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Twyst

"elBulli 2005–2011"

29 posts in this topic

I've wrapped up the 2010-11 Survey, put up a list of the 369 "makeable" dishes (i.e. no exotic equipment) along with some dehydrator comments and a couple new dishes aince the last post.

 

http://elbulliathome.blogspot.com/

 

I'm sure there are plenty of mistakes.

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