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Okanagancook

What Wine Are You Drinking Today?

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I ordered it from a place in Chicago for $22 - the shipping was more than the cost of the wine! Not worth taking back. I had a feeling when I saw the low level in the bottle, though with old wines sometimes that's not a problem. In this case, the cork was totally damp throughout, and the wine was just a ghost of what it had been.

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Thought I'd bump this thread up again.

 

I didn't drink all these wines today. :biggrin:  Actually, these are some wines I've opened since my last post and I think they're worth a comment or two. As I was going through my notes, I realized I've chosen some little sisters, the smaller, less-known siblings of some famous wines that still show the winemaker's skill and concern for quality. Here they are:

 

2012 Brovia Roero Arneis, from the Piemonte region of Italy. The Piemonte is becoming one of my favorite wine-growing regions (barolo, barbera, dolcetto, gavi). This producer is famous for its barolo, but its arneis has been criticized for being too lean. The big fruit of the 2012 season has rounded out those sizzling acids, though, and this vintage is both full and lively. A pronounced flavor of pears, for which arneis is known. Decent aroma, but nothing to write home about--a surprise, considering how good this wine is. Nice long minerally finish. A very fine expression of arneis, about $25.

 

A white burgundy, 2010 Grand Vins of Bourgogne Bourgogne, a great value wine in the year of its release. I bought a bunch of bottles and stored them in my wine "cellar" (aka the back of a walk-in closet). This wine is meant to be drunk young, and the other bottles were drunk up. I forgot about this one until I did some housecleaning recently. It still drinks well, but the fruit has noticeably declined. Still, the fine structure and balance of this wine is a reminder of how well the wine was made. I haven't tried the 2011 vintage--it didn't cross my radar. This wine is made by Paul Pernot et fils, a venerable winery sitting on some of the classiest real estate in Puligny Montrachet. Some declassified Puligny Montrachet grapes were added to this wine, which is one reason it was so good.

 

2011 Jean-Louis Chave Selection Cotes du Rhone Rouge  "Mon Coeur." A red cotes de rhone from the Northern Rhone, grenache and syrah, by a winemaker that's famous for its Hermitage. Beautiful inky, garnet color to this wine, mouthfilling fruit with dark overtones, rounded tannins and good balance. Decent finish, nothing special. A little more alcohol heat than I would prefer, but it's not unpleasant. Full, ripe fruit aroma once it opens up in the glass, and that can take awhile. Definitely a value wine, IMO, about $20.

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Zind-Humbrecht grand cru, Clos Saint Urbain (Rangen de Thann), Gewürstraminer 2008. Forward, citrus and floral, with a slightly bittersweet tang on the end, only a hint of the kerosene one usually gets with gewürztraminer. Really lovely wine, the first I've had from this vineyard.


Edited by patrickamory (log)

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Jaboulet Parallele 45 - Cotes du Rhone - 2009. Blend is 60% Grenache and 40% Syrah from vines averaging 25 years old. Excellent - smooth and complex, and very reasonably priced.

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Last night, it was the 2012 Holdredge Russian River Valley Pinot Noir.

 

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This is the second bottle I've opened from a mixed case of John's pinots that we picked up on our swing through Sonoma last month. The first, a bottle of 'The True' Sonoma Coast, was spectacular. I served it to my winemaker father-in-law who just kept saying, "So well made..." after every sip. The flavors on this one were quintessential RRV, but I probably won't open another for a couple more years, it has the structure & tannin to age well beyond the expectations set by its $35 price tag, and I look forward to seeing it evolve.

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2008 Zinck Riesling, which has come to us from the unnervingly charming village of Eguisheim in Alsace, France. Run a Google image search if you doubt me. In person, it's so quaint it hurts.

 

I'm told '08 was an exceptional year for Alsatian Rieslings, and this one did not disappoint. The acidity was intense, which may be one of the reasons this is still drinking so well past the maker's recommended maximum of 5 years in the cellar. The diesel/petrol nose that I find to be a hallmark of bone dry Rieslings of the area was quite prominent. This may be off-putting to some, but I loved filling the gas tank as a kid, before vapor recovery. There was plenty of lemon and lime zestiness on the palate. Very glad I have a few more bottles, and won't be in too terrible of a rush to drink them.

 

20140529_170013.jpg


Edited by KD1191 (log)

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Did you have it on its own, or with food? I'm wondering what would pair well with a diesel/petrol vapour  :biggrin:. I enjoy Riesling, but Alsatian Riesling is usually priced out of my budget. 

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I enjoyed a couple glasses on its own, and then finished the bottle with an exceptionally spicy dry chicken curry. The diesel doesn't carry over to the flavor, thankfully, and either I become somewhat desensitized to it as I go along, or it lessens as the wine warms a bit.

 

I was shocked to find this on the shelf at $13 a bottle...bought the store out of their available stock.

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Contemplated a mini-vertical or horizontal tasting of Littorai Chardonnays...recently acquired the 2000 & 2001 Charles Heintz as well as the 2004 Thieriot & Mays Canyon. Went with the vertical, as I think the '04s can probably hold on a bit longer, while the others aren't going to get any better.

 

The 2000 is a rich golden color. Aroma of toffee, passion fruit, honeydew melon. Medium fruit, medium-plus acidity. After 14 years the oak is basically fully integrated, and I can feel very little tannin. It's full bodied, with citrus on the entry, mostly lime zest, evolving into butterscotch/crème brûlée. A faint hint of toasted oak, and some salinity on the long finish.

 

The 2001 is slightly lighter gold, yellow around the edges. There is more of the ocean in the nose, along with cantaloupe, apple. Medium fruit, medium acidity. The oak is a bit more prevalent, but still quite restrained. Also full bodied, but not quite as rich. There is more minerality on the palate, as well as flavors of sweet decay, truffle, and a greater salinity, maybe even a touch of olive.

 

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A 2004 Wyncroft Chardonnay, from Michigan (Lake Michigan Shore appellation, in the very southwest part of the state), accompanying chicken w/morels :wub:  and stir-fried Shanghai choi tips (with a bit of use-me-now Chinese cabbage).

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Over the last few days I've been to some London Wine Week events. I tasted a new grape, the Greek Malagousia, which has been resurrected from near extinction over the last 30-40 years. The wine was the Kitma Gerovassiliou 2013 from an Epanomi vineyard; I enjoyed it. It's reminiscent of a Chardonnay in terms of concentration of fruit, with apple as the dominant element and some notes of elderflower and even dried exotic fruit or candied peel, without excessive sweetness. A refreshing golden wine with medium acid and an orchard aroma. 

 

I also attended a tasting of the Rothschild International Portfolio single-grape wines (I could not find any reference to these online from the company itself so am not sure that such a thing exists outside the material marketing the event...). I think it's fair to say that Rothschild did not bring out the big vintages for this free tasting - we tried a French Viognier, a Chilean Sauvignon Blanc, an Argentinian Malbec, a Pinot Noir, a Merlot, and a Cabernet Sauvignon. They were from 2008-13 and few were especially distinctive for me.  What was remarkable, however, was that the organisers poured us each six full glasses of wine rather than six normal tasting measures! Perhaps they were aware that their wines were somewhat ordinary and hoped to make us all forget...

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The Greek wine sounds intriguing. With a lot of French wine in Shanghai suspect or at the very least, over-priced, I'm always interested in less famous wine producing regions.

 

Currently I'm on a Spanish kick. I opened a bottle of "Idola" Catalonian white last night. I have no other info about it, as the label is otherwise obscured by the Chinese label. It tastes chardonnay-ish to me, however, and is excellent on its own. I've also been getting a cava from Penedès, from Jané Ventura. At my price level, sparkling wines often tastes the same to me, but this is a real exception. It's quite dry, and has a distinct liquorice flavour, which I think makes it pair quite well with Chinese dishes.

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2012 Château Petit Roubié Picpoul de Pinet, a white wine that I ordered at a local restaurant, surprisingly good. An organic wine from the Languedoc, made from the picpoul grape (never heard of it before). Crisp, aromatic, medium-bodied, good fruit (apricots and peaches), good balance, a little minerality to keep you interested, and an easy match with food. What's not to like? About $15 retail.

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Bogle Vineyard Old Vine Zin 2009. Picked this up, um, a while ago. Not too many Cali Zins (or Zins in general, although the variety is becoming increasingly popular--albeit in an obscure kind of way--in Australia) available locally. The bloke at the guy said he opted to stock this Zin as his only Zin because he felt it was representative of the style. Or something. Either way, I reckon it's pretty good. A nice sidearm when thesis-writing.

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Uch, a 2009  Castello di Bibbione (Chianti Classico) which is outright horrible. An, if I recall correctly, I paid the equivalent of $18 for the bottle. 

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A try-out bottle of 2011 Ghost Block Oakville Estate Cabernet Sauvignon. Ghost Block is a Napa cab with a following, and now I know why. Sweet plummy aroma, abundant fruit with spice, an exotic fruit note in there, a bitter note too, even a hint of floral. Smooth tannins provide plenty of backbone. A well-balanced wine, with a long finish.

 

My wine vendor says this is a "good" year for Ghost Block, as opposed to a great year, although this wine is on a par with other vintages. That does make me wonder what "great" means, because this wine is superb. Not a vintage I would cellar, though, very drinkable and delicious now. The winery takes its name from its flagship vineyard, located near an old graveyard of Napa Vly pioneers.

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Opened a not-too-expensive 'dry red' at random to cook with. Left myself only just enough for a couple glasses. Shame, I'm enjoying it. 

 

Domaine Fond Croze Cuvee Romanaise. 2009/Rhone villages. 

 

Big blackberry. Fades into tannin ... but not too much. The Rhone villages and French wine in general are relatively new to me. Not that my wine palate is particularly flash. There's a subtle ... and I mean real subtle, to the point I wonder if I'm imaging in it, smoky savouriness to it. For a big wine it verges on what a beer drinker would deem 'easy drinking'. Shame about the bulk going into sugo, I guess ...

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2011 Château Pesquié Côtes du Ventoux 'Les Terrasses.' A red Rhone wine, 70% grenache and 30% syrah. Not your typical fruity Rhone wine. I had to sit with this one for a while before I decided I liked it. Lots of pepper and garrigue (think Herbes de Provence), menthol, a bit of meatiness, a whiff of roses. Rich fruit, but the pepper and herbs take over. Good balance, smooth tannins. The aroma was so funky when I opened it, I thought it was spoiled. Give this wine plenty of time to breathe before service. Eventually the aroma becomes sweet, fruity and herb-y. This wine would match well with Mediterranean-style food off the grill, especially lamb. Or bring it to a group tasting and let people talk about it.

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Doing a comparison tonight.  I've had vin juane before and enjoy it.  Was sampled a cheap amarone recently and fascinated at the similarity to vin juane, so I bought a nice one.  Anyone know - I can't re-cork the amarone can I?

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missed my photo upload.

Amarone.jpg

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Toi Toi Clutha Pinot Noir '11. The '12 seems divisive on the review front: glowing, glowing, glowing as oppose to downright hateful. Maybe the younger one is a different beast to this but I think it's okay. Fresh blackberry. Juicy. Soft tannin. Strong oak on the tail.

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Last night, with NY Strips au Poivre and sauteed mushrooms. Your typical pinot is not going to hold up to cracked peppercorn & Cognac sauce covered bone-in steaks, but this is not a typical pinot. It has wonderful grilled meat, black pepper (I locked onto Nepali Timur, specifically), Bergamot, balsa and even light cedar wood aromas...these meaty, woodsy flavors continue on the palate and are joined by overripe strawberry. A silky texture on the entry gave way to plenty of acidity to cut through the richness of the meal and a long, lingering finish with just enough tannin to know it will comfortably age for several years more.

 

Bs8QjM-IEAAu0xX.jpg

 

2010 Littorai The Pivot Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir


Edited by KD1191 (log)

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Last night, with NY Strips au Poivre and sauteed mushrooms. Your typical pinot is not going to hold up to cracked peppercorn & Cognac sauce covered bone-in steaks, but this is not a typical pinot. It has wonderful grilled meat, black pepper (I locked onto Nepali Timur, specifically), Bergamot, balsa and even light cedar wood aromas...these meaty, woodsy flavors continue on the palate and are joined by overripe strawberry. A silky texture on the entry gave way to plenty of acidity to cut through the richness of the meal and a long, lingering finish with just enough tannin to know it will comfortably age for several years more.

 

Bs8QjM-IEAAu0xX.jpg

 

2010 Littorai The Pivot Vineyard Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir

Littorai..I have had and is very good

 

If I'm not mistaken w/o looking I think that yr was what made them new winery of the yr  in SC

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stopped at Kacaba Winery today  on the way back from Niagara region  and had a barrel tasting.         Tasting right from the barrels brought back memories of my fathers wine barrels in his  fruit cellar. :) 

 

 2013 barrel fermented Chardonnay was quite nice, high praise from me since I pretty much despise  oaked Chardonnay.  I was too pleasantly surprised to really remember much specific info about it.  This is what the winemaker says about it on their website.   http://www.kacaba.com/product/barrel-fermented-chardonnay-2013/71

 

"The Kacaba 2013 Barrel Fermented Chardonnay was barrel fermented using exclusively new French oak, which gives it its rich golden color and great texture. Aromas of honeyed apple, nuts, lemon-lime, and oak spices complement the full flavored palate of silky, buttercream flavors with hints of toasted bread and oak. This 2013 Chardonnay is nicely balanced, full bodied, and ends with a clean, elegant finish. Enjoy this wine on its own or match with poultry, creamy dishes, salmon or lobster. " 

"

 

2013 Merlot was very nice  ,too light bodied  for my taste and a slightly noticeable alcohol bite . this may disappear when different barrels are blended before bottling according to the guide for the tasting tour. 

 

2013 Cabernet Franc      .. My favourite , blackberry jam on the nose,  medium bodied   fruit forward but clean finish. 

 

all three will be bottled in October. 

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