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ShaneH

"Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold, Young & Bilet (Part 3)

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Keep in mind that even bothering to track, let alone publish errata is rare in the cookbook industry.

Its pretty common practice with text books and science books, which this pricy beast more closely resembles.

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Keep in mind that even bothering to track, let alone publish errata is rare in the cookbook industry.

Its pretty common practice with text books and science books, which this pricy beast more closely resembles.

Agreed. At that price level it is quite common with science books (and I would call MC one) to publish errata etc.

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I think the website version (rather than the PDF) is newer: at least, the two corrections I sent in last week are up there.

Thanks for pointing this out, I saw the last updated date hadn't changed and assumed the web listings weren't either. After you mentioned this I checked and two corrections I sent back in 7/2011 were also now listed there as well. They should update the pdf and 'last updated'. I wonder just how many people have been sending in possible duplicate corrections all this time. It would save work on our and their end if they kept it more up to date and made it clear when it was updated.

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Hi everyone,

Thank you for pointing out that we hadn't updated the errata pdf. We last updated the errata on the web page on March 12th. Unfortunately, the pdf was too big to upload.

Our question to you guys is, what would you like us to do? Should we make separate pdfs for each volume? Should we take out any errata that is not from a recipe?

How can we make this page more usable for you?

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I'd love separate pdfs for each volume that list merely recipe and parametric table corrections. I'd print each volume's pdf, stick it into the front cover, and have it available for a quick check whenever I get out the volume. Personally, I'm not too worried about the non-recipe errata.

Thanks for asking. Really: thanks.

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Yes, per volume would be pretty usable, probably more so then the current format. I like the non-recipe errata, but it definitely isn't necessary.

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I agree that a per-volume layout would be fine. I also agree that the recipe errata are the most important. That said - and here's where I get annoying - I think that errata in the text are important where they affect our understanding of the concepts. Simple typographical errors, where the real meaning is easily grasped, matter less. Of course, it then becomes a challenge deciding which are which.

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Judy, thanks to everyone for publishing the errata. I wish that every publisher would do this.

A per volume errata would be very helpful. I would like it to contain all of the corrections (not just the recipe errata).

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Talk about an unfair fight: Modernist Cuisine is up against The Art of Living According to Joe Beef at the Beard Awards on Friday night.

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I'd like the errata to be separated by printing as well. If you have the second printing, as I do, it's a bit of a pain to spend time checking corrections that are already corrected.

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I'd like the errata to be separated by printing as well. If you have the second printing, as I do, it's a bit of a pain to spend time checking corrections that are already corrected.

+1 by volume & printing!

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Think it was mentioned up thread but could you also put on a date of inclusion of each new error? Then those of us who have previously done modifications only need to do the new ones.

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In a startling upset tonight, Modernist Cuisine triumphed over The Art of Living According to Joe Beef at the Beard Awards.

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The Modernist team has announced a "new" book: Modernist Cuisine at Home. The press release is here. Nathan says:

Although we kept Modernist Cuisine in the title, this new book is not a condensed version of its predecessor. If you want to learn about food safety, microbiology, the history of foie gras cultivation, or hundreds of other topics, Modernist Cuisine is still the book to turn to.

This book focuses on cooking equipment, techniques, and recipes. Part One details tools, ingredients, and cooking gear that we think are worth having. Equipment once available only to professional chefs or scientists is now being manufactured for the home kitchen; we encourage you to try it. But we also show you how to get by without fancy appliances, such as how to cook fish sous vide in your kitchen sink and how to cook steak in a picnic cooler.

Part Two contains 406 recipes, all of which are new. In some cases, we took popular Modernist Cuisine recipes— Caramelized Carrot Soup (see page 178), Mac and Cheese (see page 310), and Striped Mushroom Omelet (see page 148)—and developed simpler versions.

The book is $115, so not cheap (at that price, I suspect the original's production values have been maintained), but more affordable than Modernist. Here's an Amazon link for pre-order.

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The Modernist team has announced a "new" book: Modernist Cuisine at Home. The press release is here. Nathan says:

Although we kept Modernist Cuisine in the title, this new book is not a condensed version of its predecessor. If you want to learn about food safety, microbiology, the history of foie gras cultivation, or hundreds of other topics, Modernist Cuisine is still the book to turn to.

This book focuses on cooking equipment, techniques, and recipes. Part One details tools, ingredients, and cooking gear that we think are worth having. Equipment once available only to professional chefs or scientists is now being manufactured for the home kitchen; we encourage you to try it. But we also show you how to get by without fancy appliances, such as how to cook fish sous vide in your kitchen sink and how to cook steak in a picnic cooler.

Part Two contains 406 recipes, all of which are new. In some cases, we took popular Modernist Cuisine recipes— Caramelized Carrot Soup (see page 178), Mac and Cheese (see page 310), and Striped Mushroom Omelet (see page 148)—and developed simpler versions.

The book is $115, so not cheap (at that price, I suspect the original's production values have been maintained), but more affordable than Modernist. Here's an Amazon link for pre-order.

It's cheaper at Amazon.ca just as the original was.

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I'm not sure I like the new website. The original one wasn't that great, but now it seems even harder to find anything. Where have the errata gone?

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Where have the errata gone?

Took me a while to find as well. It's on the bottom under contact.

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snap it up .ca they will get you for the rest in a few days!

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I wish they would sell part 2, the recipes, separately for those of us that already bought the original.

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Ed, I thought that the recipes are largely from the original set, just selected for their approachability for home kitchens? Trying to find more, I read this:

http://seattlefoodge...-at-home/ from a guy that is evidently part of the group that put this together, and it does sound like new recipes. Anyone have more definitive info on this?

[Edited to fix broken link]


Edited by Dexter (log)

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I know the MC team wrote the @home material with owners of the original set in mind. Even though the primary goal is to reach a new audience, the old audience was considered such that the new book acts as volume 6 and the kitchen manual is kitchen manual part 2. In advance of actually seeing it, I'll say I believe the material is mostly different enough that the @home acquisition is worthwhile even if you have a full original set.

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