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Kerry Beal

Baking from "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza"

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This is the same technique as the Modernist Cuisine folks, and I've been using it (with a baking steel) for months.

Is it? I don't have the book but Modernist's online "How to make perfect pizza" article doesn't utilize the broiler. By the way, I didn't think their "perfect pizza" looked very appealing (this coming from the lady with the burnt crust:)). Like every other source I've read, they add the cheese at the beginning of the break. I find that cheese "breaks" into an oily indistinct mass if added too early.

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This is the same technique as the Modernist Cuisine folks, and I've been using it (with a baking steel) for months.

Is it? I don't have the book but Modernist's online "How to make perfect pizza" article doesn't utilize the broiler. By the way, I didn't think their "perfect pizza" looked very appealing (this coming from the lady with the burnt crust:)). Like every other source I've read, they add the cheese at the beginning of the break. I find that cheese "breaks" into an oily indistinct mass if added too early.

It is the technique from the original MC books, p 2•26–2•27. The trick though is to not just "put the stone as close to the broiler as possible", but rather to find your broiler's "sweet spot," which is a function of the spacing between the heating element's bars. For my oven it's actually the second setting from the top, for example.

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Yes, I think it was this lovely pizza that pointed me in the direction of Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast. It's a beautiful pizza! I wonder if you are using cooked or raw sausage? In my old way of cooking pizza, I used uncooked because it would cook in the 12 minutes needed for baking the pie. But with just 5 minutes in the oven, I wonder if I'll need to precook the sausage.

Teapot, I have been using his method. Really happy with the way my pizzas are turning out.

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%

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I am really enjoying this thread. I have been inspired to finish reading the book. My first attempt was the Saturday White Bread which came out great. Today, I'm making another Saturday bread but with a mix of whole wheat.


Anne Napolitano

Chef On Call

"Great cooking doesn't come from breaking with tradition but taking it in new directions-evolution rather that revolution." Heston Blumenthal

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Saturday bread (which can apparently be made on Friday!). Purpose baked to sop up the sauce from Moules Provencale planned for this evening.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Made overnight whole wheat bread. Except I made it "overday" on Friday. Did not read the instructions carefully. Apparently it needed to rise at room temperature for 5 hours, shaped and refrigerated after that. Due to having to go to work (bummer) I had to adjust the schedule. Mixed in the morning, put in refrigerator for about 10 hours, took out after work, let it rise at room temperature for couple of hours.

Somewhat dense but still very tasty. I will have to make it the right way for comparison.

IMG_0648.jpg

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I've done the same - given the dough it's 3 or 4 folds - then popped in the fridge overnight (or for the day). Then brought to room temperature, shaped and either back in the fridge or on the counter for a couple of hours until it pokes as it should.

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Levain pizza dough that I've had in the fridge for about a week and a half - used a cast iron griddle flat side in the oven as my pizza stone.  Much more satisfactory browning on the crust this time around.  

 

IMG_1104.jpg

 

IMG_1107.jpg

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I really appreciate all of this discussion and illustration, which I'm following along even when I can't be near the oven. 

 

This weekend I've cracked the book twice. Friday night, I made the dough for the Overnight White Bread (using King Arthur AP flour) and then had to modify the plan due to three guests, aged 9, 17, and 35, unexpectedly coming over. So I switched up and made the dough into five pizzas. No photos -- production was a bit harried -- but a few takeaways: 

 

-- If you're experienced with shaping and tossing storebought or industrial (non-artisanal) dough, note that this dough is far more gassed than quick doughs. I think Forkish's recommendation to keep in as much air gas as possible makes sense for novices likely to roll it all out, but I respected the gas to the nth degree on the first two pies and got crazy spring and air in the oven. The last three I admit to squeezing out a few bubbles here and there, especially at the edges, and got a more reasonable edge crust. 

 

-- I kept the balls in the fridge (really on the very cold porch) and they were extremely workable, very easy to get thin. However, I was consistently making pies that were bigger than 12", prompting me to plan next time to create six and not five balls of dough. 

 

-- As others have mentioned, I regularly precook the ingredients and try to keep things as dry as possible. One good technique is to put sliced mushrooms into the microwave for a couple of minutes between paper towels, which dries them out significantly. 

 

Today I'm making the bread I need for the week using the Saturday White Bread recipe for the first time. Does anyone know why Forkish only calls for two folds? I've been doing three on the other breads. 

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Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Here's that Saturday bread (made Sunday): 

 

Saturday bread.jpg

 

Before I started baking from this book I'd have said this was a pretty good loaf. But the flavor development and density don't come close to the overnight loaves. Still, it'll make for good toast, croutons, and grilled cheese. 

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Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Saturday bread made as a present for neighbors who invited us over for dinner.

Image 4.jpg

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So, finally got around to trying this, started with the Saturday bread, but made it with 680 Sonoran white wheat 00; 110 first clear from KA; and 110 organic Red Mill dark rye, with 80% hydration because it seemed so dry.  All was well until I went to put it in the oven and boom, we had a power outage (huge storm here, first rain in months) that lasted about 45 min. I had to refrigerate it. When the power came back on, had to wait for oven to preheat...here it is. All things considered, not bad...a bit overproofed...or...who knows. Flavor pretty good, but I think if just made with all a-p I would be underwhelmed. I had divided the other half of the dough, proofed half of that overnight in fridge, then turned it over into my iron crepe pan and baked it..should have slashed top but forgot. Was fine baking in an open pan.

 

Maybe it was worth it? Ran outside to snap this rainbow.Rainbow1 compressed.jpg

Forkish bread baked compressed.jpg

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Here is the Harvest Bread with Poolish. I used pumpernickel instead of whole wheat, but did use wheat germ. Increased hydration a little--just because I do. I think is very good, and a breeze to make. I again dumped one of the loaves onto my iron crepe pan and baked uncovered; this works great and if you are in a hurry, is done in about 30 min; crust gets very dark although not as pretty as in pot.The loaf shown was baked in the dutch oven for 45 min. 

 

Harvest baked comp.jpg

Harvest sliced comp.jpg

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A few additional notes. I've converted to three, not two, dutch ovens, as the ones I've cobbled together are a bit smaller than the 4.5 quart ones Forkish recommends. Not surprisingly, I'm getting much better spring and thus better bread. I've also been experimenting with the outer limits of the triple rise, given that we have a cold (~60F usually) New England kitchen and thus a lot of room for error. More time = better bread, unsurprisingly. 


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Saturday bread with "ears"! Happened when the dough got hung up on the edge of the Dutch oven.

image.jpg

Close up of the ears. Blame it on the Hanky Panky cocktail I had this afternoon. I admire people who can drink and cook.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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A few additional notes. I've converted to three, not two, dutch ovens, as the ones I've cobbled together are a bit smaller than the 4.5 quart ones Forkish recommends. Not surprisingly, I'm getting much better spring and thus better bread. I've also been experimenting with the outer limits of the triple rise, given that we have a cold (~60F usually) New England kitchen and thus a lot of room for error. More time = better bread, unsurprisingly.

Chris,

I have also improved my oven spring but by taking much more time and attention to detail when "tightening" my boules. Three Dutch ovens would be great. How did you cobble them together?


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I must say, the bread you all make from FWSY is stunning.

 

I hope one day to move in this direction, but first I need a 'pot' w lid that can fit in my BV-XL Toaster-Boy.

 

I have a Lodge 10 1/2 " cast iron pot, but it wont fit in w the cast iron lid.

 

if anyone can think of a cast iron or other suitable pot that would work in the BV so I can make this bread

 

Id be grateful for that info and tips.

 

:biggrin:

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I must say, the bread you all make from FWSY is stunning.

 

I hope one day to move in this direction, but first I need a 'pot' w lid that can fit in my BV-XL Toaster-Boy.

 

I have a Lodge 10 1/2 " cast iron pot, but it wont fit in w the cast iron lid.

 

if anyone can think of a cast iron or other suitable pot that would work in the BV so I can make this bread

 

Id be grateful for that info and tips.

 

:biggrin:

I have a small enamelled cast iron lidded casserole which fits fine but, of course, it would make a very small loaf. I would be happy to test this out for you but not sure how it would benefit you unless you could find a similar sized receptacle. But if you think an experiment would help I'd be happy to oblige.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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thank you  thats very kind.

 

Ill take a rain check until I find the container that fits my BV.

 

then Ill take you up on that.

I dont mind a small loaf, as its better than no loaf at all

 

my Home Made ( Machine ) bread is fine for toast and sandiwiches.

 

not so good with dinner and of course

 

Cheese !

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