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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 1)


paulraphael
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Rotuts, that sounds interesting. Let me see if I correctly understand your process. You flatten the breast, slather with Dijon, wrap completely? in bacon, then SV? Wouldn't the bacon come out flabby or am I missing something here? Bacon = yuminess, flabby bacon not so much.

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I have not mentioned what is most important :

 

there are two 'breast' muscles   the Major  ( thats the bigger ) and then the Minor ( thats the smaller )

 

most times the sell the smaller as the " tender "    :blink:

 

they taste the same.    

 

the smaller has a tendon that's a bit tubular  you need to tease this out

 

the larger muscles does indeed have a tendon

 

but you need to scrape it off on the Up Side

 

then with a small thin knife  go into whats left, and slide that down to get ride of the reast

 

then you remove everything else that's left towards thew insertion of that major musle

 

that way  there are no tendons nor facia that leave your

 

CkBr a bit crunchy

 

worth the time

 

after a bit  you can do this for each CkBr in about 30 sec

 

makes a big difference

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what I do id after the tendons are removed :

 

I gently cut the CkBr to get a bit of opening

 

then I open that up for a bit of mild flattening with the TJ's bottles

 

:huh:

 

then I add the items in  question

 

then tie  so they stay firm for the SV

 

Ive done this a long time ago with both CkBr and Turkey Br  with my favorite:

 

hard salami   mortadella   and swiss cheese  

 

delicious  it all is

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no.  it becomes part of the sandwich.

 

the mustard and bacon make this sandwich great

 

it would then depend on the mustard and bacon you use.

 

the bacon is cooked just not crispy    as the slices are thin, it all works out fine

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I did up 2 of these ham hocks today. Or rather, I finished cooking them today. They were brined for 72 hours, cooked sous vide for 48 hours, glazed and roasted at 450 for 20 minutes. This one is for tonight's dinner, the other is in the freezer.

image.jpg

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Ohh, those ham hocks look luscious!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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ElsieD, I have to try those ham hocks. Last night we had a brisket that I corned for 7 days and cooked sous vide at 180ºF for 10 hours. After cooking, I refrigerated it overnight. Before serving, I sliced it and put it in a baking dish, added some juices from the bag and some water, covered it with foil and warmed it up. Best I ever ate.

 

 

11080757_10153800909278569_3487191832831577259_o.jpg

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Short ribs. 70 hours at 144.

Quick sear before being bagged in the cooking liquid.

I made a slurry or onion carrot and celery, puréed in the blender and then cooked down with some red wine.

Salt, espellette, touch of cumin.

Quick sear again when it came out of the bag and I reduced the cooking liquid further, strained it, and mounted with butter.

Gingered carrots done with butter and ginger in a vacuum bag, 3 mins in the microwave (a Michael Voltaggio's trick)

Awfully good, if one does say so one's self!

image.jpg

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it's all just by eye really.

I chopped up about a 2" 'knob' of ginger, and added about 3 tablespoons of butter to the bag.

About 8 medium carrots, peeled. (I like to do it with rainbow carrots for the look)

 

seal and microwave for about 3 minutes.

It usually actually bursts the bag open near the end, but that's fine.

You get a nice even steaming and with the flavour of the ginger infused into the butter.

 

 

it's a pretty good, and fast, trick

Edited by weedy (log)
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Short ribs. 70 hours at 144.

Quick sear before being bagged in the cooking liquid.

I made a slurry or onion carrot and celery, puréed in the blender and then cooked down with some red wine.

Salt, espellette, touch of cumin.

Quick sear again when it came out of the bag and I reduced the cooking liquid further, strained it, and mounted with butter.

Gingered carrots done with butter and ginger in a vacuum bag, 3 mins in the microwave (a Michael Voltaggio's trick)

Awfully good, if one does say so one's self!

 

That temperature is higher than I do my short ribs, but those carrots sure do look lovely!

 

I credit lesliec for my short ribs temperature.  I guess it is time to buy some more.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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it's all just by eye really.

I chopped up about a 2" 'knob' of ginger, and added about 3 tablespoons of butter to the bag.

About 8 medium carrots, peeled. (I like to do it with rainbow carrots for the look)

seal and microwave for about 3 minutes.

It usually actually bursts the bag open near the end, but that's fine.

You get a nice even steaming and with the flavour of the ginger infused into the butter.

it's a pretty good, and fast, trick

Fascinating. I had to research it a little further and found Michael's video on YouTube. I am hoping this link will work for others to enjoy it too:

Well apparently my link did not work so I have removed it. But it is not difficult to search for Michael Voltaggio on YouTube and find the one titled "What is Sous Vide".

Edited to remove nonworking link and add text instead.

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I just took two small lamb chops out of the sous vide, chilled them down and stuck them in the fridge for later.

I was so excited about the microwave carrots and other vegetables that I had to give it a try. Very disappointing. Followed the instructions to a T but the carrots were barely past raw. In no way did they reach my criterion of cooked. I like vegetables to retain a little crispness but these carrots were still close to rockhard. They definitely appeared to be about the same size and shape as those in the video. My microwave is 1200 W. After attempting the carrots I cut up an onion into slices about 1/8 inch thick put them in a bag with some butter and tried those. Still not cooked enough to my liking. There does not seem to be much room for experimenting in a technique that appears to be so simple. Input would be welcome.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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And here I was, all excited about this new way to cook carrots, a vegetable I love.

I really think you should try it before you dismiss it. It is not an expensive experiment. After all how much can carrots cost? And it's certainly not time-consuming. It obviously works for some people. There could be many reasons why it didn't work for me. I would hate to discourage others from attempting this. Perhaps my carrots were old and their's were younger and tender. Please give it a shot.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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That temperature is higher than I do my short ribs, but those carrots sure do look lovely!

 

I credit lesliec for my short ribs temperature.  I guess it is time to buy some more.

 

I"ve done them in the past at 134 F as well. But I wanted to try to get closer to a 'braised' feeling.

this was a kind of compromiise temp that seed to work well for me.

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  I added a healthy amount of TJ's dijon and a rasher of

 

Benton's bacon, which my sister sent me for Xmas    about a lifetime worth I thought then

 

I tied them up so that they would hold their shape and added them w the others to the water bath, same time and temp.

 

these are on the R in the pic.

 

these sliced thin for a sandwich were Delicious.  Still tender, moist, but packed w flavor.  Lettuce, tomato, mayo homemade machine bread

 

looks like the Benton's might just hold me until next Xmas, or Ill have to re-order !

 

a real revelation !   :biggrin:

 

Thanks, rotuts.  I will have to try this!

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I did some baby back ribs last night @170F for 5 hours.  They were brushed with a BBQ sauce and broiled until starting to caramelize.  I served it with celery root and sweet potato @185 for 90 minutes, puréed with butter, cream, roasted garlic and horseradish.  It was all very tasty.  The meat pulled cleanly off the bone but still had good texture. The purée was silky smooth, but the pale orange colour reminded me a bit of baby food.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I had baby back ribs tonight, cooked 36 hours at 141.5. took them out, brushed with sweet baby ray's bbq sauce, grilled for 5 minutes on each side on hot grillgrates. 

 

This is hands down the BEST sv experience I've had so far. And by that I mean the biggest improvement from traditional cooking. The texture was amazing, soft as butter to bite threw but not sloppy falling apart. The meat had a pleasant pink inside. Very good flavor. 

 

I've done boiled, I've done low temperature wrapped in foil. This beats all. And very easy to prep after work! 

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Last night:

 

Duck breast, skin removed, at 135F for 1.5 hrs.

Out of the circulator, cut the duck into 1" cubes, then into a quick pan fry to crisp the outside a touch.

 

meanwhile, I had crisped up the skin and then cut it into thin strips - like duck bacon bits.

 

Tomatillo-Chipotle Salsa

Habanero pickled Red Onions

Sliced Avocado

 

served on warm corn tortillas (I didn't make these this time; call me lazy!)

 

 

my faux Duck "Carnitas"

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