold. Add squid to the pan, cook until squid turns color. Taste for salt and pepper. Stir in the juice of half a lemon, then serve with ramp pesto.

 

(I normally use garlic but I changed my mind this time)

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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Ann_T and patrickamory: re- smell of cooking onions and whatever elses that lingers - I find if I simmer vinegar and water for about 30 minutes, it really cleans the air. I did that tonight after deep frying Inche Kiban - Malaysian Fried Chicken

 

Inche Kabin UpClose0598.jpg

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Ann_T and patrickamory: re- smell of cooking onions and whatever elses that lingers - I find if I simmer vinegar and water for about 30 minutes, it really cleans the air. I did that tonight after deep frying Inche Kiban - Malaysian Fried Chicken

 

attachicon.gifInche Kabin UpClose0598.jpg

 

Dejah, please give more information about that vinegar and water simmering trick. Does it also work against the smell of deep-fat frying, or - in general - the smell of too-hot fat?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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The dish is Inche KABIN (not Kiban), as the picture label correctly says.  Also spelled as Inchi Kabin.  It is Malaysian, yes, but more accurately Penang Nyonya - as distinguished from Ayam Goreng, also "Malaysian" (and Indonesian), but more associated with the Malays in the latter case.  The spices used are slightly different and the methods are not the same.  Inche Kabin is double-fried.  Ayam Goreng is usually single-fried, and sometimes (especially the Indonesian version) simmered with spices in water till the water is gone then deep-frying.

 

But of course they can both be called "Malaysian fried chicken".  :-)

Edited by huiray (log)
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Hi Smithy: I use the simmering vinegar and water to clear the smell of deep fat frying or any kind of strong cooking odour. My kitchen is open to all areas of the main floor and up to my bedroom, so it's really important to "clean the air" in the winter (when I cannot open doors and windows at -40C  temps!) so I can sleep.  I told a friend the trick once but she thought it was straight vinegar. That definitly worked well!

 

huiray: I must have been typing with a Toisanese accent...yes...it IS Inche Kabin. If anyone tried to google Inche Kiban, of course, it would say " do you mean Inche Kabin". Don't think it will direct the reader to Ayam Goreng :rolleyes: .

 

And yes, it is Penang Nyonya and double fried. We were introduced to this "fried chicken" on our trip to Malaysia last spring.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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