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Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 9)


Rahxephon1
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Ok, here are my results for anyone who cares. The 72 short ribs smelled like someone had sealed a dead rat, some Camembert from 1957, and vinegar soaked aluminum foil. Absolutely foul. I suspect that one was lost. The 48 on the other hand looked beautiful and smelled even better. Regardless, I threw it all away. Already outside...out of sight out of mind. Such a shame....

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Already outside...out of sight out of mind. Such a shame....

Sorry for the loss of the ribs but not sorry your insides won't be gambled with. My wife's comparison is simple: she would rather give birth to 10 babies in a row that ever have serious food poisoning again.

Enjoy your steaks.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

;

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I have yet to find "meaty" S.R.'s, so have not ventured in this area.

AnnaN: of the two so far, which do you prefer?

thanks

So far the 24 hour version. Guess I fall on the steak texture side versus the braise texture. But the final use would also influence me.

I have to try this. My husband LOVE the SR and he goes for a quick cooking rare, medium rare result. And he like the chewy bits a lotver manage to get some to experiment SV, it always gone before I want to attempt. So, I'll try the 24 hours.

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Do you use a rack to keep you SV pouches separated in the bath? So far I have only a 10 L Cambro container that I'm using for SV and I'm thinking of getting a bigger one where I could fit a rack.

Any consideration about sizing?

I only use a rack in my Demi which is non-circulating.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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With good circulation a rack isn't as necessary. Floating is still an issue for me when doing vegetables. Using a Foodsaver not a chamber vac. Air pockets form and it hard to keep the bags submerged. I need a lot of weight to keep them down.

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I use either a 4 position spacer rack or (one or more) wire cooling racks. Even if I'm cooking only one pouch, I'll put a rack at the bottom of the container. Why WOULDN'T I want to facilitate circulation under the package when it's on the bottom of the container? The same goes for multiple packages. I want to promote the flow of the temperature controlled water to all surface areas of the pouch. It's not like it take a whole lot of effort to do so.

Edited by alanz (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

image.jpg

image.jpg

This was a .8 kg Frenched pork loin. I googled recommendations and checked my books for an appropriate time/temp combination. They ranged from 1 1/2 hours to 6 hours most hovering around 80 C. I opted for 4 hours at 80 C. It's an awkward shape to sear in a pan so I did a bit of pan-searing and some torching. I was not especially impressed with the results but suspect that the quality of the meat was more to blame than time or temperature. It was certainly not dry but nor was it very tender. Perfectly edible but not a show case for S-V cooking.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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well ....

loin has very little connective tissue, except on its surface.

consider this cut rare: 130.1 or 55 C

then for time such as Baldwin 3 - 4 hours at 130.

perhaps 2 hrs more as its a 'hunk'

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Hmmm. Lots of advice. Anyone attempted it with good outcome? If so...

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I did really thick loin chops for 3 hours at 60C - then onto the BGE to get that fat nice and crispy - was happy with that.

I did a fresh ham steak that was about 3 inches thick for 8 hours at 64C and was also very happy with it. It's a pretty lean chunk as well with the exception of the fat around it.

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well ....

loin has very little connective tissue, except on its surface.

consider this cut rare: 130.1 or 55 C

then for time such as Baldwin 3 - 4 hours at 130.

perhaps 2 hrs more as its a 'hunk'

I think you will find Baldwin suggests 55C for 4-5 hours or 60C for 3 1/2 - 4 1/2 hours.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Also, because time to temp for sous vide scales to the square of the minimum thickness, in general you want to portion then cook instead of the cook then portion of conventional methods.

And at least for fish, I find that portioning cold portions (either before cooking or after chilling) gives a much cleaner cut.

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correct: loin roast. somewhere there is a thick chop that's not quite a roast. somewhere.

but I like pork as rare as possible. shame 125 is not the pasteur point !

Ive grilled loin so the outside is nicely brown then rest the slice thin for a sandwich and the middle it

as the FR would say 'bleu' if sliced thin the best sandwich ever. 'bleu'

Edited by rotuts (log)
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correct: loin roast. somewhere there is a thick chop that's not quite a roast. somewhere.

but I like pork as rare as possible. shame 125 is not the pasteur point !

Ive grilled loin so the outside is nicely brown then rest the slice thin for a sandwich and the middle it

as the FR would say 'bleu' if sliced thin the best sandwich ever. 'bleu'

To each his own, thank heaven but while I can do beef practically still mooing, my pork had better do no more than blush.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna, I sous vide these two Berkshire loin chops which were one inch thick at 55.6 Cattachicon.gifDSC00301.jpg (132 F) for 2 hours. Gave them a good sear and they were perfectly pink and tender.

Starting with Berkshire pork ought to make a huge difference but perfectly pink is probably not where I like my pork. A hint of pink is beautiful but more than that......and I'll be reaching for the salad.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Starting with Berkshire pork ought to make a huge difference but perfectly pink is probably not where I like my pork. A hint of pink is beautiful but more than that......and I'll be reaching for the salad.

Sorry Anna, perfectly pink for you sounds what it is for me too...it was not extremely pink but just a hint and juicy. I should have been more specific. I will try to remember to take a picture next time.

Edited by heidih
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Starting with Berkshire pork ought to make a huge difference but perfectly pink is probably not where I like my pork. A hint of pink is beautiful but more than that......and I'll be reaching for the salad.

Sorry Anna, perfectly pink for you sounds what it is for me too...it was not extremely pink but just a hint and juicy. I should have been more specific. I will try to remember to take a picture next time.

Sounds alrighty then. Thanks.

Edited by heidih
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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image.jpg

Just churned Douglas Baldwin vanilla ice cream ready to go into the freezer. Don't know why I took so long to make custard sous vide. So easy, so few dishes, so little chance of scrambled eggs.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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