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liuzhou

Dinner! 2014 (Part 1)

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One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours.

The ribs themselves were pretty good. Maybe the Portuguese stuff is a different product from what I got--like what polenta is to grits or sadza--but I reckon it worked. Might even up the quantity of harrisa next time. And hit them with some minced parsley at the last minute. The ribs, tho', were winners. The potatoes not so much. I reckon next time I'd ignore the recipe and boil them and basically just make roast potatoes underneath the ribs. Too, the pork I used was pretty lean. I'd be inclined to use a bit of rendered bacon fat or some plain old lard next time. Just to help the tatters along.

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Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)
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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours.

The ribs themselves were pretty good. Maybe the Portuguese stuff is a different product from what I got--like what polenta is to grits or sadza--but I reckon it worked. Might even up the quantity of harrisa next time. And hit them with some minced parsley at the last minute. The ribs, tho', were winners. The potatoes not so much. I reckon next time I'd ignore the recipe and boil them and basically just make roast potatoes underneath the ribs. Too, the pork I used was pretty lean. I'd be inclined to use a bit of rendered bacon fat or some plain old lard next time. Just to help the tatters along.

DSC_0012_zps448cf353.jpg

I saw that recipe and thought about using if I can get my hands on some decent ribs.

It's wonton noodle for tonight. Not my usual filling - used chicken, prawns and shitake this time.

wonton.jpg

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I used plain old every day ribs and it worked fine. I reckoned if you got some of those meaty ones from Costco you'd really be in business. Still, if you can only get the ones butchers primarily sell for soup-related tasks, I reckon they'll do just fine. And I don't use those at all for barbecue.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours.

The ribs sound great, but using that much of the portugese pepper paste does sound like it could end up damn salty. When I'm in new bedford, MA, I usually buy some of the pepper paste and piri piri sauce. They're both fantastic, with a nice slightly fermented flavor. The pepper paste is too salty to just use as a condiment, while the piri piri is a little more manageable (but still easily the saltiest hot sauce I have).

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French Onion Soup and Avocado Souffle.

I've never made a souffle before, let alone an Avocado souffle, and I made this in a toaster oven so I was happy with the results. Can't wait to do it again though. Really enjoyed it. Apologize for the crap pictures. Took them right out of the oven on my counter next to my dish drainer.

Edit: no idea why they got rotated. Oh well.

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Edited by Robenco15 (log)
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It was a hot start to a very hot week today. I had no desire to cook inside.

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Satay chicken as per the recipe in Cradle of Flavour. Accompanied by the recommended sweet and sour sauce (basically a 4:1 combination of kecap manis and lime juice sexed up with some sliced chilli) and the papaya/mango/bean/chilli/cucumber/etc salad from Zak Pelaccio's Eat With Your Hands.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Franci - tell me more about the cippolini? Cooked in balsamic somehow?

Not this time. Lazy me, I pressure cooked them. Very little water, extra virgin olive oil, butter, salt, little sugar, I cooked for maybe 3 minutes, deglazed with a drop of stock (the sugar caramelized just the right amount-lucky me didn't burn).

But I usually I do two ways.

1. classic: cipolline, oil, salt and sugar, just enough water, parchment paper hat, when they are cooked just right for me, I remove the hat, let caramelize and deglaze with very little balsamic (or water or stock)

2. my mom's way: saute' in a pan with some oil, when they get a nice color, deglaze with some white wine, salt pepper, a little bit of hot water with a tiny tiny squeeze of tomato concentrate and they go in the oven (375 F) uncovered until they are glossy and tender, about 30-40 minutes, basting them once in a while.


Edited by Franci (log)
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Last night's dinner was my first attempt at the Maximum Flavor beef short ribs (3.5 hours at 250 F). A friend had stressed they were amazing. He was right. Served up with a popover and some sauteed kale and yellow rice. The beef was obviously the main focus. Pretty sure I will never do 72 hour sous vide short ribs again after this recipe. Salty, smokey and so easy that it was almost a crime.

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BTW U.P.: in the SteamBoy?

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No, done in the oven -- next time I will try them in the steam oven.

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Today it was 43 degrees. Celsius. This is not at all a pleasant time to be piss farting around in a kitchen. Enter salad Nicoise. It's a bit snobby to make it with fresh tuna--I usually used the canned stuff--but there you have it.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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image.jpg

Parmesan Crusted Chicken Breast with Garlic Sauce - I added a bit of panko to the parmesan breading this time and really like the added crunch. The garlic sauce may be my favorite part - heavy cream, butter, parmesan and granulated garlic. Forgot to take a photo of the salad that accompanied the chicken.

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Monday late dinner:

• Bone-in chicken thighs braised w/ garlic (about 2 heads worth), shallots, and a very good heavy pour of ryori-shu. No further salting needed, the salt already present in the cooking sake was enough after everything was reduced down. (Chicken thighs browned in olive oil (flavored w/ 1 garlic clove), removed & reserved, the rest of the garlic lightly browned, the chicken plus halved shallots added back in &etc) Eaten w/ mee sua (麵線; min6 sin3) [a Taiwanese brand; Hung-Ming; hand-made].

• Romaine lettuce, blanched in oiled hot water; drizzled w/ oyster sauce & dusted w/ ground white pepper.

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Beef short ribs as per the Amazing Ribs recipe. Used the suggested rub and took them to the suggested temperature of 80C. No sauce. Served them with coleslaw and a store-bought garlic bread. The ribs were quite fatty but I was happy to buy them like that. Mostly, the butchers around here cut them small and thin and trim all the fat because the assumption is you're braising them.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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image.jpg

Very simple dinner. Two tiny lamb chops and a roasted sweet potato.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I had some chicken in the freezer that was left over from making gumbo recently. I decided to make chicken pot pie by using up other left-overs as well. I ran into a few problems. I was half way through it when I discovered there was no milk or cream so I made a gravy with chicken broth and part of a jar of Alfredo sauce. I had a little left over broth and pie dough so I made noodle soup for lunch with those. I couldn't find the rolling pin to roll out the dough so I used an Olive oil bottle shaped like a wine bottle. I rolled out the dough and was surprised that it turned out round instead of looking like Texas. I buttered it and folded it over, buttered the half and folded it again and rolled it out again. Repeated the process in hopes of making the crust flaky. It was... sort of.

Noodle soup with pie dough noodles for lunch

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Chicken pot pie

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and a little salad.

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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I personally don't use a 'rolling pin'

I might have some somewhere, but I do have a 'few' lower end TJ's 'Bordeaux-like' bottles 'around'

they work fine. until the next recycling day.

they also work well for pounding carefully flattening various meat products: Ck Breasts etc.

the Pot Pie looks delicious, BTW

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Long time, no post, so there is no way I am going to catch up on complimenting all of the lovely meals posted since my last visit.

Vietnamese caramel pork with jasmine rice. It is easy to make a quick dinner when caramel sauce is at hand. Boys said they were hungry so I supplemented with ground turkey and chopped red bell peppers and Poblano chiles. We had our usual un-pictured salad to go with.

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For dessert, Brooklyn Brewery Black Chocolate Stout. If it says “chocolate” it must be dessert, right? It is a shame that this nectar is only available seasonally.

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Bruce, interesting beer, do you like it? I love the photo.

Some recent meals

Black Sea bass, collards and some fried king oyster mushrooms

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Yesterday dinner, just me and the kids, so lazy 15 minutes dinner. Chicken breast and shiitake

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Tonight I made some steamed buns and some soup, Swiss chards and leftovers

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Bruce, interesting beer, do you like it? I love the photo.

Thank you, Franci. I love that black chocolate stout, but I'm a sucker for a good, rich, dark beer.

By the way, I like your "lazy" meals better than mine.

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Beef spezzatino, grilled polenta and salad..

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"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Another day of terrible weather (44C), another dinner cooked mostly on the grill. Had to use gas today. Total fire ban. No solid fuel allowed.

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Grilled garfish. Light dry rub of salt, pepper, garlic powder, parsley and thyme. Grilled for about 3 minutes on each side and then hit with a bit of octo vin. Served with some (par-boiled) grilled potatoes and a tomato salad (tomatoes, bocconcini, red onion w/ a balsamic/ev olive oil/shallot/black pepper dressing).

The fish was nice but suffered from the problem associated with most small fish: so many goddamned bones. I didn't have the ninja skills (or, really, desire considering how hot the kitchen was today) to painstakingly remove the five million rib bones (per side/per fish) prior to cooking them.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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