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Ann_T

Breakfast! 2014

572 posts in this topic

Ann_T - You have "breakfast of champions"!


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Playing around with bacon!

 

Bacon basket cooked in the oven

 

BaconBasket0590.jpg

 

Double bacon basket filled with scrambled eggs with mushrooms, jalapeno pepper, bell pepper - for hubby

 

BaconBasket&Eggs0585.jpg

 

My breakfast: scrambled eggs, chopped fennel fronds, crumbled feta cheese

 

_FetaFennelScrambled Eggs0583.jpg

 

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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This morning I made coarse stone ground yellow grits with a runny fried egg on top. I love these grits. They taste like eating yellow corn on the cob.

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Took the leftover grits and cut into planks and fried them. Topped with fried quail eggs.

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@Ann_T this was my breakfast this morning hahaha! I just add a bit of cayenne pepper over eggs and a bit of cheese.

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"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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Early breakfast today:

Beef shin stew.

 

Olive oil, lightly crushed garlic, beef shins cut into rounds, sea salt, sauté; water, simmer; two cinnamon sticks, handful of cloves, simmer; cut-up potatoes, simmer; carrots & onions, simmer.

 

DSCN1160a_800.jpg

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Cornsilog.

 

2014-04-10%2014.45.19.jpg

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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Mabuhay, Sydney.


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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image.jpg

Part science experiment part breakfast. I wanted to find out if steaming rather than boiling eggs would lead to easier peeling. These were steamed for 15 minutes. The shell practically fell off. However, they are a little too well done for my taste. Next time I will try 10 minutes.

Steamed asparagus, steamed eggs, Parmesan shavings and a sprinkling of sel gris.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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AnnaN:  very dcarch-y

 

:biggrin:

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attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Part science experiment part breakfast. I wanted to find out if steaming rather than boiling eggs would lead to easier peeling. These were steamed for 15 minutes. The shell practically fell off. However, they are a little too well done for my taste. Next time I will try 10 minutes.

Steamed asparagus, steamed eggs, Parmesan shavings and a sprinkling of sel gris.

 

 

Interesting.  Were these "farm-fresh" eggs (at most a week old), or eggs from the supermarket (i.e. much older than a week or so)?  In my hands I found that "farm-fresh" eggs didn't really peel that much more easily when steamed compared with when boiled in the usual manner (with cold water shocking).  Then again, "aged" supermarket eggs usually peeled OK when boiled, the better the older they were - as has been commented on in many places, I think.

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Interesting.  Were these "farm-fresh" eggs (at most a week old), or eggs from the supermarket (i.e. much older than a week or so)?  In my hands I found that "farm-fresh" eggs didn't really peel that much more easily when steamed compared with when boiled in the usual manner (with cold water shocking).  Then again, "aged" supermarket eggs usually peeled OK when boiled, the better the older they were - as has been commented on in many places, I think.

I've been doing similar tests, provoked in part by utter failure at peeling "old" supermarket eggs that had been boiled, regardless of the treatment (cold water dunk afterward, or not, and so on). The first few dozen steamed eggs had me convinced it was a failsafe method for fresh or supermarket eggs, and then we started seeing some steamed eggs that still didn't peel easily. Without having kept careful records, I'd say our success rate for steamed eggs is somewhere in the 80 - 90% range, better than with boiled eggs. We still need to do a more careful study in our household.

Anna, I've found 5 minutes of active steaming to be adequate to fully cook the eggs; granted, I usually turn the flame off and leave the eggs in the steamer basket until they're cool enough to handle.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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very interesting work.

 

do you start w 1) full steam going   2) eggs from the refrig ?

 

do you poke a pin whole in the flatter end of the egg ?  ( the air sac )

 

many thanks both of you for sharing.

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I'll try to answer everyone's questions in one post.

The eggs were from the supermarket. They are labeled organic. I have no way of knowing for sure how old they are. Judging by the viscosity of the whites and the perkiness of the yoke I would say they are not old. I did not put a hole in them. I did dip them briefly into hot water after I took them out of the fridge. Probably 15 seconds.

This is the steamer set up I used. A stainless petal basket in a pan with an Ikea one-size-fits-all lid. My heat source is induction.

image.jpg

I brought the water to a boil, reduced it to a strong simmer and cooked the eggs for fifteen minutes. I put the pan with its basket of eggs in the sink and ran cold water over rhem for 5-10 mins (I didn't time it). My aim was for hard cooked eggs and 15 mins was obviously too long.

Soon I'll be able to submit a full lab report just like I did in grammar school!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna 12 min is a good target for hard boiled eggs when steaming. I often go for 10 min which is just at the edge of hard boiled

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Anna 12 min is a good target for hard boiled eggs when steaming. I often go for 10 min which is just at the edge of hard boiled

Thanks. I'll be repeating the experiment very soon.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I'd be wary of expecting a universal time for steaming eggs.  Apart from the same variables you have for boiling them - not least age and size of the egg - unlike boiling water, steam doesn't have a set temperature.  It will depend on the height of the heat and how well the lid seals, as well as ambient temperature and the size of the pan and...


Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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I envy you those ramps, Soba.  They'll be coming up in our woods soon, if the snow ever melts, but I haven't seen them in any stores we've visited.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/green-eggs-and-ham

 

I made the recipe from the above link. I omitted the fried ham strands, mostly because I had done it before with beef and it is very time consuming. 

 

I used a chicken egg instead of a duck egg (didn't have any in the fridge at the time), and took the additional step to poach the egg after sous vide per serious eats, I like the somewhat firmer white while retaining the perfectly gooey yolk.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/10/sous-vide-soft-poached-eggs.html

 

 

The dish is obviously made for visual stimulation, and it delivers. What surprised me most was the taste of pea puree with eggs. Delicious!

 

I used the leftover puree a few days later. Scrambled eggs a la Gordon Ramsey on toast with hot sauce, then a coating of pea puree over the eggs. I thought the puree would make the whole dish taste like peas, but it actually loses its potency with other foods, or at least with eggs and ham in this case. 

 

I liked it so much, I'm going to have to play around with the puree and see what other foods it goes well with. Having the rather unique turtle-ninja-ooze appearance is just a bonus. 

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Thanks Smithy. The ramps are from Eataly. USGM won't have those available for maybe 1-2 more weeks. It's been a long winter.

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Carrots and salsify, with garlic and saffron

Peel and trim salsify, cut into batons, place in a bowl of acidulated water (1 cup water, juice of half a lemon). Peel and trim carrots, cut into batons. Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil, add carrots and salsify; cook until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 10 minutes. Drain with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl.

Melt unsalted butter in a skillet, add chopped garlic. Fry until garlic turns a pale gold, add carrots, salsify and a pinch of saffron. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, or until the vegetables are golden brown, about 6-8 minutes. Stir in chopped parsley. Taste for salt and pepper, then serve.

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Omelette aux fines herbes, sautéed spinach with shallots and sesame oil.

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