• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

paulraphael

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 1)

567 posts in this topic

I'm leading a more domesticated life this year. Cooking has shifted from experiments in art / science / decadence to a means of feeding people. I'm still trying to figure it out!

The possibly cruel irony is that this coincides with the new availability of cheap immersion circulators. I've had to borrow circulators for special occasions in the past.

How many of you find sous-vide cooking useful for your daily meals?

And how many of you like sous-vide for cooking things besides meat? I've always used it for fantastic pieces of meat, but this isn't what I'm cooking every day.

If you have sources on techniques / approaches for sous-viding things like green vegetables, root vegetables, and god knows what else, I'd love to check them out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive found the SV is extremely useful for everyday meals.  as you mentioned, meats.

 

you get them on sale, you batch them out, you rapid chill and freeze .  you then work from that stock for your everyday meals

 

I use a small beer cooler for the reheat.  your time in the kitchen can be used to concentrate on other things: the salad, the veg etc.

 

Ive done very little SV veg, as I get interested in that at the wrong time of the season.

 

SV will give you perfect Asparagus, and green beens every time which you can also freeze and reheat.

 

Asp. and GB's for me are the most difficult veg to cook just right, a bit too much time and they are ruined.  the same goes for too little time.

 

Really fresh 'garden carrots' also shine, the kind you find in a farmers market w nice fresh tops.

 

alas i cant sent you to a fine SV veg ref.

 

hopefully others will.


Edited by rotuts (log)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I regularly make the vegetable stock from Modernist Cuisine, it's the best I've ever tasted, by far. I've tried it using the same ingredients but cooked conventionally, and the sous vide version is much superior, particularly in aroma. It's also pretty quick to make and can be batched and frozen.

1 person likes this

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use SV on a weekly basis for making salmon - with no effort, I get the salmon exactly how I like it (just at the point of flaking - about 100degF) every time.  While it cooks unattended (I use a gradient with bath set to 115 and use the sous vide app Sous Vide Dash, then torch the top), I can spend the rest of the time working on the sides, veg and sauce so everything is done at the same time, and I can have dinner on the table during the week in about 20-25 minutes.

 

As rotuts mentioned, SV is great for asparagus.  What's great is the flexibility - different combinations yield a completely different product.  My wife loves the green, vegetal asparagus flavor, so I find that cooking it around 150degF for about 10 min. yields a barely cooked asparagus that is tender yet crisp, and retains the those flavors my wife is crazy for.  Some people like it more cooked, so I've read that 185 for 8-10 min. works well.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  


 

Ill be stealing borrowing that time and temp setting, next time Asp. goes on sale

 

Ive always had high hopes for SV several batches of Asp. at their peak then freezing and reheating in the winter as a treat

 

have you frozen SV Asp.?

 

BTW do you peel the Asp?  I do for the large ones as they seem to have more Asp. flavor than the little whips.


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, sous vide is an integrated part of how I now cook. From pork belly and beef cheeks to rhubarb or eggs, my sous vide supreme gets regular exercise. Buy when good, cheap and plentiful then bag, cook and freeze for quick meals works well.

The asparagus times sound worthy of further investigation.

Simon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot all about the SV eggs:  takes me 30 sec to have a SV egg any morning I want.

 

i SV at least a doz or 2 at a time, just the way I like them, rapid chill, dry, place back in the egg container and refrig.

 

ready and waiting. no plastic trees lost either.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  

 

Ill be stealing borrowing that time and temp setting, next time Asp. goes on sale

 

Ive always had high hopes for SV several batches of Asp. at their peak then freezing and reheating in the winter as a treat

 

have you frozen SV Asp.?

 

BTW do you peel the Asp?  I do for the large ones as they seem to have more Asp. flavor than the little whips.

I've never frozen asp. - I'd imagine it would turn to mush upon defrosting.  I have cooked/chilled though, and kept in the frigerator for a few days.  That worked out fine.  I also prefer the large asp. - and yes, I'll snap off the bottoms, then peel because I find the outer green part to be tough and fibrous.  Just had a thought - in the past, I had cooked the peeled asp in the bag with a bit of butter or oo... but I wonder if you could put a bit of liquid in the bag, as well as the peel (similar to the procedure when prepping MC potatoes for puree).  I wonder if you'd get even more asp. flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

How many of you find sous-vide cooking useful for your daily meals?

 

 

I don't.  Too expensive for the large apparatus and it demands more planning than I am up for.

 

However  I like the idea of preparing some soft foods sv, such as salmon. I may try with a canning jar and my counter top oven, as in this description   http://modernistcuisine.com/2013/01/why-cook-sous-vide/

 

Those of us who are closeted non sv'rs  can still use Dutch ovens, braziers, tagines, pc's, and bamboo steamers to cope with collagen, fibres and sinew.


Edited by jayt90 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do.

Though I don't use it daily.

Mostly for meats eg pork shoulder, corned beef, smoked turkey

I still like braises for short rib because you get the veg and the jus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SV might be a problem for some.  It can bring out the Inner Pack-Rat.

 

some time back I posted a pic of my basement stand-up freezer innards.  

 

I had a delicious turkey sandwich last night w some soup.  Feb SV.  2013.

 

it was delicious.  I usually get 4 - 5 thankgiving turkeys and deconstruct them for turkey dinners, sandwiches, cooked meat add-ins.

 

$ 0.49 cents / lbs

 

Last year I didnt.  I had enough from previous batch SV.

 

:huh:

 

hoping to get 6 - 10 CB's in there for the summer and now.

 

then Ill take a sabbatical .

 

The Siren Sings ...  " $ 1.77 lbs - Skinless Boneless Chicken Breasts"  these I stuff.

 

Ill be all chained up !


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's why it's good to have a freezer inventory spreadsheet or database... I don't have nearly the freezer space you have, but without my spreadsheet, I'd be constantly buying things not realizing I already had it ready to go.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am almost too inebriated to report, but must get the word out, God help me. I have never had better meat than marinated, vacuum sealed sous vide pork browned in sage and butter. I am very thankful.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to hear, Jo. The Mai Tai must surely have helped!

Now you should look out for a nice lamb rack. Couple of hours around 58°C then blasted in hot oil. Fantastically pink, juicy and ... fantastic.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use sous vide daily just as I don't grill daily or fry daily or... 

 

If you are going to decide to use a process on daily use, check out the toaster sub-thread.

 

Use what works for what you want that day. Sous vide is something that is part of the cooking pantheon, not something you would worship on a regular basis.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This week I had..a boneless pork butt. We were going to eat it at 5 pm Sunday, and it hadn't thawed out completely. So I removed it from the cryovac..seasoned with flake salt and a garlic pepper season...into my sous vide bag..into A. 190 f water bath for 5.5 hr. Wow...it turned out awesome.

Was so easy


Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use sous vide daily just as I don't grill daily or fry daily or... 

Ha. I don't even cook daily. I mean "everyday" in the sense of routine, ordinary, quotidian ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to hear, Jo. The Mai Tai must surely have helped!

Now you should look out for a nice lamb rack. Couple of hours around 58°C then blasted in hot oil. Fantastically pink, juicy and ... fantastic.

 

I'm still working on the lovely leftovers of lamb with medjul dates that was my very first sous vide experiment from this past weekend, before I got the vacuum sealer.  Significant problems are that I am buying more food than I can store and cooking more food than I can eat.

 

Not sure how much the mai tai helped.  The meat was wonderful as was the pressure cooked potato, but I burned the lima beans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"""   Significant problems are that I am buying more food than I can store and cooking more food than I can eat.  """

 

its a form of addiction :  ive posted pics of my freezer downstairs a while ago.  good luck finding that pic.

 

had a delicious ( Feb ) turkey breast for a fine sandwich the other day.  Soooo good money couldn't buy it anywhere.

 

not making that up either. It was from 2013.  in perfect shape.  $ 0.49 cents an lbs  w 'bone loss' came to about 88 cents an lbs.

 

might still have some '12 maturing in there.  probably not.

 

you will know youve got the 'jones' going when you buy a freezer for the basement / rec. room/ garage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a small apartment, but, yes, last summer I was looking into a dedicated freezer for ice cream.

 

My question tonight is about leftovers sous vide.  I have half a pork chop from last night that has been cooked but not yet seared.  If I sear it from refrigerator temperature the inside will be cold.  Can I reseal the leftover chop and heat it up sous vide?

 

And how about mashed potatoes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

remember, that chop is no longer pasteurized.  treat it just like refrigerated food that has not gone bad.

 

for only one chop, Id sear each side from cold to you liking, and then put the pan in a very low oven to reward.

 

you can microwave the MP's  they might enjoy a little hot milk and butter after heated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a small apartment, but, yes, last summer I was looking into a dedicated freezer for ice cream.

 

My question tonight is about leftovers sous vide.  I have half a pork chop from last night that has been cooked but not yet seared.  If I sear it from refrigerator temperature the inside will be cold.  Can I reseal the leftover chop and heat it up sous vide?

 

And how about mashed potatoes?

You can seal practically anything in a bag and reheat in the water bath. I do it all the time. It's great when you have a dinner party - everything can be precooked, then 10-20 min. before each course, just drop the bags in a 120-130degF bath to reheat. Works great for mashed potatoes, sauces, etc. - especially for those of us with very limited stove-top space! Like rotuts said, just keep in mind that it's no longer pasteurized, so treat it like you would any normal non-SV food - no longer than a week in a cold refrigerator, etc...
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

remember, that chop is no longer pasteurized.  treat it just like refrigerated food that has not gone bad.

 

for only one chop, Id sear each side from cold to you liking, and then put the pan in a very low oven to reward.

 

you can microwave the MP's  they might enjoy a little hot milk and butter after heated

 

It's late, and I'm saving the pork chop for another day.  Meanwhile I have the leftover mashed potato in a low oven heating up for dinner.  A microwave is one of those fancy devices I do not have.

 

I think I'll reseal the pork chop and reheat sous vide when the time comes.

 

Any thoughts on doing meat and plants sous vide together for the same meal?  Could I, say, cook carrots at high heat, then lower the bath temperature and reheat my pork chop with the carrots still in the bath?  The obvious solution is to get two Anovas but I'm not to that point yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two Anovas doesn't sound like a bad plan ...

 

There are logistical problems around vegetables and meat in the same bath, but they're probably not insurmountable - especially since your pork is a reheat.

 

The juggling you'll have to do reflects the very different temperatures the two need - carrots around 85°C, reheating pork probably more like 56°C.  I think I'd give the carrots their full hour at the high temp then chill them to stop them cooking further while you (first) get the bath temp down and (second) warm up the pork.  Then drop the carrots back in for  maybe 15 minutes at the end.  That will probably cause the bath temp to drop a few degrees, but I don't think there are any safety issues there for already-cooked pig.

 

I'll add a disclaimer that I've never actually tried doing this.  Somebody else probably has and can firm up on the details.

 

In the meantime, my Anova has been working on some 72 hour short ribs.  I'll head home shortly and whip up some mashed spuds to accompany, with a splash of truffle oil.  Luxury!


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's late, and I'm saving the pork chop for another day.  Meanwhile I have the leftover mashed potato in a low oven heating up for dinner.  A microwave is one of those fancy devices I do not have.

 

I think I'll reseal the pork chop and reheat sous vide when the time comes.

 

Any thoughts on doing meat and plants sous vide together for the same meal?  Could I, say, cook carrots at high heat, then lower the bath temperature and reheat my pork chop with the carrots still in the bath?  The obvious solution is to get two Anovas but I'm not to that point yet.

It works well.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By bhsimon
      Recently cooked whole bone-in lamb shoulder sous vide for 8 hours @ 80°C. The results were like a typical braise. More interestingly, I weighed the different components after cooking for future reference. Here is the breakdown:
       
      Before cooking:
      2.1 kg lamb shoulder – whole, bone-in, untrimmed
       
      After cooking:
      621 g liquid
      435 g bones and fat
      1044 g meat
       
      Almost precisely half of the total weight was meat. Hopefully this will be helpful if you are trying to calculate portions.
       
      As an aside to this: we've been cooking our tough cuts (sous vide) whole, without any trimming at all, and removing fat and bones after cooking. It is so much easier and faster than trimming everything beforehand. The excess fat comes off in large pieces and connective tissue peels away cleanly. Lamb shanks, for instance, are tedious to trim before cooking but easily cleaned up after they come out of the bag. It's luxurious to have big, clean pieces of shank meat although some may prefer on-the-bone presentation. We have tried this with pork shoulder, too, and the unwanted fat is easily removed after cooking with lovely hunks of tender meat remaining for slicing, dicing or shredding.
    • By Franzisaurus_Rex
      FOOD BRETHREN!
      I need some advice. I have one last piece of pork belly confit in the fridge. I brined these bad boys for about 5 days (brine included pink curing salt), vacuum sealed the squares of pork belly with lard and sous vide them at 158 F for 16 hours. I cooked this on 11/10/16 and its been in my refrigerator since. 
      Here is the general recipe I followed, with some modifications based on my taste: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/...
      The last piece is still vacuum sealed and submerged (mostly) in lard. Any visible pork only has contact with the bag. 
      It's staring at me. And calling my name.
      I want to deep fry this sucker and have a little date night with the handsome devil I see in the mirror every morning, but the last thing I want is spoiled food. I can't find any conclusive information about how long pork confit lasts for. I've only seen references that duck confit or in general that the confit technique will last for months in the fridge. I have found no sources which directly addresses pork confit.
      Questions/Factors I'm Considering:
      - Does pork confit keep for as long as duck confit?
      - Does vacuum sealing have any effect on the length of preservation?
      - Does sous-vide cooking method affect the length of preservation?
      I know I am probably being a bit paranoid, but I thought I would do my due diligence before taking the plunge, so to speak. Any advice on these questions would be extremely helpful and appreciated!
      The Franzisaurus-Rex
      PS - you should totally make this if you are into sous vide, confit, food, or have any respect for the enjoyment of life. Flash-searing these things after cooking was OUT OF THIS WORLD.
    • By FrogPrincesse
      Host's note: this delicious topic is continued from What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2)
       
       
      Duck breast, 57C for 90 min, pre and post sous-vide sear.
       

       
       

       

       
       
      So the texture was not significantly different from what I get with my usual technique, which is grilling over charcoal. But it's more uniformly pink, and there are no slightly overdone spots. I am pleased with the results even though searing in the house means a ton of smoke and duck fat everywhere!   (I did it on the stove in a cast iron skillet, next time I will place the skillet in the oven)
    • By TdeV
      Is it possible to put a rub on a sous vide item?
       
      I'm cooking pig wings here and I'm trying to figure how to finish them. This looks good but would require a rub.
    • By eG Forums Host
      Introduction

      Welcome to the index for the Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques, & Equipment topic, one of the largest and most influential topics on eG Forums. (The topic has been closed to keep the index stable and reliable; you can find another general SV discussion topic here.) This index is intended to help you navigate the thousands of posts and discussions to make this rich resource more useful and accessible.

      In order to understand sous vide cooking, it's best to clear up some misconceptions and explain some basics. Sous vide cooking involves vacuum-sealing food in a plastic bag and cooking it in a water bath at precise temperatures. Though it translates literally as "under vacuum," "Sous vide" is often taken to mean "under pressure," which is a misnomer; not all SV cooking involves food cooked in conditions that exceed atmospheric pressure. (See below.) In addition, calculations for SV cooking involve not only time and temperature but also thickness. Finally, due to the anaerobic conditions inside the bag and the low temperatures used, food safety issues are paramount.

      You can read the basics of SV cooking and equipment here. In the summer of 2005, Nathan Myhrvold (Society member nathanm) posted this informative, "I'm now going to answer my own initial questions" post, which addresses just about everything up to that point. For what came next, read on -- and be sure to order Nathan Myhrvold's highly anticipated Modernist Cuisine book, due in spring 2011.

      As with all indexes of on-going discussions, this one has limitations. We've done our best to create a user-friendly taxonomy emphasizing the categories that have come up repeatedly. In addition, the science, technology, and recipes changed over time, and opinions varied greatly, so be sure to read updated information whenever possible.

      Therefore, we strongly encourage you to keep these issues in mind when reading the topic, and particularly when considering controversial topics related to food safety, doneness, delta T cooking, and so on. Don't read a first post's definitive claim without reading down the topic, where you'll likely find discussion, if not heated debate or refutation, of that claim. Links go to the first post in a series that may be discontinuous, so be sure to scan a bit more to get the full discussion.

      Recipes were chosen based solely on having a clear set of information, not on merit. Indeed, we've included several stated failures for reference. Where possible, recipes include temperature and time in the link label -- but remember that thickness is also a crucial variable in many SV preparations. (See below for more information on thickness.)

      History, Philosophy & Value of SV/LTLT Cooking

      Over the years, we've talked quite a bit about SV as a concept, starting with this discussion about how SV cooking got started. There have also been several people who asked, Why bother with SV in the first place? (See also this discussion.) What with all the electronics and plastic bags, we asked: Does SV food lack passion? Finally, there have been several discussions about the value of SV cooking in other eG Forums topics, such as the future of SV cooking, No More Sous Vide -- PLEASE!, is SV "real cooking," and what's the appeal of SV?

      Those who embrace SV initially seek ideas about the best applications for their new equipment. Discussions have focused on what a first SV meal should be -- see also this discussion -- and on the items for which SV/LTLT cooking is best suited. There's much more along those lines here, here, and here.

      Vacuums and Pressure in Sous Vide Cooking

      As mentioned above, there has been great confusion about vacuums, pressure, and their role SV cooking. Here is a selection of discussion points on the subject, arranged chronologically; please note that later posts in a given discussion may refute earlier ones:

      Do you need a vacuum for SV cooking, and, if so, why? What exactly is a "vacuum"? Click here, here, and ff. Are items in vacuum-sealed bags "under pressure"? Does a vacuum sealer create a vacuum inside the bag? Do you really need a vacuum, or can you use ZipLoc bags? Also see here, here, and here. If "sous vide" means "under pressure," aren't the items in the bag under pressure? There is more along these lines to be found in this discussion.  

      The Charts

      We've collected the most important of many charts in the SV topic here. Standing above the rest are Nathan Myhrvold's charts for cooking time versus thickness and desired core temperature. We worked with him to create these three reformatted protein tables, for beef, fish, and chicken & pork.

      Nathan provides additional information on his charts here. Information on how to read these charts can be found in this post. For an explanation of "rest time" in Nathan's tables, click here.

      Other Society members helped out as well. Douglas Baldwin references his heating time table for different geometric factors (slab/cylinder/sphere) here; the pdf itself can be found here. pounce created a post with all three tables as neatly formatted images. derekslager created two monospace font charts of Nathan's meat table and his fish table.

      Camano Chef created a cumulative chart with information gathered from other sources including Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc. Douglas Baldwin shared this chart devoted to pasteurizing poultry. PedroG detailed heat loss and steady state energy consumption of sous vide cookers in these charts.

      Finally, there is also an eG Forums topic on cooling rates that may be of interest.

      Acknowledgment & Comments

      This index was built by Chris Amirault, Director, eG Forums. It was reviewed by the eGullet Society volunteer team as well as many Society members. Please send questions or comments to Chris via messenger or email.
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.