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Chef James

Montreal Smoked Turkey

8 posts in this topic

I would love it, if someone could help me ? Looking for any information about the history and the making of Montreal Smoked Turkey, which is heavily spiced and smoked. The Jewish people would buy them for Hanukah and the non-Jewish for Christmas. I have tried the web and only found "the jew and the carrot" blog. So Thank you for any help you can give me.

You friend from the USA

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I don't know about the history, though I do know it's still popular (we ship some Montreal smoked turkeys in for the Chanukah). Have you tried contacting any of the companies that do them in Montreal? Lester's and Schwartz's are just two companies that do them.

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Thanks for the reply, any help would be nice. Also I have work out my own recipe for the turkey, but would like to read some other ones, any ideas???

Again Thanks

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I have seen it both ways, like smoked meat and done as turkey if that makes any sense, just would like to know the right way. I plan to do it like smoked meat

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So basically its turkey pastrami. I'd check out that thread above...lots of discussion on spice mixes. How will you cook it?

I cook smoked turkey breast SV and it comes out beautifully. I cool smoke first then SV. I suppose that cure, followed by smoke and then SV would work if the cure wasn't too salty.


Edited by gfweb (log)

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inject, then brine and then smoke with hickory/apple mixture at 250 for about 25 to 30 minutes per pound.

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no, it is not like pastrami, it's like turkey. Sorry been on the PC to long today. They are done about the same, but the finish product is much better.

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