Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)


Pontormo
 Share

Recommended Posts

55 minutes ago, SLB said:

I don't know if this query is absurdly, stupidly basic; but I am embarrassed about the lapse which is reflected in my having to ask.

 

How long can I keep un-rendered beef fat (suet) in the refrigerator.  It was previously frozen, but I did not have room to put it into my freezer with the actual beef.  I haven't gotten around to dealing with the rendering, and it's been exactly two weeks. 

 

Toss??? 

 

I'd keep it.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I was assuming that un-rendered fat would operate more like meat than like fat:  while rancidity is a potential, there are in addition a whole host of other problematic potentials, too.  

 

It's comforting to hear folks affirming the idea that it might be just fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, SLB said:

I guess I was assuming that un-rendered fat would operate more like meat than like fat:  while rancidity is a potential, there are in addition a whole host of other problematic potentials, too.  

 

It's comforting to hear folks affirming the idea that it might be just fine.

 

Though you might want to render it soon.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know.  I know.  I just . . . I have, atypically, just not been up for grease everywhere right now.  

 

It's chilly right this second tho (we're not far from each other, I assume it's chilly for you too).  I really better deal with this before the temperature jumps back up.  

 

Sigh.  Tomorrow.  Tomorrow morning.  It's gonna be Sunday church of tallow up in here.  

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, SLB said:

I know.  I know.  I just . . . I have, atypically, just not been up for grease everywhere right now.  

 

It's chilly right this second tho (we're not far from each other, I assume it's chilly for you too).  I really better deal with this before the temperature jumps back up.  

 

Sigh.  Tomorrow.  Tomorrow morning.  It's gonna be Sunday church of tallow up in here.  

 

It's not chilly, it's cold.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sitting here in a hoodie, a fleece, and a down vest.  I am generally confused -- last weekend I was so hot I was researching Biden on climate change -- and now am thinking, maybe I just need to go to bed.  

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, SLB said:

I'm sitting here in a hoodie, a fleece, and a down vest.  I am generally confused -- last weekend I was so hot I was researching Biden on climate change -- and now am thinking, maybe I just need to go to bed.  

 

Yesterday morning I had the air conditioning on.  Now I can't get warm.  Rum helps.

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Rule #1: smell it.    Rancid fats have a noticeably off scent.

 

 

Smell tests for problems with food are dangerously unreliable.

 

Quote

Most bacteria that cause infection or illness don't omit an odour, so sniffing will do little other than let you know if a food is getting old.

.

https://coach.nine.com.au/diet/smell-of-spoiled-food-not-a-sign-of-danger/b4b7ab32-966a-4fda-8d1e-da4930065564

 

You may be able to detect rancidity by smell, but there are a host of pathogens which have no scent. E. Coli for example.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Smell tests for problems with food are dangerously unreliable.

So true, botulism, for example doesn't always smell. The best rule is, when in doubt, pitch it out! The cost of that beef fat will never outweigh the cost of a Hospital stay or a casket. I just went through a very light case of food poisoning and take my word for it, it ain't no fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

 

Smell tests for problems with food are dangerously unreliable.

 

 

You may be able to detect rancidity by smell, but there are a host of pathogens which have no scent. E. Coli for example.

 

 

1 hour ago, Tropicalsenior said:

So true, botulism, for example doesn't always smell. The best rule is, when in doubt, pitch it out! The cost of that beef fat will never outweigh the cost of a Hospital stay or a casket. I just went through a very light case of food poisoning and take my word for it, it ain't no fun!

WORD!

  • Thanks 1

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had the misfortune of having had food poisoning twice.  I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy.  Both times the food tasted great.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

So true, botulism, for example doesn't always smell. The best rule is, when in doubt, pitch it out! The cost of that beef fat will never outweigh the cost of a Hospital stay or a casket. I just went through a very light case of food poisoning and take my word for it, it ain't no fun!

So true!  My one and only case (brought about by fresh spinach) turned into pneumonia and kept me in hospital for two days.

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's fat that is going to be rendered, it will eventually get hot enough to kill off any potential nasties (or their toxins, in the case of botulism). Especially if you render it in a pressure cooker. But even if you don't, you can always bring the rendered fat up to 300F for a few minutes and hold it there when you're done. Ain't nothin' gonna survive that kind of treatment.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/21/2006 at 5:49 PM, azureus said:

 The best are made with buttermilk, but I rarely have that in my fridge.

April

 

Can thinned yoghurt be used as a buttermilk substitute?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Susanwusan said:

 

Can thinned yoghurt be used as a buttermilk substitute?

 

 

No. But to make buttermilk, just squeeze some lemon juice into some fresh milk and 15 minutes later you have buttermilk.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Susanwusan said:

 

Can thinned yoghurt be used as a buttermilk substitute?

 

2 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I actually use them interchangeably in a lot of recipes.

 

Agree, @Kerry Beal! My sub is plain kefir, and I also keep buttermilk powder on hand - it thickens ranch dressing nicely!

  • Like 3

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually have buttermilk culture so for the few things that demand only that - I’ll make it. But requires lead time and I tend to be a bit impulsive when I cook/bake.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

I actually use them interchangeably in a lot of recipes.

 

While I agree they can be used interchangeably, I can taste the difference. Often, it doesn't matter, but sometimes it does more so.

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

While I agree they can be used interchangeably, I can taste the difference. Often, it doesn't matter, but sometimes it does more so.

For sure - but in baking I can’t taste the difference - I’m using it for the tenderness and such. 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

For sure - but in baking I can’t taste the difference - I’m using it for the tenderness and such. 

 

I never bake anything but bread.  I only use buttermilk in my favourite soda bread recipe.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 2

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

I never bake anything but bread.  I only use buttermilk in my favourite soda bread recipe.

I believe that soda bread might’ve been the Reason I needed to buy the culture

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use buttermilk for scones.  When I buy a quart, I use 1 cup in the recipes I make, and freeze the rest in baggies in one cup portions.  The only thing I do when I thaw a cup is to blend the buttermilk well as freezing tends to separate it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...