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Rafa

Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)

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Playing around with the bottle of Bols Yogurt liqueur I recently picked up.

 

What is that like, actually?

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What is that like, actually?

Like yogurt. I mean, really remarkable like yogurt. It is thicker than a normal liqueur but not creamy-thick. Sweet but balances by a slight natural sourness. It is nice, but I would not drink it straight other than to taste, and I fear it has limited uses. It is new enough that there are not many recipes online, other than incredibly sweet ones. But, totally worth the 14 bucks I spent. I am excited to see what else I can do with it.

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Ordinarily I am not one to tipple after dining.  Therein lies a slippery slope.  Alas! tonight I fear I was seduced by a widow's kiss -- George Kappeler, Imbibe! pp 218-219:

 

1 oz Laird's 12

1/2 oz Benedictine

1/2 oz Yellow Chartreuse VEP

2 dashes Angostura

 

 

So smooth, so soft, so sweet.  So Radclyffe Hall.

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I've been on a real Zombie kick lately. I've settled, for the moment, on this trio of rums:

 

Appleton 12

Mount Gay XO (in place of the El Dorado, which is hard to find and very expensive here--and is the only demerara that's actually available, unless you count expensive plantation stuff)

Ron el Santiago (a Cuban rum--near the end of it, will replace it with some Havana Club

 

I'm happy with it. The only overproof rums I can access are unsuitable (Inner Circle Green), fiercely expensive for what they are (Bacardi) or substandard (Bundaberg). I think the drink is boozy enough, anyway. I use Cuban in place of Puerto Rican because the only PR rum that's readily available here is Bacardi.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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After my zombie earlier this evening I was looking for something different.  I'm having a Zamboanga Cocktail (Charles H. Baker Jr.):

 

1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand

1 teaspoon Maraschino

3 dashes pineapple syrup (scant 5 ml)

3 dashes Angostura

juice 1/2 lime

 

 

Garnished with a twist of lime.  Note:  I had only red olives, and rather than using the wrong olive I omitted the olive garnish altogether.  Baker does not specify.  What type of olive is traditional for a Zamboanga?

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Was looking for some bourbon cocktails to share with friends over the weekend beyond some of the ones I have made in the past and came upon one called the Mountain Man on Kindred Cocktails. Proved to be quite popular. Ended up using Buffalo Trace instead of Bulleit since that was what was readily available.  

 

Nice to add another option for using Bonal. Wouldn't have thought of using it and Cocchi Americano in the same drink though.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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After some consultation with Rafinho for drinks that use a shitload of lime juice (had to quickly use up the limes who sacrificed their skins for falernum), I found a drink called Cesar's Rum Punch in the Tiki+ app.

 

-2 oz Barbancourt (8 years old in my case)

-2 oz lime juice

-1 oz grenadine

-1 tsp simple syrup (so, my "grenadine" is really just pom. concentrate with some SS added, and actually needs dilution with water and more SS to be anything like grenadine, so the 1 oz grenadine + 1 tsp SS was fudged a bit)

-3 dashes Angostura bitters

 

Shaken and served over crushed ice. 

 

Hell of a drink. Quite tart, and the alcohol is really hidden. Dangerous stuff.

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Tonight, a Stirred Word.

 

3/4 oz Gin
3/4 oz Kirschwasser
1/2 oz Green Chartreuse
2 ds Orange bitters
1 bsp Lime juice (optional)
 
Stir, strain.
 
A salve in these low-lime times. 

Edited by Rafa (log)

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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My MIL is visiting so we stocked up on Australian (tawny) port for her to make the visit more relaxing for everyone.  

 

I was left alone for supper so it seemed to be a good time to finally try a coffee cocktail.

 

Nice.  I'd maybe leave out the sugar next time and/or bump up the brandy a bit.  I used Courvoisier so maybe something with a bit more assertiveness might be good to explore.  A lighter hand with the nutmeg would have been smart, too.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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The eGullet beacon shone brightly in North London last night, when I met up at 69 Colebrooke Row with two Canadian members representing Cooking and Spirits & Cocktails, and Confectionery respectively. What a great night; eGullet has more or less doubled my social circle so far.

 

There are pictures of drinks in here, honest... did not want to blind us all with the flash and the result is a touch dim.

 

Avignon
Merlet Cognac, Chamomile syrup, Smoked Frankincense
 

001 (640x480).jpg

 

We could smell this drink across the room but the frankincense was far more evident on the nose than the palate. The cognac fruit receded into a very smooth camomile sweetness on the sip and this seemed totally to eliminate the alcohol sensation on the swallow.

 

St James’ Gate
Myers Rum, Guinness Reduction, Lemon, Sugar (left)
 
Royal Oak
Acorn Liqueur, Oak Bitters topped with Champagne (right)
 
002 (640x480).jpg
 
The pruney molasses notes were on top in the St James' [sic] Gate and I was a bit disappointed not to detect more bitter Guinness; the foam, however, was just about the most solid we'd ever seen and we felt sorry for the washer upperer as it showed no inclination to disperse. 
 
I liked the Royal Oak; Tony Conigliaro's bars have quite a few of these sparkling wine drinks infused with woodland flavours (including mushrooms at the Grain Store) on menus at the moment and they are quite pleasing (I have made a study of this). My criticism would be that these drinks evolve fairly little but the infusions are subtle and earthy and work well with the acid in the wine. It's also nice to have something light on offer for more refined drinkers :biggrin:
 
We also checked out the Terroir (Distilled Clay, Flint and Lichen served straight from the bottle); the waitress explained that this was vodka redistilled with the addition of local, er, aromatics. In fact the flavours are rather attenuated, although we noted some 'pavementy' elements :biggrin:. The taste was not too far outside the range of flavours you'd expect from different vodkas. Worth trying but not explosive.
 
This bar is not ergonomic and we all had strain injuries by the end of the evening as tables are at knee-height, but the servers were at the constant ready with the water and offers of more drinks and we had some great craic. Thank you, visitors, for taking time during your holiday to meet!

Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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The pleasure was all ours; thank you, Plantes Vertes, for making the arrangements and taking time to meet with us, on a work night no less!

 

I ordered the Royal Oak as my first drink, and agree with Plantes Vertes: it was very pleasing, with more emphasis on the orthonasal aromatics than on the sip, but quite elegant. The only drawback was that it started to fall apart a bit as it warmed up, with the sweetness coming to dominate toward the end of the glass. (I know, I know: I just needed to drink it faster.)

 

After that, well... There was no way I was leaving without trying the Terroir. Again, there was a strong emphasis on the aroma over the sip, but what a fascinating aroma! Definite pavement characteristic, but also surprisingly floral. Somehow it called aquavit to mind. At the intensity it had, I don't think there's really much you could do with it beyond serve it cold and neat as they did, but I'm betting it would be fun to try and mix it anyway, perhaps with some of the lighter wines: dry vermouth, or perhaps manzanilla sherry.

 

All in all, a very successful night out!

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Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Tonight I had my very first dry martini (Imbibe! pp 246, 247).  And I believe my very first stirred drink ever:

 

1 1/2 oz Bombay

1 1/2 oz Vya dry

dash Angostura orange

 

 

Lemon twist and Castelvetrano/Nocellara del Belice olive.  Sadly I did not care much for the drink.  I had such high hopes!  All that came through was lemon oil.  (I may have gotten carried away with the twist.)  Though I must say the olive was fantastic and made the whole experience worthwhile.

 

In desperation fell back on a zombie.  Which hardly hurt at all.

 

I have studied all or most of the eGullet martini threads.  How can I make a good martini?

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The thing with the Dry Martini is that for many it lacks what bostonapothecary calls a "gustatory latch"—something obviously sweet, or savory, or sour to help the imbiber get her bearings. Its goal or effect is pretty much that of the classic cocktail, a magnified version of the base spirit with the spirituous burn attenuated, but without any sweetness to make it more palatable. I would experiment with adding a touch of simple syrup, or perhaps go full umami with some olive or pickle brine (there's a reason Dirty Martinis are popular). Or try it again as-is, and think of it as sipping a super version of gin.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I believe you like gin neat or straight now. I would go with a less extreme amount of vermouth. Rather than swing the pendulum all the way to 1:1, try maybe 5:1.

 

Also Vya is a bold and unique vermouth. Something more mainstream, like Dolin dry or Boissiere would be a good choice. I'm surprised that you complained of the lemon oil. I would think all you'd taste is the Vya.

 

Also try skipping the orange bitters. I know I will be beaten with a bottle of Wray & Nephew Overproof, but especially with an olive, I think it spoils the drink. There are way too many drinks with orange as a key flavor. I would also try it at least initially without the twist. I think the twist and olive are compatible, but not necessary. Either is sufficient. A big, vibrant green olive like a cerignola is awesome.

 

Personally I think sugar has no place in a Martini -- the ONLY popular cocktail that is neither sweet nor sour. 


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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4:1 is my jumping on point.  Easy to measure too.

Try discarding the lemon peel.


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I agree with Dan about leaving out the bitters when you use an olive, and I would also say if you are going the olive route skip the lemon twist as well. The variation in garnish makes a huge difference in this drink. Though I do enjoy a good 1:1 Martini with a twist and orange bitters, I find that more often I gravitate towards a 2:1 or 3:1 version with an olive or two. 

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The thing with the Dry Martini is that for many it lacks what bostonapothecary calls a "gustatory latch"—something obviously sweet, or savory, or sour to help the imbiber get her bearings. Its goal or effect is pretty much that of the classic cocktail, a magnified version of the base spirit with the spirituous burn attenuated, but without any sweetness to make it more palatable. I would experiment with adding a touch of simple syrup, or perhaps go full umami with some olive or pickle brine (there's a reason Dirty Martinis are popular). Or try it again as-is, and think of it as sipping a super version of gin.

 

the gustatory latch idea tries to explain the rules & patterns of enjoying spirits at room temp. so the latch of a martini made only with vodka or gin is that they are served stingingly cold. I've pulled so many of them off tables over the years where people didn't drink the last return to room temp ounce. the martini above has the acidity of the vermouth as a latch, but problem is its not the imbiber's favorite latch, rather it is still a distant acquired taste.

 

I don't think a change in dry vermouth brand will greatly change the enjoyment of the drink. it will just likely be pronounced as more or less ordinary as opposed to extraordinary.

 

martinis have such a unique structure, you have to be a complete weirdo or stress case to enjoy them on the first go. I'd keep drinking them especially when you have a really bad day and you will eventually come to appreciate and enjoy them in all their various skewed forms.

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creator of acquired tastes

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martinis have such a unique structure, you have to be a complete weirdo or stress case to enjoy them on the first go. I'd keep drinking them especially when you have a really bad day and you will eventually come to appreciate and enjoy them in all their various skewed forms.

 

 

Martinis; more a remedy for pain than a positive pleasure. :biggrin:

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Martinis; more a remedy for pain than a positive pleasure. :biggrin:

 

 

...you have to be a complete weirdo or stress case to enjoy them on the first go. 

 

Interesting. My alcohol education was, roughly:

Sweet juvenile crap (through high school only) > beer > Martinis & Scotch > Campari > Bitter cocktails > All craft cocktails, except sweet ones without bitterness

 

I liked Martinis from it git-go.


Edited by EvergreenDan (log)

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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I liked Martinis from it git-go.

Quoth the friend who introduced me to the Martini (in a college dorm in 1997): "Vermouth makes gin yummy."

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Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Quoth the friend who introduced me to the Martini (in a college dorm in 1997): "Vermouth makes gin yummy."

I wouldn't go quite that far, but while I can appreciate a 'proper' Martini, as a drink for pleasure rather than just alcohol I prefer a Reverse or Perfect Martini.

Keep playing, Jo. Next step is probably to dabble in the bitter end of the cocktail pool. Learn to enjoy a Negroni and you'll never be the same again.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

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Worried that the Vya was the reason I did not care for last night's martini, I am having a glass of Vya at the moment.  I must say I like it.  It is quite refreshing.

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Jo -- That's not inconsistent. I've only had one bottle of Vya. I liked it by itself, but I couldn't mix with it. It was just too bold. I'm still thinking the ratio and vermouth choice could be leading you astray. Fortunately, vermouth is cheap. If you don't like it, it's not the end of the world.

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Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Have not been mixing much lately but after an 18-hour shift I had never felt so deserving; made this from Jeffrey Morgenthaler, substituting Punt e Mes for the Vergano Americano.

 

Beauty Beneath

2 oz Appleton Estate V/X
1 oz Vergano Americano
½ oz Cointreau
1 dash Fee’s Old-Fashioned bitters

 

Stir; orange peel twist.

 

002 (480x640).jpg

 

Bitter, bracing, ambrosial. God drinking is nice.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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