Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

teapot

Super Bowl 2014 -- Feast mode!

Recommended Posts

So excited that our Seattle Seahawks are in the Super Bowl this year! What are people making? Any Seahawk fans planning a Seattle-inspired menu? One that doesn't involve any last minute cooking?

I'm making sourdough bread and bacon/onion jam to go with someone's beef tenderloin. To bring in some Seattle touches, we'll have smoked salmon, a Northwest berry cobbler. And as a nod to Seahawk colors: blue corn chips and guacamole.

There'll be IPAs of course (Seattle's a very hopped up city)but I'm also trying to come up with a clever cocktail - or hawktail (I've thought of making blue rock candy to use as a sugar rim on a sage margarita).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woot! We're hosting a small gathering this year, half a dozen people, only cuz the Seahawks are in.

I think I'm going to make a chili as the main dish and throw some coffee in there. Maybe gyoza or teriyaki wings. Smoked salmon or shrimp cocktail. I still need a veg salad - probably Caesar salad.

For drinks, Northwest-style pale ale (it'll be local B.C. micro, though) and I dunno...margarita with blue curacao??? Starbucks coffee with dessert?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you gonna make Seachicken wings? :raz:


Seriously though, I don't have a dog in this years fight but it's football so I'll be watching. Haven't decided on the food yet. I tend to keep my football food to beer and stuff that can sit around on plates to be eaten as desired but I'm trying to convince myself to do a little more this time.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not doing anything for the super bowl or probably even watching it but, I have been having an urge to make Taquitos lately. This would be a good super bowl dish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huge Broncos fan here!!!! I'm brining a chicken tonight to make fried chicken. That's as far as I've gotten. It's just two of us, but I'm going to make a ton of food and cheer my team on :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Broncos fan as well, because I am a Tennessean and Peyton Manning is Da Man. Munchy stuff at my house for three or four of us. Beer candied bacon. Fingerling potatoes topped with cream cheese and caviar. A big loaf of rye bread with pastrami and cheese baked inside it, and maybe some red cabbage on the side. Something sweet, yet to be determined.

Nobody gives a rat about the ballgame but me, but they'll all eat the goodies.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Broncos fans, I'm trying to think of any food that Denver is known for ... rocky mountain oysters?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Broncos fans, I'm trying to think of any food that Denver is known for ... rocky mountain oysters?

Hmmmm…..good question! Here I was just trying to think of some blue and orange foods I could make :) First thing that comes to mind is a Denver omelette. Oh and Fat Tire beer is brewed there, I believe. I'll keep thinking. OH and I'll ask mom, she still lives in Colorado.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coors

available everywhere Beer is Sold.

from Golden, CO just a hike north of denver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Broncos fans, I'm trying to think of any food that Denver is known for ... rocky mountain oysters?

Hmmmm…..good question! Here I was just trying to think of some blue and orange foods I could make :) First thing that comes to mind is a Denver omelette. Oh and Fat Tire beer is brewed there, I believe. I'll keep thinking. OH and I'll ask mom, she still lives in Colorado.

Spanish tortilla-style Denver omelette, maybe? Put it on slices of baguette?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always make a Pueblo Slopper, that's close enough to Denver. I was thinking of making some Slopper sliders.

Double fry chicken wings, lil smokies are one the menu as well.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Rocky Mountains High" brownies? Red River chili? John Denver milk punch? Colorado basically means "red", so make of that what you will! %)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rooting for the Seahawks here! Definitely going for chicken wings with some awesome sauce! Super Bowl NEEDS chicken wings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

don't you NE folks have

Red Hook ?

one might might develop a thirst ??

a loosing thirst ???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No plans for a party at my house. BUT planning to make something for GREAT nextdoor neighbor who ALWAYS rescues me when we get snow! He NICELY yells at me to go back inside when I come out with snow shovel & flat out refuses any monetary payment... even for his boys who he puts to work! Have made pepperoni bread in past... a HIT! Made a riff on that with "taco" bread. Maybe a big fat muffaletta sandwich... for the sports fans!?!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe a big fat muffaletta sandwich... for the sports fans!?!

That's something I haven't had in a long time... might have to think about doing that myself.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have made pepperoni bread in past... a HIT! Made a riff on that with "taco" bread. Maybe a big fat muffaletta sandwich... for the sports fans!?!

I'm making bacon levain from "Flour, Water, Yeast, Salt".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No plans for a party at my house. BUT planning to make something for GREAT nextdoor neighbor who ALWAYS rescues me when we get snow! He NICELY yells at me to go back inside when I come out with snow shovel & flat out refuses any monetary payment... even for his boys who he puts to work! Have made pepperoni bread in past... a HIT! Made a riff on that with "taco" bread. Maybe a big fat muffaletta sandwich... for the sports fans!?!

I think a muffaletta sounds like the perfect thing!!!! I wish you were my neighbor :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always make a Pueblo Slopper, that's close enough to Denver. I was thinking of making some Slopper sliders.

Double fry chicken wings, lil smokies are one the menu as well.

Thanks for the slopper reminder stckciv, best thing to eat in Colorado, pity anyone who hasn't had the pleasure.

Pueblo's two hours away so I don't get down to Gray's Tavern often, and my attempts at replicating the chili have never come close.

But, Kenji has done his Kenji thing with it, so I'm going to give it another try for the stuporbowl. Here's the link for anyone else so inclined:

http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/02/the-burger-lab-the-pueblo-slopper-and-how-to-make-pueblo-green-chili-colorado.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perfect mashup: Cannabis smoked salmon.

You know it's done when it's "flakey"

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up a bag of Rancho Gordo Yellow Eyed beans.recently. Time to do something wth them. Will work it into the game day menu. The bean soup with torn bread recipe I found online looks like a good starting place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You see this everywhere if you Google, "Americans to Eat 1.25 Billion Chicken Wings for Super Bowl XLVIII"

So that works out to be 337 wings per person, new borne babies included? May be my abacus needs new batteries.

dcarch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By markovitch
      A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good.
      has anyone made their own condiments before?
      care to share experiences?
    • By Rene_lorraine
      I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much. 
    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By pastrygirl
      If so, what was it like?  Sounds similar to kouign-aman ... https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-44486529
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×