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ShaneH

"Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold, Young & Bilet (Part 3)

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I've got a question about MC. I've got MC@H and I love it.

We're remodeling our kitchen and I now have a Thermadore Steam Oven.

I've used it a few times now, and made fish based off of a chart in MC@H.

Will I find a ton more info in MC about using a steam oven (called a combi oven in MC@H)??

I just know it's got something, but will I be disappointed?

Thanks!

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Ok let me try that again - with a bit more factual based question.

Is there a page count or recipe count of how much MC devotes to a steam oven?

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If you're looking for a huge section on combi ovens then yes, I think you'll be disappointed. I don't have it in front of me right now, but my recollection is that there were a few pages dedicated to it, but nothing that I'd call "extensive" the way, say, sous vide is covered. You're not going to want to buy MC just for that!


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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there are 28 or so ref.s to steam ovens in the index and about 25 pages or so in Vol 2 'Equipment'

there are some by IDX in vol 3 but not much. the Rx's tables etc are in Vol 2

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If you're looking for a huge section on combi ovens then yes, I think you'll be disappointed. I don't have it in front of me right now, but my recollection is that there were a few pages dedicated to it, but nothing that I'd call "extensive" the way, say, sous vide is covered. You're not going to want to buy MC just for that!

there are 28 or so ref.s to steam ovens in the index and about 25 pages or so in Vol 2 'Equipment'

there are some by IDX in vol 3 but not much. the Rx's tables etc are in Vol 2

Thanks - this helps me hold off on MC a bit longer - I have wanted to get my hands on it for a while - but it's not cheap and an entire kitchen remodel is spendy enough.

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Actually, Raamo, I stand corrected by rotuts: now that I've got the books in front of me, I see that 2•155–2•181 is entirely about this type of oven (including five full-page recipes). While not as extensive as the massive section on sous vide, it's a pretty big chunk of information. I'm still not sure you can justify the price tag on that information alone, but it's pretty detailed.

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Chris Thanks again - I'll have the books in June... If I can wait that long. I've already got most of the equipment recommended from MC@H.

With that info... I'm assuming I can prioritize the books over a chamber vacuum, The price keeps falling on chamber vacuums so I'll get one some day. Just find zip log bags work very well for everything we've been doing.

It's hard to get good solid info when you're on the bleeding edge of in home technology :(

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Hi! First off I'd like to introduce myself to everyone here at eGullet... I am a young aspiring chef living in the southeastern US; I've been scrolling through the forums here for a little while now and have decided to join in the discussions. I feel certain that there is much knowledge to be gained here and that I have a thing or two to add so thanks for the opportunity!

 

Anyways; I've been hearing a lot about the book "Modernist Cuisine" and am wondering if it is worth the price... obviously that depends on who is buying the book but what is your opinion?

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It's not a topic that generally interests me (too much gadgetry. :)  ), but there's a thread about cooking from this book: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144706-cooking-with-modernist-cuisine-at-home-part-2/?view=findpost&p=1960023&hl=%2Bmodernist+%2Bcuisine .  That might give you some more insight. And welcome!


Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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Part 1 of the thread that Allura linked to is here.

Note that the thread refers to Modernist Cuisine at Home. I think there is a separate thread for the other version.

ETA: Here is the other thread. You'll probably want to clarify which one you mean.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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Hi! First off I'd like to introduce myself to everyone here at eGullet... I am a young aspiring chef living in the southeastern US; I've been scrolling through the forums here for a little while now and have decided to join in the discussions. I feel certain that there is much knowledge to be gained here and that I have a thing or two to add so thanks for the opportunity!

 

Anyways; I've been hearing a lot about the book "Modernist Cuisine" and am wondering if it is worth the price... obviously that depends on who is buying the book but what is your opinion?

If you are working in the business the books might be a very good starting point to have a lot of knowledge combined in one place. It will give you a lot of ideas where you can go with more advanced (modernist) cooking methods but gives you also a lot of understanding about all "old" aspects of cooking. For a chef I would avoid Modernist Cooking at Home

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I strongly recommend that you take a look at it before considering a purchase.

You should be able to, hopefully, find it within a reasonable distance.

 

http://www.worldcat.org/


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Depending on where in the southeast you are: more than a few restaurant kitchens in the Atlanta area have bought copies and passed them around among staff. A friendly phone call might get you in one of those loops, or point you to an owner closer to you.


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I strongly recommend that you take a look at it before considering a purchase.

You should be able to, hopefully, find it within a reasonable distance.

 

http://www.worldcat.org/

What he said.  But to clarify what he said, GO TO THE PUBLIC LIBRARY (either in person or via your local library's website).  If your library doesn't have it (my rural system does, so don't be surprised if yours has the multi-volume set), then you can certainly order it via interlibrary loan.  You don't list your state or city, but every single southeastern state has a public library system, and most have interlibrary loan features via their websites.  It's already bought & paid for with your tax dollars.

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Check out chefsteps.com for free modernist recipes. 

 

"We are Chris Young, Grant Crilly, and Ryan Matthew Smith—all alumni of the creative team that produced Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking."

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Check out chefsteps.com for free modernist recipes. 

 

"We are Chris Young, Grant Crilly, and Ryan Matthew Smith—all alumni of the creative team that produced Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking."

I just did their souffle recipe, and it was fantastic. The green eggs and ham was tasty too.

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I made watercress puree from Chefsteps.  It was super bright green and tasted very much of watercress.  Served it as a backdrop for scallops and used in risotto the next day.  Wish I took pictures... May be Chefsteps deserves its own thread.

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These books are huge and well made, filled with beautiful photographs and tons of information. Given that you can buy all six volumes for about the same (or even less) than dinner for two at a 3 star restaurant, I think it's well worth the money especially if you're a professional. The set costs less than my circulator did! Though the books have a lot of recipes, I mostly use MC as a reference work and resource for learning about novel (and traditional) cooking techniques. It's definitely not your standard cookbook. MC@H is more of a traditional cookbook in this regard, with step-by-step photos throughout and a focus on providing recipes (as well as a bit of science behind certain techniques).

I don't own MC yet, but have read it through twice via my university library. I own MC@H and several other techy cookbooks (el Bulli, Alinea, Under Pressure) and would love to own the full version of MC. I haven't purchased it yet for purely budgetary reasons. MC@H is a fantastic book if you are just wanting to get your feet wet. There are lots of recipes, and lots of variations... I've gotten more out of MC@H than any other cookbook I own. I even see value in having MC@H in addition to the full blown MC given that the recipes in MC@H tend to focus on perfecting familiar dishes like chicken wings, mac and cheese, or pesto than on elaborate plated dishes.

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Thanks for the advice and all... chefsteps.com looks like an incredible resource! I took a leap of faith and placed an order for the books just now; the anticipation is going to drive me insane

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A lot of us were there, waiting for MC to arrive especially when books were on back order.  You will enjoy your purchase.  

 

And you will buy more things.

 

And more things.

 

Joining eGullet is free but it may cause frequent episodes of compulsive shopping.

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yeah I've already got dozens upon dozens of pages bookmarked of stuff I want... no... NEED! I need to organize it and put together a plan for purchasing what and when before my next several paychecks disappear along with my entire savings account...

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I finally obtained my own copy of MC. I've cooked one set of things from it and done a LOT of reading.

 

And my dreams of owning a centrifuge have been dashed - they suggest ones the size of a washing machine (the only centrifuge I'll own for now) and are pretty spendy.... just no place for that in my house.

 

It is interesting how steam ovens have changed since 2010 - there are a lot more avalible now.

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