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Richard Kilgore

What Tea Are You Drinking Today? (Part 3)

438 posts in this topic

i like ''pu er'',it smells well,and it tastes great!

 

 

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Liuzhou Qingming Tea (柳州清明茶)

 

liuzhoutea.jpg

 

Liuzhou is the city I live in. In Guangxi Autonomous Region in the south of China. So a very local tea. I work right beside the plants. 

 

Qingming, for those who don' t know, is a festival to commemorate the ancestors (something taken very seriously in China). It usually takes place in April (it is calculated on the lunar calendar so it moves a bit).

 

Its use in the tea name just means that the tea was picked before Qingming. That is in spring.

 

It is very green in appearance and very herbal in taste. Grassy even. Probably not a classic tea, but perfectly acceptable and it's nice to try the local stuff.

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Greetings, everyone. This evening I'm enjoying a Wu Yi Yan Cha oolong from Goldfish Tea in Royal Oak, MI. Here is a nice article from Seven Cups about this famous style of oolong, and here is the Goldfish Tea page.

 

As I am partial to earthy teas (like raw pu-erh), I'm very much enjoying this oolong, which has a distinct earthy flavor.

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Hello- Lately, I have been drinking Lapsang Souchong from Goldfish Tea. I've also been drinking my green tea Tibetan-style (with butter).


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Curious about green tea with butter:  are you starting with a roasted or steamed green tea?  And how do you add the butter?  I know the traditional Tibetan-style tea has origins in   the compressed tea bricks that gave rise to puerh, which when young have a bit of green character to them, but after long travel/storage would be more earthy and dark. 

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Curious about green tea with butter:  are you starting with a roasted or steamed green tea?  And how do you add the butter?  I know the traditional Tibetan-style tea has origins in   the compressed tea bricks that gave rise to puerh, which when young have a bit of green character to them, but after long travel/storage would be more earthy and dark. 

Hello- My very personal, nontraditional take on this style: I combine 1t of matcha or a very similar green tea powder,  with 1 3/4-2 C hot water  and 2T butter in a blender. I blend it till I can't see the butter. Then I pour it into a large, clean jam jar and enjoy. I Know this is very strange and not everyone's *cup of tea* :shock:  :wacko:  :huh: I should try it with a black tea, but I am concerned because the blending/processing stage is a very important one and I have not yet found a way to get a leaf-type tea really smooth. If I could solve this problem, I might do a pu-erh.


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Curious about green tea with butter:  are you starting with a roasted or steamed green tea?  And how do you add the butter?  I know the traditional Tibetan-style tea has origins in   the compressed tea bricks that gave rise to puerh, which when young have a bit of green character to them, but after long travel/storage would be more earthy and dark. 

I just had a nice dark oolong. I thought it might be nice to brew a cup of that, or a nice strong black ,  add butter and blend....

 

I do not need leaves at all!


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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I am continuing my experiments with Tibetan-style tea. In my most recent (per)version, I brewed a full cup-liquid measure- of atomic strength Ceylon black. I put that and 2T of butter in a blender...the ultimate morning drink!

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"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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I know, I know. I should be drinking iced tea in this Texas summer; that's what all my friends tell me. But I had not ordered any Japanese green teas in several years, drinking black teas and Chinese Oolong and green teas in the meantime. So I recently took a look at http://www.yuuki-cha.com/, a dealer that has been good to us in the past by contributing organic Japanese teas for multi-person tea tastings here in the eGullet Coffee and Tea Forum, and ordered an Organic Karishima Matcha and a Sencha. I have not opened the Sencha yet, but the matcha made as usucha is excellent. Just checked and they are out of this matcha, but I am guessing they will get it in again, and there are several other matchas from which to choose.Today I whisked my bowl after pouring the water when it was at 158-160 F, and that produced a strong green, flavorful drink that was not too strong, not bitter. The whisking easily produced a bowl full of tiny bubbles, just like you want it to do.

 

I'll post something about the Sencha when I open it and have brewed it a few times.

 

No financial interest in yuuki-cha, just a satisfied customer, who is again contributing his tea dollars to the enterprise.

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I've been living on semi-iced Taiwanese oolong this summer, a not-too-pricey 'Zhangshu Lake Oolong' from Wing Hop Fung.  I take a small quantity of leaf, cover with boiling water, usually in a small porcelain gaiwan (it must be easy to pour brew and leaf out), wait 5-10 minutes, and pour the brew and leaf together into a large chawan or water bottle, fill the container with cold water, and ideally give it another 20-60 minutes before drinking.  So the leaves get a hot 'wake up', and I only have to heat a small amount of water, and drink cool lovely tea. Depending on how long the leaves stand before I drink it all, I sometimes try for a second brewing, especially to drink in the evening before bed. 

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I don't know how I missed those last two postings!

I have recently been drinking-gong fu style-a wonderful chen nian pu'er from the Golden Bridge Brand. I found it at a large oriental supermarket that opened recently in my area.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Very delicate white tea that we brought back from China.  Tin got damaged in transit but that's OK.

image.jpg

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