Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 9)


Recommended Posts

[Moderator note: The original Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 8)]

Hello everyone!

This is my first post on the forum though I've been reading a lot. I recently purchased a sous vide demi and I'm experimenting with it a bit. Today I bought a nice 1 inch thick fiorentina which I plan to cook tomorrow. I like my beef rare so I planned to do 3 hours on 50°c. Is my timing for this Ok? I'm not really sure since I tried the tough cuts on 48-72 hours and I liked them, also did some thin steaks (ex. porterhouse) for an hour and a half and they were not bad, but I read here on the forums that for more tender cuts it's not recommendable to cook them for too long, but I'm not sure what is best for an inch thick.

Tnx a lot for your help will post some photos when lunch will be ready :)

Edited by Mjx
Moderator note added. (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone!

This is my first post on the forum though I've been reading a lot. I recently purchased a sous vide demi and I'm experimenting with it a bit. Today I bought a nice 1 inch thick fiorentina which I plan to cook tomorrow. I like my beef rare so I planned to do 3 hours on 50°c. Is my timing for this Ok? I'm not really sure since I tried the tough cuts on 48-72 hours and I liked them, also did some thin steaks (ex. porterhouse) for an hour and a half and they were not bad, but I read here on the forums that for more tender cuts it's not recommendable to cook them for too long, but I'm not sure what is best for an inch thick.

Tnx a lot for your help will post some photos when lunch will be ready :)

Hi Rahxephon1, welcome to the sous vide community!

See Doctor* Douglas Baldwin's table 2.2 -> 1¼ hr should do; in my experience cuts with bone on may take some additional time to be cooked near the bone, so maybe you plan 2 hrs. For beef, an additional hour or two for logistical reasons won't harm, but longer cooking times may lead to more loss of juice.

* As of 9 May 2013 -> Congratulations to Douglas! :smile:

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, thanks to a friend, my home made sous vide rig is finally finished - In Germany I was unable to find a home use one, only professional units that were too expensive.

First try - like most people I expect - was eggs this morning.

A disaster!

I did not calibrate it, but even so I wasn't expecting this result...

I set it to 63C for 50 min (Cooking for geeks suggests this for soft boiled), and was expecting whites to be set, and the yellow still runny.

Opened them up and it was the opposite! The yellows had set (semi-hard, it held its shape and was not at all liquidy) and the whites where a wet pool around it.

I thought the whites set at a lower temp than the yellow - so how can this have happened? If both had set it would have been better.

On top of that, I now know that the PID that I bought is accurate to 0.1C, but can only be set to 1C.

Edited by jjahorn (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's basically what happens. The yolk goes like custard. The white is semi set. This is how a number of chefs, including Rene Redzepi at Noma separate out the egg yolks for their dishes. They wash away the white.

At this point, I crack the eggs onto a plate and brush away the loose white. you'll know it when you see it. I then put the eggs into simmering water to harden the whites. It gives a fantastic egg-shaped poached egg.

  • Like 1

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, thanks to a friend, my home made sous vide rig is finally finished - In Germany I was unable to find a home use one, only professional units that were too expensive.

First try - like most people I expect - was eggs this morning.

A disaster!

I did not calibrate it, but even so I wasn't expecting this result...

I set it to 63C for 50 min (Cooking for geeks suggests this for soft boiled), and was expecting whites to be set, and the yellow still runny.

Opened them up and it was the opposite! The yellows had set (semi-hard, it held its shape and was not at all liquidy) and the whites where a wet pool around it.

I thought the whites set at a lower temp than the yellow - so how can this have happened? If both had set it would have been better.

On top of that, I now know that the PID that I bought is accurate to 0.1C, but can only be set to 1C.

Whites set at a higher temp than yolks. Runny whites are standard in these low temp eggs. Many of us don't like them like that, so we fully cold the egg in cold water, then dunk in boiling water for 2/3 minutes, which doesn't affect the yolk much but sets the whites. There is also a fast method intended to obtain similar results using 72-75C water and about 15 minutes. There's a whole thread devoted to sous-vide eggs, have a look at that discussion.

You didn't mention the size of your eggs. Yolks of XL eggs should not get hard in 50 min in 63C water, but M-sized eggs in a slightly miscalibrated bath may do (time and egg size do matter, even though it was said for a while they didn't).

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are two topics on "SV" egg cookery:
All about "sous-vide" eggs
and
Still looking for SV Eggs with whites set. My tests with pics
You also find some info "in a nutshell" on wikiGullet.
See also Doctor Douglas Baldwin's table In-Shell Egg Heating Times in a 75°C Water Bath Using Circumference or Diameter.
For "perfect" poached eggs see e.g. Comparing 16'/75°C eggs and 50'/64°C+3'/100°C eggs.

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

Link to post
Share on other sites

. . . .

On top of that, I now know that the PID that I bought is accurate to 0.1C, but can only be set to 1C.

What model of PID controller did you buy? Maybe you can select 1° resolution or 0.1° resolution in a parameter menu? If not, you might change to Fahrenheit so you can set in 0.5°C intervals.

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

Link to post
Share on other sites

. . . .

On top of that, I now know that the PID that I bought is accurate to 0.1C, but can only be set to 1C.

What model of PID controller did you buy? Maybe you can select 1° resolution or 0.1° resolution in a parameter menu? If not, you might change to Fahrenheit so you can set in 0.5°C intervals.

The type of thermocouple is also important. Most PID's will only control to .1 degrees if you use a platinum probe PT100 type. You have to set the thermocouple type in the PID setup.

Edited by paulpegg (log)

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

Link to post
Share on other sites

A question about shelf life. I am following the 'turkey wing' recipe from Modernist Cuisine. I sealed the wings with salt and sugar for 24 hours. Then, this morning, I took them out of the bath after a 12 hour overnight cook. I have not opened the bags. They are still sealed. The vacuum? Well, I don't think it was a 100% vacuum: I'm using an entry-level strip sealer, after all. I put them in the fridge straight away. No muckin about. Anyway, I'm not able to give them the final sear tomorrow. Instead they'll be sitting in the bags for another evening (making it a total of two days from sous vide to sear/service). I assume they'll be okay, right? In terms of food safety and all. I'm a little paranoid.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris, I have down a variation on this recipe and left the wings in the fridge for about 10 days without an issue. I must add that I have a chamber sealer.

I have personally never had an issue with LTLT sous vide cooked meats if stored in a good fridge for up to 2 weeks. YMMV.

Simon

Link to post
Share on other sites

A question about shelf life. I am following the 'turkey wing' recipe from Modernist Cuisine. I sealed the wings with salt and sugar for 24 hours. Then, this morning, I took them out of the bath after a 12 hour overnight cook. I have not opened the bags. They are still sealed. The vacuum? Well, I don't think it was a 100% vacuum: I'm using an entry-level strip sealer, after all. I put them in the fridge straight away. No muckin about. Anyway, I'm not able to give them the final sear tomorrow. Instead they'll be sitting in the bags for another evening (making it a total of two days from sous vide to sear/service). I assume they'll be okay, right? In terms of food safety and all. I'm a little paranoid.

You have completely pasteurized the wings with that time/temperature profile, then chilled them fast. Plus you will sear them before eating, which will practically sterilize the surface (be sure to cover all the surface). They should be really safe for at least one week in a <5ºC fridge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What model of PID controller did you buy? Maybe you can select 1° resolution or 0.1° resolution in a parameter menu? If not, you might change to Fahrenheit so you can set in 0.5°C intervals.

The type of thermocouple is also important. Most PID's will only control to .1 degrees if you use a platinum probe PT100 type. You have to set the thermocouple type in the PID setup.

The PID is from a German company (Pohl) the controller is called A-senco TR11. The technical specs say display resolution 1C, measuring resolution 0.1C.

I have parameters for Hysteria, P,I,D, relay time, Temp calibration, and Autotuning. No values for Fahrenheit or resolution ;-(

I'm going to send an email to the company, but expect that it is not possible to fine-tune.

As for the probe - it is a PT100, but I think it is steel. After some research it looks like this type of sensor has an accuracy of 0,3K at 0C

Well, My set-up will get me started in the would of sous vide, and I will replace the controller when I find it is limiting me.

Wish me luck everyone!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume 12 hours/58C, which came from Modernist Cuisine, would be enough to pastuerise the meat.

In fact about 2 hours should be enough. Realize, though, that pasteurization reduces vegetative forms of pathogens to safe levels, but not some spores or toxins. Fast chilling, low enough fridge temperature, limiting conservation time (one week at <5ºC should be Ok) and (optionally) searing all surface before consuming take care of that part.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pork ribs are on sale for a week, 1.79/lbs. Id like to try a combo SV/BBQ technique.

Ive done these ribs in the past just BBQ for 6 hrs or so, but would like to try something new.

after removing the inner membrane Ill season with some sort of dry rub w/o salt and SV

what temps and times are recommended for this stage? then Ill finish with smoke for an hour or so on the BBQ and add salt then.

many thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've thought of doing the same, so I'll look forward to your report.

My usual smoking technique is to use the BRITU rub (Google it for the recipe, although I omit the MSG) and smoke at 225F until the interior temp clears 140 for at least 35min. That's usually about 6 hours.

My plan had been to use the BRITU rub, add a little liquid smoke, and to SV for at least 12-24 hours at 140, to give time for the connective tissue to break down, then finish on a moderately hot grill for char (500F or so). I don't expect smoking to help much as a finish due to low temps and the fact that the meat would already be cooked, although it's possible that hitting it with a heavy smoke would work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I've ordered & received some short ribs from Lafrieda http://lafrieda.com . Can I sous vide them in them in the vacuum packaging that they came in? I'll remove the stick-on label.

Bill

Wow, at that price I would want to do the best job possible. You would probably want to add some marinade to them (or at least salt and pepper) so take them out of the bags and start fresh. I usually do Momofuku 48 hour ribs which have a really great marinade in the bag.

  • Like 1

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I'm after opinions on a food safety matter.

I was cooking some chicken sous vide @ 58C, it was in the bath for about 1 1/2 hours, maybe more, when I turned it off but forgot to remove the bag. The chicken stayed in the bath as it cooled down and then stayed at room temperature for another 6 hours before I realised it was there and popped the bag in the freezer.

Based on the size of the bag (small) it should easily have been pasteurised before the bath was turned off. I'm curious to know what safety issues there may be with the chicken, if any. I have no problem throwing out a small bag of chicken if there's any doubt but just wondering what other people think?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pork ribs are on sale for a week, 1.79/lbs. Id like to try a combo SV/BBQ technique.

Ive done these ribs in the past just BBQ for 6 hrs or so, but would like to try something new.

after removing the inner membrane Ill season with some sort of dry rub w/o salt and SV

what temps and times are recommended for this stage? then Ill finish with smoke for an hour or so on the BBQ and add salt then.

many thanks!

rotuts, with pork and chicken, a few hours in a 4% salt water brine does wonders with the sous vide method. Generally people say not to salt meats like beef since the salt draws juices out of it. But people dont normally brine beef, and when you brine pork or chicken its does the opposite and retains the juices. If you worried about being salty, 4% is on the lower side of most brines, but if your concerned, just rinse the ribs off good after you remove them from the brine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By swpeterson
      I have been buying country style bone-in ribs instead of bone-in pork chops. I season them with a rub very similar to Emeril's Rustic Rub spice rub and use a heaping tablespoon a rendered Nueskie's Applewood smoked bacon fat in the Food Saver vacumn bag. We have been using 2 ribs in the bag but have made the decision to switch to one to split. The meat is so rich and flavorful that we can easily split one and enjoy the meal even more.
      For a sauce, I cobbled together a sauce made with the juice of half a valencia orange, the pulp from 1 passion fruit, 1 cup pitted cherries (I used rainiers and bings in this one), 1 tsp Dijon mustard, 1/2 cup white wine, juice from 1 lime, 2 tsp honey, garlic cloves crushed (I used roasted garlic that I keep in the fridge and 'crushed' them in my 'special' coffee grinder(2)) and 1 medium sized shallot. I used the same bacon fat to soften the shallots, then added the rest of the ingredients and let it reduce by about a third and then let it rest and reheated it when the pork ribs were done.
      I kept them in the sous vide at 141 from 10:00 AM until I got home from work at 7:00. It took another half hour +/- to change clothes, pour a glass of wine, reheat the sauce, make a salad, and heat up the garlic bread that I keep prepped in the freezer. After the bread was heated for about 8 minutes, I switched the oven to broil and took the bread out of the oven.
      I have started to experiment with using the broiler element to put color on the proteins that I have cooked in the sous vide. I have placed the oven rack on the third rack from the top, leave the door ajar while I bring the broiler element up to heat. I use my 10" stainless steel saute pan with a stainless steel rack in the pan for the protein. I open the sous vide package and pour the liquid that has accumulated in the bag into the bottom of the pan. I put the ribs, fattest side up on the rack and place the pan in the oven. I leave the door ajar and let them stay in there for 8 mnutes.
      That timing has worked extremely well for both the ribs and the chicken that I have done. I don't flip them yet and that hasn't been necessary for those 2 proteins. (I was much less successful with this formula for the flank steak which I think needs to be closer the heat source for less time).
      At any rate, the broiler is working well for color and the meat and sauce are great. The sauce also works very well with chicken. Haven't tried it yet with the salmon.
      Just wanted to share as I really love this sous vide thing and wanted to share.
      Sorry no photos yet. I haven't figured that part out yet but my husband promises to teach me.
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...