• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

robirdstx

Dinner! 2014 (Part 2)

588 posts in this topic

grilled lamb shoulder chop, roasted lemon potato, shrimp saganaki,  tzatzikiGEDC4388_zpscd169547.jpg


Edited by Ashen (log)
2 people like this

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had a lambs head soaking In a garlic and cumin run for two days. Today, I took the head out, placed in a cast iron pot with lid, threw in a bag of rancho Gordon black beans, one leek, avocado leaves, a tube of tomato paste, a leftover 3/4 bottle of cider, leftover baby carrots, Bay leaves, cloves, cinnamon and some garlic. Added some water to cover the beans. Cooked for like 4 or 5 hours at 325.

I can't wait to eat this. Had some beans as I was cooking. The house smells so good, the beans are perfect. So delicious

 

there is a lot of liquid at the bottom.. tomorrow i will remove the meat from the head and it will just look like a regular pot of beans.  


14021879316_3f29e5a90b_z.jpg


Edited by basquecook (log)
5 people like this

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duck & pickled mustard soup.  (鹹菜鴨湯)

 

Tonight's version made w/ skin-on fat-on duck leg quarters, pickled mustard (wet, in packages; soaked in water then squeezed out), de-skinned tomatoes [Racconto], sliced ginger, goji berries, sea salt, rice vinegar, hon mirin [Takara].

 

Being cooked.

DSCN1323b_800.jpg

 

Served.

DSCN1329a_800.jpg

 

7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Beef with beer and onions (The Country Cooking of France by Anne Willan) and some home-made bread.

11 people like this

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This morning, added the a 8 more ounces of cider, added some water, brought to a boil, skimmed off the top and have it cooking on low for a couple of hours..  

 

Not as scary this way.. Eyes and tongue and all are in there.   

 

14046671821_5ff0bb6df1_z.jpg


Edited by basquecook (log)
3 people like this

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Duck & pickled mustard soup.  (鹹菜鴨湯)

 

Tonight's version made w/ skin-on fat-on duck leg quarters, pickled mustard (wet, in packages; soaked in water then squeezed out), de-skinned tomatoes [Racconto], sliced ginger, goji berries, sea salt, rice vinegar, hon mirin [Takara].

 

Being cooked.

attachicon.gifDSCN1323b_800.jpg

 

Served.

attachicon.gifDSCN1329a_800.jpg

 

I forgot - some sour plums (flesh partially ripped apart) also went in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This morning, added the a 8 more ounces of cider, added some water, brought to a boil, skimmed off the top and have it cooking on low for a couple of hours..

Not as scary this way.. Eyes and tongue and all are in there.

14046671821_5ff0bb6df1_z.jpg

I'll bet that's going to be good, although perhaps still a bit startling depending on the answers to these questions:

Do the eyes remain intact, a la the second Indiana Jones movie?

and

Is the brain in there also? If so, what would be its texture by now?

2 people like this

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today my housemate made us dal. Very spicy!  He couldn't really cook anything when we moved in; now I feel quite aggrieved if there's no delicious curry on the stove come evening. :biggrin:

 

I make him dinner too, sometimes...

 

002 (640x480).jpg


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

two separate meals tonight. miss k and a had salmon and sweet potatoes.. two more ingredients on her list. i had lamb stew over rice with some ramps thrown in..

in terms of the eye ball or the consistency, i gave miss K, a fork full of perhaps 1/6 of the eye on it with some rice.. She ate it and loved it.. i have yet to tell her what she had.. She wants this for dinner tomorrow night.

14070395784_b6f2e7895b_z.jpg


Edited by basquecook (log)
5 people like this

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

This is becoming one of my favourite beef dishes. Tri tip cooked sous-vide (54.5 x 6 hrs) and here served with sauteed portobellos.

8 people like this

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel so bad I forgot our wedding anniversary today...we where supposed to pick up some bone in aged rib eye steak from heritage meats at Essex mkt but the butcher didn't call. Of course my husband remembered because of the meat. Well, it's raining, hopefully we can have it soon on the grill.

I made this baciocca ( let's called a sort of Italian cornbread with onions and potatoes), very easy and very tasty, some salad and shrimp skewers for my husband, duck soup with broken capelli d'angelo for the children.

image.jpg

8 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AnnaN:  if you can get it whole, try sirloin tip vs tri-tip exactly as you have done.  most butchers will trip out a whole sirloin tip rather then do the thick slices you see in the meat case.

 

interested in your thoughts on this other cut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13884691578_07007b694a_z.jpg

French breakfast radishes, chive mayonnaise

13884683837_58e83e431a_z.jpg

Mâche, sucrine and herb salad, shallot vinaigrette.

Salad: mâche, sucrine, baby mesclun, sorrel, mint leaves, parsley leaves, oregano leaves

Vinaigrette: mince some shallots, then sprinkle a pinch of salt on them and macerate in: 1 tablespoon red wine, 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, for 5 minutes. Whisk in 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil and taste for black pepper. Use as needed.

14068095641_11b119f022_z.jpg

Roast chicken with sorrel stuffing (stuffed the chicken with sorrel leaves, seasoned with sea salt and black pepper); broccoli rabe, with anchovy, garlic and red wine vinegar


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the sorrel leach a lot of liquid inside the bird?

 

And breakfast radishes? For dinner! 

 

quelle horreur -  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh: 

We didn't notice any. (I should mention that dinner pictured above was for two people.)

There was a hint of a lemony flavor, which is all that was needed. Not much "liquid" either. The pic doesn't show but there were some solid leaves left.

ps. the radishes -- were also served with sea salt, unsalted butter and farm bread.

pps. you'll see more later tonight.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel so bad I forgot our wedding anniversary today...we where supposed to pick up some bone in aged rib eye steak from heritage meats at Essex mkt but the butcher didn't call. Of course my husband remembered because of the meat. Well, it's raining, hopefully we can have it soon on the grill.

I made this baciocca ( let's called a sort of Italian cornbread with onions and potatoes), very easy and very tasty, some salad and shrimp skewers for my husband, duck soup with broken capelli d'angelo for the children.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Would you share the baciocca recipe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

And breakfast radishes? For dinner! 

 

quelle horreur -  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh: 

 

I use "French Breakfast Radishes" in any number of ways.  By themselves, in pickles, in stews, in braises, in roasts, in salads, anywhere a radish-like ingredient with the characteristics it has - complimentary to or in place of other radishes such as daikon etc etc might be used, or as an abetting of other radishes I might use.  There is no requirement that I use it for breakfast only, as the name is wont to suggest. 

 

I'm sure you are speaking tongue in cheek, but even so it is still of note that the notion would even be floated whether in jest or not that "French Breakfast Radishes" are for breakfast (together, no doubt, with the requisite egg in some form or other) and for no other time - in an oblique way of suggesting that (speaking in a broad sense) certain foodstuffs are appropriate for breakfast, or lunch, or dinner, and never the twain shall meet, according to folks who hold to such things.  They are free to feel that way, of course, and it is possible that they feel that such things give a certain structure to one's daily meals.  However, other folks may consider ANY foodstuff to be fair game for ANY meal whenever that meal is consumed and one should be cognizant that the imposition of expectations of the use of foodstuffs for meals on other folks may not be entirely valid.  Why not simply take in what folks post about what they ate at a particular time of day or for a particular meal, without dissing the choice of ingredients for said meal? Or apologizing for "having breakfast for dinner", as another facet of this phenomenon? Just simply say you had an omelette and bacon for dinner, for example, rather than going into some spiel about having breakfast (whatever that is) for dinner (whatever THAT is).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you share the baciocca recipe?

 

For an 11 inch skillet, I mixed in a bowl 50 g AP flour, 50 g fine cornmeal, added 1 teaspoon salt, a medium/big potato and a medium onion (sliced with the thicker disc of my magimix, so 4 mm) and added enough heavy cream to wet the flours, maybe a little more than half of small carton, it's sticky. Oil a cast iron skillet, spread the mixture evenly (should be no more than a finger in height) drizzle some more oil  and bake at 400 F until it forms a nice crust at the bottom, it's golden on top and the potatoes are cooked through, about 45-50 minutes.

I  also think the leftover re crisped are terrific in the morning with some eggs and bacon.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use "French Breakfast Radishes" in any number of ways.  By themselves, in pickles, in stews, in braises, in roasts, in salads, anywhere a radish-like ingredient with the characteristics it has - complimentary to or in place of other radishes such as daikon etc etc might be used, or as an abetting of other radishes I might use.  There is no requirement that I use it for breakfast only, as the name is wont to suggest. 

 

I'm sure you are speaking tongue in cheek, but even so it is still of note that the notion would even be floated whether in jest or not that "French Breakfast Radishes" are for breakfast (together, no doubt, with the requisite egg in some form or other) and for no other time - in an oblique way of suggesting that (speaking in a broad sense) certain foodstuffs are appropriate for breakfast, or lunch, or dinner, and never the twain shall meet, according to folks who hold to such things.  They are free to feel that way, of course, and it is possible that they feel that such things give a certain structure to one's daily meals.  However, other folks may consider ANY foodstuff to be fair game for ANY meal whenever that meal is consumed and one should be cognizant that the imposition of expectations of the use of foodstuffs for meals on other folks may not be entirely valid.  Why not simply take in what folks post about what they ate at a particular time of day or for a particular meal, without dissing the choice of ingredients for said meal? Or apologizing for "having breakfast for dinner", as another facet of this phenomenon? Just simply say you had an omelette and bacon for dinner, for example, rather than going into some spiel about having breakfast (whatever that is) for dinner (whatever THAT is).

I'm sure Mitch was joking; that was my impression, in any event.

As for the radishes, that's what they're called. I suppose I have could said "heirloom radishes", but I thought I'd provide a little more information by providing the name they're usually known by.

Moving on...

My experience with making the mayonnaise for the oeufs mayo from "My Paris Kitchen" was so successful that it's become my default recipe for mayonnaise, and I've started to branch out. This is probably a not a revelation to many of you who have been making your own mayonnaise either by hand or by machine, but for someone like me who only rarely makes his own which is then promptly consumed, it's bordering on practically obsession. :blink::wub:

I made a batch of chive mayonnaise (basically the same recipe that David gives for the tarragon version, but I substituted 1 tablespoon of minced chives and 1/2 tablespoon each finely chopped Italian parsley and celery leaves); this is what accompanied the radish plate and will also appear as one of the sauces for the crudités plate tonight.

One of the items I bought from USGM was chickweed which will most likely be the "green" for the salad course. It's an adaptation of a Jean-Georges Vongerichten recipe; the original calls for chickweed tossed with a vinaigrette of hazelnut oil, lemon juice, sea salt and black pepper. The proportion of oil to acid is 2:1; if made correctly, it highlights the faint sweetness of the chickweed while providing a nutty background flavor and a slight acidity by the lemon juice. I have some leftover sorrel which will also appear in the salad. Typically, sorrel is used to accompany fish, but I'm trying to find creative uses for it in order to expand my horizons; it's what happens when you cook seasonally; and anyway, I like a good challenge.

The main will be a pasta, featuring squid, ramps and toasted breadcrumbs.

More later.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franci :

 

"""  finger in height """  

 

not quite sure what this means:  one knuckle ?  

 

but sounds delicious  

 

might work well in the BV-XL  !


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franci :

 

"""  finger in height """  

 

not quite sure what this means:  one knuckle ?  

 

but sounds delicious  

 

might work well in the BV-XL  !

 

Sorry Rotuts, my husband makes fun of me sometimes... I literally translate from Italian to English and then I discover it doesn't work all the times :biggrin: Just don't make it too thick, let's say no more than 1 inch.

I'm sure it would work really well in your BV-XL. Let me know how it turns out.


Edited by Franci (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know all there is to know about French, or about breakfast, but I've never noticed French people call French Breakfast Radishes either French or Breakfast - they're just called radishes. And they're not eaten for breakfast. Cigarettes are :biggrin:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franci:   this combo-AP flour- cornmeal- etc  Rx looks like quite a winner

 

lots of possible add-ins:  a little crispy bacon  etc

 

i dont keep heavy cream, i generally sub in a fresh goat cheese + non-fat milk mixture mixed to the consistency of heavy cream

 

same volume   that this generally works, but sometimes 'splits' or cooks a bit differently

 

its tart which I like  

 

once I get re-supplied from Tj's on the Goat Ch.  Ill give it a try

 

like the flavor of cornmeal

 

many thanks !   great idea Id never though of !

 

kudos your way !

 

:biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.