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Rafa

Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)

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Just to be clear, I didn't create the version with Campari and Ramazzotti. I got it from someone on chwhnd. This is indeed my favorite variation.

Gave this a whirl last night, very good indeed. I could see myself preferring this version in colder months and the original for warmer ones.

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Hassouni—I'm not sure whether you've tried it yet, but Old Grand Dad 114 sounds like it'd be right up your alley. High proof, high rye, with all the spice and kick you could want. A worthy upgrade to WT101,* both stronger and more refined, and I say that as a big fan of the turkey. I prefer OGD to most ryes I've tried, especially for sipping.

*Before tanstaafl2 objects/interjects, let me state that I know that OGD isn't a Turkey product, but a Beam-owned (or I suppose soon to be Suntory-owned) brand with a unique yeast and mashbill shared only with the (inferior imo) Basil Hayden.

Will keep that in mind, thanks

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Hassouni—I'm not sure whether you've tried it yet, but Old Grand Dad 114 sounds like it'd be right up your alley. High proof, high rye, with all the spice and kick you could want. A worthy upgrade to WT101,* both stronger and more refined, and I say that as a big fan of the turkey. I prefer OGD to most ryes I've tried, especially for sipping.

*Before tanstaafl2 objects/interjects, let me state that I know that OGD isn't a Turkey product, but a Beam-owned (or I suppose soon to be Suntory-owned) brand with a unique yeast and mashbill shared only with the (inferior imo) Basil Hayden.

No objection here! I will interject only to say I completely agree with you! OGD is an excellent alternative with a higher rye mashbill, thought to be about 27% rye and comes in three proofs, 114, 100 BIB and 80 (which was recently lowered from 86 with little fanfare).

OGD is about the only mashbill that was not changed by Beam to their usual mashbill with a different name slapped on it when they acquired it. They continue to use the same mashbill as it used when it came over from National Distillers (thankfully!) including a different yeast than other Beam products. Basil Hayden is the same mashbill as OGD only lower proof and higher cost. Go figure.

OGD is indeed a bargain that one can only hope won't change much, Suntory or no Suntory. High proof good quality whiskey aged maybe 7-8 years (hard to know these days for sure since it is no longer age stated) that sells for a relative pittance these days.

How long can this last in a world of whiskey shortages??? Along with other bargains like EC12 and Weller 12 one wonders if it may be the last of a dying breed.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I suspect so, though when the price hikes come, we can hardly blame Suntory. These bourbons are frankly underpriced. We're due for price increases across the board, and it's frankly surprising that an effectively barrel proof Old Grand Dad and 12 year old baby Pappy are still the bargains they are.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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"Pappy" and "bargain" are matter/anti-matter. They annihilate each other, releasing massive amounts of energy drunkenness.

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Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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A Last Word using clear bottle Bols Genever. Rocking.

And now, because I couldn't quite decide what to make, a Dark n Stormy using Gingerbeard and aged Cruzan.

And, lastly, a peaty Roy made with Ardbeg Uigeadail. A monster. The big Japanese kind that comes out of some radioactive cave, all bombarded by atomic bombs and woe, that attacks a fishing boat in the first scene and then fucks up a whole city.

Given I've been matching booze with songs lately, let's pair that one with the Gamera song from the movie in which a couple of kids wind up on a space ship and go to a strange planet and Gamera defends them from an alien beast. A Rob Roy with a barbaric Islay as opposed to a Speyside or Highland is something else, hey? I mean, compare a Blood and Sand made with a boring blend and one made with something like Talisker.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)
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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Still playing around with sherry, and with a bottle of Lustau manzanilla open, I opted tonight for the Choke Artist from Art of the Bar. Maybe it's just me, but I think this is one of the perfect drinks. The synergy that exists between sherry and Cynar always blows my mind.

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Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Tammany Hall last night, with sort-of Scotch (essence in home-made vodka - surprisingly convincing, actually), Ketel1 Genever, Punt e Mes, Benedictine and Angostura.

Very tasty. Another winner - thanks, Rafa.

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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For a change I'm enjoying a daiquiri made with Clement VSOP. (Also because I'm about out of Busted Barrel.) The Clement works tonight.

I appreciate the rye related responses. I was hoping to get to the store today to window shop, but I didn't make it. And what fun is window shopping? Any opinions on Knob Creek?

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Knob Creek is good stuff. It's a Jim Beam rye, the same stuff as Old Overholt, ri(1), and the eponymous label, though at a higher proof and presumably older. I like it, and it's better suited to sipping than Rittenhouse or Bulleit, but I strongly prefer Rittenhouse in most mixed drinks.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Gi' Punch

Seneca Drums Gin

small puddle cane syrup

coin of lime

1 ice cube

Really nice. This is a sipping gin.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Still playing around with sherry, and with a bottle of Lustau manzanilla open, I opted tonight for the Choke Artist from Art of the Bar. Maybe it's just me, but I think this is one of the perfect drinks. The synergy that exists between sherry and Cynar always blows my mind.

Here's a couple for you: The New Hickory (Cynar, Manzanilla, grapefruit and burlesque bitters), and my Old Spanish (Cynar, Manzanilla, raspberry syrup, tonic).


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Rafa, you're like a thirsty person's fairy godmother. :smile:


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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A Last Word using clear bottle Bols Genever. Rocking.

Thanks for the idea. I found the genever a touch subtle in this drink, and I bumped it up 1/4 oz plus used Leopold Maraschino. Next time I think I'll try 3:1:1:1 or 4:2:2:1 (with 1 being the Chartreuse). Worth revisiting.

I wonder if Tammany Hall would work with Punt e Mes...


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I curtailed a hard day's doing nothing much to take myself out to Happiness Forgets last night; here is the proof.

Bonnie Prince

Bailie Nicol Jarvie scotch, PX, Punt e Mes, Absinthe, Jerry Thomas Bitters and citric acid
001 (480x640).jpg

I really liked this drink, which I guess is an elaboration of a Robert Burns. Although they produce a very harmonious result the various elements remain distinct and it's possible to appreciate each part.

Dante

Tapatio Reposado, Kummel, Chartreuse, lime, cane syrup, basil, celery bitters

003 (480x640).jpg

As a herbivore I will never spurn a bit of greenery and I was interested in the use of basil here, but in fact I did not really enjoy this one, which I found sweet and sticky. Perhaps that's what cane syrup will do. The tequila was also extremely restrained and I thought it could have been more prominent for an improved balance, but I did like the big bits of plant matter and shards of ice. I spoke to my neighbour about this choice and she expressed a totally opposite opinion.

Perfect Manhattan

004 (480x640).jpg

The couple sitting by me worked for Pernod-Ricard and Havana Club and were spending a busman's holiday in the bar. I reckoned they knew whereof they spoke and since they told me it was their favourite place in London I picked their brains about what to order; this was Mamie's recommendation and she liked either it or me so much she bought me one. What a sweetheart.

At this point I became engaged in an involved conversation with a cage-fighting entrepreneur, so I didn't take any more pictures. I ordered the house Negroni. I was very, er, interested in my discussion and that caused me to forget some important details like what was in it and what it was called. The Count seems plausible. Anyway, the bitter side is quite attenuated by some additional ingredient and it's a very pleasant variant.

Happiness Forgets is super relaxed and friendly. The music is cool. The bartenders and hostess are very, very pretty. I can only criticise the unlikely orientation of the bathrooms, which open directly onto the bar ( :huh:). That struck me as a trifle indiscreet. I just prefer not to look at toilets. The bar menu is quite short but there's a proper range of options and the offering changes frequently so you won't get bored even if you go there all by yourself with a vague intention to do some reading over a quick drink and end up staying for five hours and being politely encouraged to go elsewhere because everyone who works there would like to leave soon... Julian who was serving my sector of the bar first came there on an exchange from the Goldene Bar in Munich and would not go home at the end, so it seems people like working as well as drinking there.

Well they would not allow me to stay any longer so I was forced back home to meet a friend. We resumed by leaping onto the Tammany Hall bandwagon. My guest said 'Oh God' with feeling when he tasted it and I could tell he meant it as he drank several. Thank you. Rafa :smile:

To conclude we made a couple of Sazeracs, and post a brief but necessary snooze, a cold shower and some jolt coffees it was work time. For my friend. :biggrin:

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Gah, I posted that in the wrong thread. Perhaps I am not as astute as I normally am. Hopefully it can be moved.

It will just stay here so the embarrassment is complete. :-)

Very nice summary. Seems like an interesting clientele too.

At this point I became engaged in an involved conversation with a cage-fighting entrepreneur, so I didn't take any more pictures. I ordered the house Negroni. I was very, er, interested in my discussion and that caused me to forget some important details like what was in it and what it was called. The Count seems plausible. Anyway, the bitter side is quite attenuated by some additional ingredient and it's a very pleasant variant.

Could it be the Harry Palmer? Or was it gin-based?

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It will just stay here so the embarrassment is complete. :-)

Fortunately I have long practiced sublimating my humiliations and transmuting them into neurosis, so this type of error barely registers on my self-esteem-o-graph now :biggrin:

Could it be the Harry Palmer? Or was it gin-based?

No, pretty sure it was a standard Negroni formulation, plus somethingorother that I can't remember. Guess I'll have to go back and check. Oh well.

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IIRC, Knob Creek 100 is smooth and sneaky! And damn tasty!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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IIRC, Knob Creek 100 is smooth and sneaky! And damn tasty!

Is that the rye or one of the Knob Creek bourbons?

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Archangel with Hendricks gin

I've been making a similar drink with Beefeater, Aperol, and cardamom bitters. The Arch is much mellower without the juniper bite, a nice change.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I almost started a thread "What didn't you buy at the liquor store today?" I had been broke but I got paid yesterday. Unfortunately when I got there the shelves were somewhat bare. I had a feeling this was not going to be a good experience when I saw the spot where Cointreau wasn't. (Yes, they did have tiny bottles.)

Pusser's? "Delivery didn't come."

Old Grand Dad 114? "Sold out."

Dickel's Rye" "Sorry, don't carry it."

As for rye, there were several choices: my fallback, I had told myself, was Rittenhouse. But I balked at $27 on the bottom shelf, particularly when the Heaven Hill bourbon next to it was in the single digits. (Not to mention last night my son cautioned me against anything from Heaven Hill.) I looked at the Knob Creek and Woodford a long time. But what I took home was McKenzie. A glass of which I just finished -- to gain some first impressions before mixing up my whiskey punch.

All the taste descriptions now make sense. Thank you. The McKenzie was a little sweeter than I expected, but I like the spirit and I like the spicyness. Not rough at all. I had been worried that rye would taste tannic the way Mount Gay Black Barrel rum does. No tannic taste in McKenzie's at least. I can't yet speak for other rye. Am I the only one who finds Black Barrel horridly tannic?

Since I'm sure everyone is wondering I got Grand Marnier in place of Cointreau. One can do worse than Grand Marnier for a Curacao. And for rum I restocked W&N. A girl can get pretty far on a bottle of W&N.

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Do you live near Watkins Glen, NY, where Finger Lakes Distilling is? I had their McKenzie rye. It is much stronger in rye flavor than any other rye I've had. If you like it neat, then you really like rye. I have recently seen their bourbon in Boston.

They make a ton of different things. Fun place to visit for a tasting, too.


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