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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 1)


paulraphael
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I have 2 SV machines. A SV supreme and an Anova 1.0  . 

 

The SVS lives in the cellar and gets the most usage, esp for long incubations.  The Anova is used less because it takes up a lot of counterspace and only fits into a humongous pot/cambro.

 

So to answer most literally, I don';t use the circulator much.

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Interestingly (or not?) it's the opposite for me.

 

because of its footprint (and because I don't think it works nearly as well) my SVS hasn't been used since I got the Anova, and so it sits on a shelf out of the way.

 

The Anova is also stored on a shelf as are the various Cambros and containers, but it's not a big deal for me to pull them out and use as needed.

 

once set up,the 12l Cambro is about the same footrprint as the SVS, but it doesn't have to sit out on the counter all the time.

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Just bagged four boneless skinless chicken breasts each with a tablespoon or so of butter and will let them go for an hour to an hour and a half at 60°C. Now I am desperately trying to find my instructions for putting a coating on the breasts before searing them. It worked brilliantly. I seem to recall it involved flour and cornstarch.

Edited to add

I found it! If anyone is interested I will attempt to post a link.

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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So I'm preparing some turkey breast for a mole dish tomorrow. Oddly the only turkey breast available here is "thinly sliced"... that won't affect my regular cook times and temperatures will it? Seems like when it's all vacuum sealed it shouldn't make a difference.

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Thanks. That's the one. I have just found it myself when you posted. Have you tried it?

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hosting a cocktail party next weekend for my birthday, and doing some of the prep work this weekend.   A couple of the appetizers that I'm planning to do sous-vide:

 

- Kalua style pork.  Hopefully I'll be able to find some banana leaves today.  Mixing in some alderwood smoked sea salt with the red Hawaiian salt to try and get some of the smokey flavour.  Any advice on time/temp, and when I should do the seasoning?  It will be served on toast squares with a pineapple salsa/gremolata

 

- Spanish influenced "sliders".  Sous-vided, torched and then dusted with paprika.  Served on a saffron brioche mini-bun with arugula and maybe an aioli.  I'm torn on this one.  A lot of the guests will balk at more than a tinge of pink in their burgers.  

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I think I'm 3/5 for leaks on my last few cooks, either a sharp edge of a bone or the seal fails or something else. Paranoia is setting in, laying up at night wondering if it's leaking. 

 

not sure if I've got a plan to safeguard against this. 

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Back in post # 90 I told my sad story about having to throw out some beef short ribs due to a leak. Ever since, whenever I cook something that has bony pointy ends that can puncture the bag I double vacuum bag them. Right now I have some beef short ribs going that will be finished at 5:00 today and they are double bagged.

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What are you using for bags?

 

ziploc heavy duty large freezer bags. I usually put a clip across the top so I don't need to rely on the zip for sealing, but didn't last night out of complacency I guess. I suppose I could start double bagging, bug I'm already a bit conflicted about wasting ONE bag nevermind two

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Interesting. I think I've only had one leak ever. If you decide to double-bag, is there any reason you could reuse the outer bag indefinitely? It's only coming in contact with food if the inner bag fails.

 

no I suppose no real reason you couldn't reuse the outer bag. Or reuse the inner bag after washing, for that matter. 

 

I guess I have some paranoia (most likely unfounded) about plastics breaking down and leeching after being subjected to heat for extended periods of time

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ziploc heavy duty large freezer bags. I usually put a clip across the top so I don't need to rely on the zip for sealing, but didn't last night out of complacency I guess. I suppose I could start double bagging, bug I'm already a bit conflicted about wasting ONE bag nevermind two

I too was conflicted about using two bags until I had to throw out those beautiful beef short ribs. What I paid for them would have purchased a lot of bags.

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Back in post # 90 I told my sad story about having to throw out some beef short ribs due to a leak. Ever since, whenever I cook something that has bony pointy ends that can puncture the bag I double vacuum bag them. Right now I have some beef short ribs going that will be finished at 5:00 today and they are double bagged.

 

The ChefSteps "oil up" method, kindly linked by Anna in post 429, should take care of this.

 

Last night I used this method for bagging pork chops with good results.

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The ChefSteps "oil up" method, kindly linked by Anna in post 429, should take care of this.

 

Last night I used this method for bagging pork chops with good results.

Are you saying that if I add oil or butter or some sort of fat that will take care of the sharp edges? I went back to Anna's post # 411 (429 is not hers) and scrolled through the linked piece and while it talked about adding fat nowhere did it say anything about it having an effect on sharp points. I must be missing something and if you could clarify what that is, I'd appreciate it.

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Are you saying that if I add oil or butter or some sort of fat that will take care of the sharp edges? I went back to Anna's post # 411 (429 is not hers) and scrolled through the linked piece and while it talked about adding fat nowhere did it say anything about it having an effect on sharp points. I must be missing something and if you could clarify what that is, I'd appreciate it.

 

Odd, in my browser post #429 is Anna's:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/150101-what-are-you-cooking-sous-vide-today/?p=2018647

 

With the oil in the bag any sharp points do not press into the plastic.

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Potatoes again! This time for my carb-loving granddaughter. No duck fat left! Ouch. So I used butter in the bag and will likely crisp them up in some olive oil. I had a hard time finding out how much in advance I could cook the potatoes but it seems 48 hours is the answer. Cook, chill for an hour and store for up to 48 hours.

Don't know what is happening with the post numbers as the post Jo is referring to is #411 on my system.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Yes, post # 429 is from Chris_s. I still don't see the reference to the fact that oil in the bag will cause sharp points to not press into the plastic. Must be there somewhere if you can see it but I can't find it.

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After reading the chefstep oil up tips, I am thinking of freezing some olive oil before putting in the vacuum bag.

I think by putting frozen oil, it should be easier to seal it.

Do you think this is a good idea?

Except for the additional timing to wait to defrost the oil before putting in the sous vide.

I am using Foodsaver, which I always have difficulty with liquid inside the bag.

Edited by Josh71 (log)
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Josh,

I was regretting today that I did not have some frozen olive oil in ice cube trays to put into my sous vide bag. But not sure why you would think there was a reason to wait for it to thaw before putting it into the bath. Timing is just not that critical with sous vide. Bet it is liquid within minutes of sealing the bag.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Yes, post # 429 is from Chris_s. I still don't see the reference to the fact that oil in the bag will cause sharp points to not press into the plastic. Must be there somewhere if you can see it but I can't find it.

 

My post #411 is from Okanagancook.

 

The ChefSteps article does not say oil will prevent sharp points from pressing into the plastic, but think about it.  The oil relieves the pressure of the bag against the bone.

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Potatoes again! This time for my carb-loving granddaughter. No duck fat left! Ouch. So I used butter in the bag and will likely crisp them up in some olive oil. I had a hard time finding out how much in advance I could cook the potatoes but it seems 48 hours is the answer. Cook, chill for an hour and store for up to 48 hours.

Don't know what is happening with the post numbers as the post Jo is referring to is #411 on my system.

 

From a safety perspective, if you chill to 5ºC in less than 1:5 hours and store in a fridge under 5ºC, you can store the cooked & chilled potatoes for much longer, at least 7 days and likely longer. With the time&temp you need for potatoes they are almost sterilized. Flavour-wise, they will lose almost no quality during that period.

 

On the other hand, some vegetables have been found to keep the most nutrients (with respect to other methods) like some vitamins when cooked sous-vide and consumed inmediatelly, but not so much when chilled and stored, in that case the vitamins retention is more or less equivalent to having beeing cooked by traditional boiling.

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