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ShaneH

"Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold, Young & Bilet (Part 3)

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Got home and my neighbours had intercepted the courier for me and had my copy. The packaging seems nuclear bomb proof and the set was smaller than I imagined it was going to be. But now happily installed on the "These do not go into the kitchen book shelf" :biggrin:

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Now for some reading, I may be sometime......

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What is the rough ETA for the printable full index (as noted up-thread), is it weeks or months (I hope for the former but fully understand if it is the latter).

Looking forward to getting my copy next Tuesday (Mar 10th US Amazon order for those that are keeping track)...

Check back - I believe it is now fully printable.

Thanks! You are correct; it is now printable. I am thinking of printing it and running it to my UPS store and have them bind it for me.

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Got home and my neighbours had intercepted the courier for me and had my copy. The packaging seems nuclear bomb proof and the set was smaller than I imagined it was going to be. But now happily installed on the "These do not go into the kitchen book shelf" :biggrin:

IMG_02701.JPG

Now for some reading, I may be sometime......

I have one of those too. But my cheap shelves are starting to sag under the weight. Time to invest in better shelving!

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Well, I can show you where I intend to keep mine, someday:

DSC_8779.jpg

Of course, the reality is, right now they live on my desk, more or less permanently:

DSC_8780.jpg

(volume one is on my wife's nightstand....)

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Mine (ours!) will make their permanent home with Kerry Beal but for the moment they litter my coffee table and the case and remaining volumes take up space on my dining room table - so lots of room to read and study - not so much room to eat. :laugh:

MC.jpg

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Mine (ours!) will make their permanent home with Kerry Beal but for the moment they litter my coffee table and the case and remaining volumes take up space on my dining room table - so lots of room to read and study - not so much room to eat. :laugh:

MC.jpg

Tell them how well your hubby is protecting them for me.

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Chef Myhrvold

Congrats on the successful launch of your epic tome. Have you considered publishing a version of your book that will appeal to the advanced home cook? I am sure there is more than enough in these five volumes to fill one book showing how modernist techniques can be applied in the average American home with readily available ingredients and commonly found tools.

Dan

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Mine (ours!) will make their permanent home with Kerry Beal but for the moment they litter my coffee table and the case and remaining volumes take up space on my dining room table - so lots of room to read and study - not so much room to eat. :laugh:

MC.jpg

Tell them how well your hubby is protecting them for me.

Yeah. I am not allowed to have food or drink within miles of them, can't rest my sheaf of paper on them when I write lest it bleed through, must remove them from the coffee table when we have visitors just in case those visitors are careless - sheesh even Kerry wouldn't be that strict with me. :raz:

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My friend who is in marketing just saw them, totally uninterested in the content but the printing, asking me questions I can't answer, I directed him to modernistcuisine.com but he wants to know more. I've never seen someone go so intense over a book - and that was just the prinbt quality. And for the kitchen manual I said it was made to be damage proof and he said can I rip it, heart said no, head said yes and it did not rip.

The book itself is a new thing. is there more info on the printing process and color accuracy I can pass on to my m8?

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Reading through chapter 2 tonight, I was surprised to read on pp. 1•132-133, regarding C. botulinum, that heating the food enough to kill the bacteria doesn't destroy the toxin they've already produced. My understanding of the specific case of botulism was that the toxin was quite easy to destroy; the CDC says that heating to an internal temperature of at least 85°C for at least 5 minutes will decontaminate the food in question. I realize there are lots of bacterial toxins that aren't inactivated by normal cooking temperatures, but can anyone clarify the issue of botulinum toxin? Or am I simply reading this paragraph wrong?

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85c for 5 minutes is quite high - I don't see an inconsistency here?

Yeah, I guess it's pretty dependent on the temperature at which C. botulinum begins to die. The reason it jumped out at me is because of the notorious difficulty in rendering the spores inactive, given that they can survive past 100°C.

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Anyone notice the distinctive smell of the books? I guess its the ink solvent...

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Anyone notice the distinctive smell of the books? I guess its the ink solvent...

Yes. It seems to dissipate as you use them or perhaps I am now so accustomed that I no longer notice it.

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it's like having a 'new car smell' - I miss the fragrance when it's gone. Maybe some bookshop sells a new book freshener to keep in the plastic sleeve!

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Mine, with pug:

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As soon as I got them, my husband said "Let's clear off the table and they can live there as long as you want them to." Heck if that's not a good use for a formal kitchen table, I don't know what it. 95% of the time we eat at our kitchen bar or in the living room.


Edited by abadoozy (log)

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Mine (ours!) will make their permanent home with Kerry Beal but for the moment they litter my coffee table and the case and remaining volumes take up space on my dining room table - so lots of room to read and study - not so much room to eat. :laugh:

MC.jpg

Litter your coffee table, the books in thier case are a coffee table :biggrin:

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Mine (ours!) will make their permanent home with Kerry Beal but for the moment they litter my coffee table and the case and remaining volumes take up space on my dining room table - so lots of room to read and study - not so much room to eat. :laugh:

MC.jpg

Litter your coffee table, the books in thier case are a coffee table :biggrin:

No kidding! I actually cleared off the top of a rolling file cabinet thinking that would be the perfect spot for them for a temporary home until I realized the cabinet's "home" is directly under the source of a major leak every time it rains. :wacko:

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Modernist Cuisine.jpg

So, I've only had them for about 3 days now, but I had to share my reaction so far even if it is a selection of random and maybe incoherent thoughts.

- Holy crap. I knew they were about 50lbs, but they are much heavier than I expected somehow.

- I usually flip through a new book, noting the pictures and interesting recipes, notes...before I go back and actually read in more details. I only managed to do this with Volume 3 and a quarter of volume 2 so far. This is so difficult to do with MC (in a VERY good way). There are so many things that give me pause to read or just look at.

- I love the layout. Instead of being text text text picture text text...you get all that plus the boxes, sidebars, thoughts, some humor, The Science of, The Chemistry of...It makes these books so much more easier to wade through. Almost like a walk in a park with lots of nice foliage. Otherwise it could get tedious and maybe boring.

- I love the What not To do with ____, especially the microwave one. But I still have a lot to go.

- Did anyone really find these difficult to READ?? I am postive I will be reading these cover to cover. Maybe not in order, but I will. The language is fluid and sharp. The paper feels great and the font size and shape seem perfect. Granted I have a lot to actually delve into in detail but I do not understand Ruhlman's comment about it boring him or giving him a headache.

- Girardet's fish cooking method is so damn neat.

- I need to find the sweet spot (or was it zone?) for my grill ASAP.

- After living on the formal dinner table for a couple of days, my dear wife moved them to the bar. They actually look good there and I have no actual bookshelf that they will fit in (too heavy). Dear wife promises she will make room in the kitchen for them...I'm skeptical...

- What "recipe" to try seems beside the point now, but possibly the macaroni and cheese

- Negative? honestly not really at this point, but one thing that confused me a bit is that volume 3 seems to start on the plants section and then delves into cooking methods and techniques abruplty (like batters and frying). I would've assumed this would be on volume 2, but then again V2 is so large that maybe it made more sense to not have it there. Like I said, my thoughts are not all together now and I could be worng about the specific order.

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The organization takes some getting used to -- as would, I think, the organization of anything this massive. After all, most content could reasonably be included in several sections; it's all one big Venn diagram. Thank goodness for the cross-indexing....

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So I have a delivery date scheduled for my copy on Tuesday (books are within 90 mi) – check

I have my Index printed off and ready for use – check

I have my book opening party scheduled with family and 1 year-old granddaughter (someone has to play with all that cook packaging) – check

Notebook and pens ready to go (Anna’s picture was an inspiration) – check

Study area close to kitchen to install the books for the foreseeable future – check

Ready to go to school…

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I have a question about the Kitchen Manual. My kitchen manual does not lie square. The first few pages, perhaps 10 or so, are out of kilter. Now, I am not a perfectionist, but having said that, I am just curious as to why this is happening on a ring binder? Is there a fix. Believe me when I say, this will not keep me up at nights. The Books, and I am only 50% through Volume One are just awesome. In my 70 years, I have never seen anything like them.

alanjesq

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So I have a delivery date scheduled for my copy on Tuesday (books are within 90 mi) – check

I have my Index printed off and ready for use – check

I have my book opening party scheduled with family and 1 year-old granddaughter (someone has to play with all that cook packaging) – check

Notebook and pens ready to go (Anna’s picture was an inspiration) – check

Study area close to kitchen to install the books for the foreseeable future – check

Ready to go to school…

Someone else who saw potential for the packaging other than the recycle bin. Mine is reserved for 10-year-old granddaughter for her next school project that requires some hefty construction material. :smile:

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      As far as minimum pan diameter goes, Panasonic claims the KY-MK3500 needs 5” diameter in ferromagnetic pans, and 6” in copper or aluminum ones. My own tests have shown that in fact the unit will function with a cast iron fondue pot, the base of which is only 4 1/8” in diameter, and also works with a copper saucepan, the base of which is almost exactly 5” in diameter. Obviously, the field will be most active at the very edges of such small pans, but they do function.
       
      V. Evaluation in Use

      I can say that not only does the Panasonic KY-MK3500 “work” with copper and aluminum pans, but that it works very well with them. Thermally, thick gauge conductive material pans perform in close emulation of the same pans on gas, even though there are no combustion gasses flowing up and around the pan. I found this startling.
       
      Nevertheless, a searching comparison between copper and ferromagnetic pans on this unit isn’t as straightforward as one might expect. The Panasonic is capable of dumping a full 3500 watts into ferromagnetic pans, but is limited to 2400 watts for aluminum and copper. Despite copper’s and aluminum’s superiorities in conductivity, that extra 1100 watts is going to win every speed-boil race.
       
      I initially thought I could handicap such a race simply by using the temperature setting and comparing the times required to achieve a “preheat” in a pans of cold water. Alas, no—the Panasonic’s IR function signified the copper pan was preheated to 350F before the water even reached 70F! Obviously, the entire thermal system of cold food in a cold pan needs to come to equilibrium before the Panasonic’s temperature readout becomes meaningful.

      A. Temperature Settings
       
      Unfortunately, with every pan I tried, the temperature settings were wildly inaccurate for measuring the temperature of the food. I heated 2 liters of peanut oil in a variety of pots, disk-base, enameled cast iron enameled steel, and copper. I thought it might be useful to see how close to 350F and 375F the settings were for deep frying. The oil in a Le Creuset 5.5Q Dutch oven set to 350F never made it past 285F, and it took 40:00 to get there. I kept bumping up the setting until I found that the setting for 420F will hold the oil at 346F. A disk-based pot didn’t hit 365F until the temperature setting was boosted to 400F. The only pan which came remotely close to being true to the settings was a 2mm silvered copper oven, which heated its oil to 327F when the Panasonic was set for 350F, and 380F when set for 410F.
       
      The temperature function was a lot closer to true when simply preheating an empty pan. With a setting of 350F, all the shiny stainless pans heated to just a few degrees higher (about 353-357F) and held there. This is useful for judging the Leidenfrost Point (which is the heat at which you can oil your SS and have it cook relatively nonstick) and potentially for “seasoning” carbon steel, SS and aluminum, but not much else, since it doesn’t translate to actual food temperature. There’s also the issue of the temperature settings *starting* at 285F, so holding a lower temperature for, e.g., tempering chocolate or a sous vide bath, or even a simmer would be by-guess-by-golly just like any other hob—your only resort is lots of experience with lower *power* settings.
       
      With heat-tarnished copper, a 350F setting resulted in a wide swinging between 353F and 365F, which I attribute to the copper shedding heat far faster than the other constructions, once the circuit stops the power at temperature. Then, when the circuit cycles the power back on, the copper is so responsive that it quickly overshoots the setting. Aluminum, on the other hand, *undershot*, the 350F setting, registering a cycle of 332-340F.

      I conclude that the IR sensor is set for some particular emissivity, probably for that of stainless steel. If true, the Panasonic, even though it automatically switches frequencies, does not compensate for the different emissivities of copper and aluminum. And even if Panasonic added dedicated aluminum and copper IR sensors, there is enough difference between dirty and polished that the added cost would be wasted. Bottom line here: the temperature setting mode is of extremely low utility, and should not be trusted.
       
      B. Power Mode – Pan Material Comparisons
       
      Given the differences in power setting granularity and maximum power between the two frequencies, it is difficult to assess what X watts into the pot means in, say, a copper-versus-clad or –disk showdown. What is clear, however, is that Setting X under disk and clad seems “hotter” than the same setting under copper and aluminum.

      I will need to precisely calibrate the Panasonic for wattage anyway for the hyperconductivity project, so I will obtain a higher-powered watt meter to determine the wattage of every power setting for both frequencies. Until then, however, the only way I can fairly handicap a race is to apply a reduction figure to the ferromagnetic setting (2400W being 69% of 3500W). Given that we know the wattage at the maximum settings, we can infer that Setting 14 (actually 13.8) on the 20-step ferromagnetic range iis approximately the same heat output as the maximum setting (18) for copper/aluminum.

      The boil times for 4 liters of 50F water in 10” diameter pots shocked me. The 10” x 3mm tinned copper pot’s water reached 211F in 36:41. Not an especially fast time at 2400 watts. The 10” disk-based pressure cooker bottom? Well, it didn’t make it—it took an hour to get to 208F and then hung there. So that left me wondering if the Panasonic engineers simply decided that 2400 watts was enough for copper and aluminum. I have a theory why the copper pot boiled and the SS one didn’t under the same power, but getting into that’s for another time.

      C. Evenness Comparisons
       
      The wires which generate the induction field are wound in a circular pattern; when energized, they create a torus-shaped magnetic field. The wound coil is constructed with an empty hole at its center. As matters of physics, the magnetic field’s intensity drops off extremely fast as a function of the distance from the coil; a few millimeters above the Ceran, the field is so weak no meaningful heat will be generated. This means that most induction cooktops heat *only* the very bottom of pans, and in a distinct 2-dimensional “doughnut” shape.

      All of the above can result in a pan having a cooler central spot, a hotter ring directly over the coil, and a cooler periphery outside the coil. It is left to the cookware to try to even out these thermal discontinuities when cooking. Some materials and pan constructions are better at this than others: the successful constructions utilize more highly-conductive metals such as aluminum and copper, but unless the material is very thick, there can be a ring-shaped hotspot that can scorch food.
      Until the Panasonic arrived to market, hotspot comparisons between ferromagnetic and aluminum/copper pans depended largely on comparing induction’s flat, more discrete heat ring with gas’s more diffuse, 3-dimensional one. Dodgeball-style debate ensued, with few clear conclusions. But now, for the first time, equally-powered flat heat rings in two different frequencies allow us to directly compare evenness in ferromagnetic and aluminum/copper cookware.

      The simplest and easiest way to assess cookware evenness is the “scorchprint”, which does not require infrared or other advanced thermal imaging equipment. I’ve posted on how to conduct scorchprinting elsewhere, but basically a pan is evenly dusted with flour; heat is applied to the pan bottom. As the flour is toasted, any hotspots visually emerge, giving the viewer a useful general idea of evenness.
       
      I will later post the photos of scorchprints I made of 4 different pans run using the Panasonic KY-MK3500: (1) a Demeyere 28cm Proline 5* clad frypan; (2) a Fissler Original Profi disk-base 28cm frypan; a 6mm aluminum omelet pan; and (4) a 32cm x 3.2mm Dehillerin sauté. To make it a fair race, I heated all the pans at 2400W until they reached 450F, and then backed off the power setting to maintain 450F. I did this in order not to compromise my saute’s tin lining. As you will see, both the clad Demeyere and the disk-based Fissler did print the typical brown doughnut, with a cooler center and periphery. By far the most even was the thick, all-aluminum pan, which actually was even over its entirety—even including the walls. The copper sauté was also quite even, although its larger size and mass really dissipated heat; once 450F was dialed in, no more browning happened, even after 30 minutes.
       
      I conclude that the straightgauge pans were far more effective at shunting heat to their peripheries and walls (and also to some extent into the air) than the clad and disk-based pans. The latter accumulated their heat with most of it staying in the center of the pans. Eventually, even the “doughnut hole” blended into the scorch ring because the walls were not bleeding sufficient heat away from the floor. This was especially pronounced in the Fissler, the high wall and rim areas of which never exceeded 125F. The aluminum pan, in contrast varied less than 30F everywhere on the pan.

      D. Other Considerations

      The Panasonic’s fan noise at the cook’s position was noticeable at 63 dBA, higher than with the VMP’s 57 dBA. These levels are characterized as “normal conversation” and “quiet street”, respectively. Interestingly, I found two other, potentially more important differences. First, the Panasonic’s fan stays on, even after the unit is powered off, whereas the VMP’s fan shuts off immediately when the hob is turned off. Second, the Panasonic’s fan steps down from the louder speed to a much quieter (47 dBA, characterized as “quiet home”) level until the Ceran is cool to sustained touch, at which point it shuts off completely. I think the Panasonic’s ability to continue to vent and cool itself is a great feature, especially since a cook could leave a large, full, hot pan on the glass.

      The glowing circle is useless for gauging heat setting or intensity. And while it works to indicate a hot surface, it remains lit long after you can hold your hand in place dead center.
       
      VI. Summary and Lessons
       
      The Panasonic KY-MK3500 is a solid unit, well-conceived and rugged. It is extremely easy to use. It works well with both the common 24kHz frequency used with ferromagnetic cookware, and the 90kHz frequency chosen here for copper and aluminum. It effectively and automatically switches between the two.

      In my opinion, it points the way to expanding the worldwide induction appliance market to include dual frequencies. It also obviates the need to: (a) junk otherwise excellent cookware merely to have induction; and (b) retrofit designs to bond on ferromagnetic outer layers. In fact, in my opinion, my tests indicate that, in a dual-frequency world, adding ferromagnetic bottoms may well be a drag on pans’ performance.
       
      I also consider the Panasonic Met-All to be ground-breaking in what it can tell us about *pans*, because all metallic pans are now commensurable on induction. Clearly (to me anyway), watt-for-watt, the copper and aluminum pans performed better than did the clad and disk-based pans on this unit. Boil times were faster, there was less propensity to scorch, and the conductive-sidewall pans definitely added more heat to the pans’ contents. We may ultimately find that 90kHz fields save energy compared to 24kHz fields, much as copper and aluminum require less heat on gas and electric coil.
      In terms of heat transfer, the copper and aluminum pans came close to emulating the same pans on gas. And at 2400W/3500W it has the power of a full size appliance in a relatively small tabletop package.
       
      The Panasonic is far from perfect, however. It can’t really be considered portable. There are far too few temperature settings, and what few it has are not accurate or consistent in terms of judging pan contents and attaining the same temperature in different pans (and even the same pan unless clean). The luminous ring could easily have been made a useful indicator of intensity, but wasn’t. And it lacks things that should be obvious, including a through-the-glass “button” contact thermocouple, more power granularity, an analog-style control knob, and capacity to accept an external thermocouple probe for PID control.
       
      Most importantly for me, the Panasonic KY-MK3500 portends more good things to come. Retail price remains $1,700-$2,400, but I jumped on it at $611, and I’ve seen it elsewhere for as low as $1,200.
       
      The manual can be found here: ftp://ftp.panasonic.com/commercialfoo...
       
      Photo Credit:  Panasonic Corporation

    • By artiesel
      THE BOOKS ARE SOLD
       
       
      I have Volumes 1 ,2 and 4 of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's Great Chocolate books are for sale.
       
      The books are in great shape!  There is some tape on the corner of the front of volume 1 that I used to keep it together after a drop.  Volume 1 is also autographed by the author (See pics below).
       
      I'm asking $150 for the lot OBO.
       
      Let me know if interested or if you have questions
       
       
       



    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
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