• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Plantes Vertes

Uses of herbs in cooking

35 posts in this topic

I checked my pantry and also have a huge bag of herbes de Provence that I brought from France... I can't believe I forgot. I could not survive without them. I use them on grilled foods mostly, but other stuff too - I just added some to the lentils I am cooking now. The mix I have contains rosemary, thyme, basil, and marjoram. I've seen mixes in the US that include lavender but that just seems odd to me.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another vote for summery savory - an incredibly versatile and delicious herb, definitely not just for beans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, it's not an herb strictly but I'd like to include capers,they are very dear to me, they remind my of " home". Not those terrible capers from supermarkets, the real ones, if you ever had a chance of trying.

I use them in tomato salad, in the stuffing for vegetables and mixed roasted summer vegetables, with fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By real ones Franci do you mean the ones packed in salt? Or particular brands? Curious for recommendations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My grandfather had plants of capers in the garden and use to pick them and cure them with salt but his capers didn't looked dusted with salt, just wet. Now my cousin make capers for everybody in the family, I must ask her how she cures them. The few times I ran out and bought from stores capers under salt I was always amazed at the difference in taste. Last time at Eataly I was temped from the pantelleria capers but then I didn't want to be disappointed and 15$ lighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plantes:

 

My main "go-to" herb is Italian parsley.  I go through 1-2 bunches a week.  Now that I've started making charmoula on a weekly basis, I'll probably increase it.

 

Other candidates include:

 

chives -- as a garnish, in omelettes, pesto

mint -- in desserts, in soda, for infused syrups, in ice cream or sorbet, with Thai food, lamb, in salads, in tisanes, tea

thyme -- with lamb, in tisanes, in stews, soups, infused in port

oregano -- with tomatoes, tomato sauces, vegetables, Greek salad, pizza

basil -- mostly in Italian cooking:  insalata caprese, pesto, stufato di verdure, etc.

rosemary -- with lamb; in Italian cooking:  pollo alla cacciatore, etc.; in infused syrups, roasted vegetables

sage -- with brown butter, in soups and stews; fried in olive oil till crisp, then crumbled over pasta, vegetables or used as a garnish in salads

cilantro -- in charmoula, in Indian and Mexican cooking

 

Some things that I occasionally come across are:  sorrel, marjoram and tarragon.

 

Not all of these are available year-round (I buy primarily from farmers markets).

 

One thing I like to do as the year progresses is an herb salad.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Soba, and very glad to see you again! I hadn't heard of chermoula before; what do you put in yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Soba, and very glad to see you again! I hadn't heard of chermoula before; what do you put in yours?

 

It's a spicy herb sauce common in Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.

 

My version usually contains hefty doses of Italian parsley, cilantro and scallions.  Sometimes I'll add mint.  I also like toasted and ground coriander seeds, cumin seeds, garlic, chipotle peppers and/or preserved citrus, occasionally saffron. The sauce base also contains sea salt, black pepper, Meyer lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really recommend growing a few, even if it has to be on the windowsill. That way, you can nibble and get to know the basic nature of each herb better.


Of course, many herbs combine different aromas and tastes, but the more you notice about their characteristics, the freer you will be to experiment or substitute. Tart, sour, peppery, heady and citrusy, resiny piney, warm and aromatic, funky, bitter...
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a spicy herb sauce common in Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco.

 

My version usually contains hefty doses of Italian parsley, cilantro and scallions.  Sometimes I'll add mint.  I also like toasted and ground coriander seeds, cumin seeds, garlic, chipotle peppers and/or preserved citrus, occasionally saffron. The sauce base also contains sea salt, black pepper, Meyer lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil.

I'm making a batch tonight and taking pix for here and eventually, the blog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.