• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

robirdstx

Dinner! 2014 (Part 2)

588 posts in this topic

Patrick, I have no doubt that your meatballs were delicious but it's really a curious recipe, I've never heard of a rinsed meat. I do love pecorino in meatballs, it's so southerner. Unfortunately also in the South of Italy people are turning into parmigiano because it's milder. My cheese adverse children are not used to it. I need to go and buy some pecorino now.

We had tri tip and some lamb chops on the grill, some green and bruschetta/ focaccia

image.jpg

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scubadoo - You are too kind! I am digging the new job so far, thanks for asking.

 

Thai tonight: beef grapao/kaprow/”kapow” with garlic paste, chiles, onions, fish sauce, dark soy sauce, rice vinegar, and lots of Thai basil. Napa cabbage stir-fried with more garlic, fermented bean paste, and brown sugar. Jasmine rice.

 

p621286960-4.jpg

7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franci it is indeed a curious recipe. I made more of the tomato sauce today and reheated the remaining meatballs, and they were even better. I'll post an adaptation of the recipe in RecipeGullet because I suspect what makes it work is the proportions, ingredients and attention to details. (Who knows whether the rinsing step is essential - I will skip it and see whether it makes a difference.) This time I remembered to grate extra pecorino and tear some basil leaves before serving. Photo below.

 

Bruce so good to see you back at Thai cooking!

 

meatballs.jpg

7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 (Who knows whether the rinsing step is essential - I will skip it and see whether it makes a difference.)

 

I'm picturing the grandma who originated this recipe laughing into her sleeve as she tells bigshot American chef grandson to start washing his mince...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@patrickamory, I was curious about this meatball recipe and went looking for it on the Boston Globe website too.  I located what must be the recipe in the archives, "Meatballs with tomato sauce", posted in August 2009 and listed as "adapted from Il Casale".  Would that be the one?  The recipe I have says 1/4 cup olive oil for te sauce; and 1/2 cup olive oil for the meatballs - I suppose that is where your 3/4 cup of olive oil comes from, as the total?  (It also uses canned San Marzano tomatoes)

 

As for the rinsing of the meat, I see it says "In a colander under cold running water, rinse the beef and pork".  Hmm, I dunno - in my experience ground beef (more than ground pork) often "leaks" a pinkish liquid, presumably myoglobin plus residual blood (if any) plus whatever else, especially supermarket ground beef that has been frozen then defrosted, and I sometimes even squeeze it lightly to get rid of this before frying it up.. Curdled stuff results if I do not.  Perhaps that is the origin of the "rinsing the ground meat"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hurray that is the recipe. I triangulated a bit from discussions with the server at the restaurant, but yes, that's where the 3/4 cup of olive oil comes from. And yes, canned San Marzano - emphasized by the waiter. I used Danicoop.

 

As for the meat, I used ground beef and ground pork from Eataly. The beef is Pat LaFrieda, for what that's worth. And it certainly leaked a certain amount of pinkish liquid. Did it concentrate flavor? Make the meatballs more moist? Not certain. Perhaps the nonna is laughing into her sleeve as Plantes Vertes suggests. My guess is that as odd as this step is, it's not the most important part of the prep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a notion as to the reason for the rinsing. I am not claiming it is the reason only , that I find it an interesting possible explanation .   Texture.     Is it possible that it is rinsing away some of the  myosin protein released by grinding,   makes for a more tender meatball?    I doubt the Nonna knew why specifically it worked, only noted that it did ,and continued to make it a part of her meatball process. 


Edited by Ashen (log)

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ashen I was wondering whether that was the reason for the rinsing too. These meatballs are spectacularly tender.

 

For those interested, I have posted the Il Casale recipe to RecipeGullet:

 

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/147637-meatballs-il-casale-polpette-di-nonna/

 

Note: I used the best ingredients possible - Danicoop San Marzanos, Fulvi pecorino romano, Ronnybrook farm whole milk with the cream on top, ground pork and Pat LaFrieda ground beef from Eataly, Penzey's Greek oregano, Alya olive oil, sea salt, and Montosco chili pepper flakes. Except the eggs - they were normal supermarket eggs. The guy at the restaurant told me that good ingredients were critical to this dish.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dinner last night:

image.jpg

Chicken "Cabo" Salad - From left to right: Chopped Black Olives, Hard Cooked Egg, Chicken Fajita Meat and Tomatoes, Shredded Cheeses, Crumbled Bacon and Diced Avocado over a bed of Chopped Romaine. Served with Ranch Dressing on the side.


Edited by robirdstx (log)
10 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fried Pasta--Fried Polenta-with a Pork Bone Sugo Sauce

Pork Neck Bone meat is awesome--Not much meat but very flavorful

 

Polenta, Pork Neck Bones and Fried Pasta.jpg

 

 

11 people like this

Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yum  Yum

 

that being said

 

** burp **

 

im not clear what's on that plate:  by fried do you mean cooked pasta and polenta sauted a bit for an outer crunch?

 

thats what i see on the R

 

on the L  is that the neck bone meat ?   should you do this again, Id love to see what a cut into that looks like

 

to see the interior of the 'meat/

 

still  Yum Yum   Id order this at a Rest.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah  RT

 

The pasta has a bit of egg  and the white polenta ( i pour on a sheet pan and set over might )  cut and fry slowly.

 

Pork neck bones I got from the Asain market--  Maybe next time I'll get a meat shot (  For some reason that just sounds wierd )  :shock::rolleyes:


Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Caramelized onion and Roquefort tart from Anne Willan's The Country Cooking of France with a side of greens and walnuts.

9 people like this

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lobster, blanquette of green vegetables, coral sauce

Z55nTWn.png

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late dinner:

Tai Yee Ma Kar Lui” (大姨媽嫁女).

 

DSCN1314a_800.jpg

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick dinner – shrimp with slowly-fried garlic, cumin, smoked paprika, Aleppo peppers, S&P, lemon juice, and Thai basil. Tossed with spaghetti and served with green salad.

 

p551057320-4.jpg

9 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yum Franci and Bruce - spring is here. (I presume that was dried Aleppo pepper btw Bruce? I haven't seen it fresh or pickled.)

 

I made cremini and asparagus risotto, pictures tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yum Franci and Bruce - spring is here. (I presume that was dried Aleppo pepper btw Bruce? I haven't seen it fresh or pickled.)

 

I made cremini and asparagus risotto, pictures tomorrow.

 

Thanks, Patrick! Yes, crushed dried Aleppo peppers. 

 

Looking forward to seeing your risotto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another simple dinner.

Beef pastrami,* eggs with Western chives, crusty baguette,* sliced scallions, pickled Japanese cucumbers & scallion w/ toasted sesame seeds.

 

* from Goose the Market.

 

DSCN1322a_800.jpg


Edited by huiray (log)
5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asparagus and cremini risotto

 

risotto.jpg

9 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already had this in the smoker yesterday when Charlie reminded me we had been invited to my nephew's house for a Bacon and Bourbon party. I took one slab to the party and the rest went in the refrigerator. This is a picture I took today to show what was in the smoker. The navy beans for Easter first became smoked baked beans then those leftovers became BBQ beans for the ribs and brisket. I used apple wood in the smoker.  Ribs were finished in a spicy BBQ sauce that had a little pineapple flavored balsamic vinegar added. It is not good picture. The meats look kind of dry but they weren't.

     Slaw is store bought.

 

For the Bacon and Bourbon party, Cassie made bacon and chocolate chip cookies and bacon wrapped asparagus with a bourbon sauce.

 

DSCN1399_zps2ae412fa.jpg


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished My Dish-- Wild Salmon ( caught by my Patient ) with a Morel Mushroom Cream Sauce and Sabarot Le Puy green Lentils

Cheers ALL and Happy Foraging

 

Salmon w Morel Cream Sauce.jpg

 

 

10 people like this

Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.