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Pontormo

Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)

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I'm guessing if the milk were really burnt you wouldn't like it.  Nor would Migoya.

 

Disclaimer, I've read the book but don't recall the recipe.  Is it like dulce de leche?

 

 

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Disclaimer, I've read the book but don't recall the recipe.  Is it like dulce de leche?

 

 

Don't think so. The full recipe calls for 4.5 kg of milk, cook to some degree of browning on the bottom of the pot, reserve 3.5 kg.  Obviously some water will boil off but the milk is still the main liquid in the gelato.

 

edited to add - @Tri2Cook, do you remember making the burnt milk gelato recipe?

 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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7 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

@Tri2Cook, do you remember making the burnt milk gelato recipe?


I did make it. I was surprised at how good it is. Amazingly good, in a simple kind of way... but the burning-of-the-milk part takes a long time. Fortunately, it doesn't require a lot of attention during that time. And I took him at his word in regards to getting those solid on the bottom of the pot burnt. They were black. You don't want to scrape the bottom during the process or when pouring the milk out of the pot. It infuses the flavor into the milk and you get it more as a nice toasty note than hardcore burnt. That's it on the left (the other is the roasted black mission fig gelato, very tasty as well)…

gelati.jpg

 

7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Is some degree of browning really burnt?

 


Nope. But the milk solids that sink to the bottom of the pot in this recipe should be actually burnt... or very, very dark if you prefer to word it that way. I enjoyed the result quite a lot but I also said a lot of bad words while scrubbing the pot. Should have done it at work so I could have just tossed the pot to the dishwasher section. :P

 

8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I'm guessing if the milk were really burnt you wouldn't like it.  Nor would Migoya.


You would be incorrect. It does actually get burnt on the bottom of the pot and the result is very nice. Comes through as a nice deep toasty note rather than tasting like something burnt. I had the same worries when I decided to make it. The worry was needless, Mr. Migoya was spot on about it.

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and now burnt salt is a thing (see Serious Eats)

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52 minutes ago, heidih said:

and now burnt salt is a thing (see Serious Eats)

 

April Fools!

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@pastrygirl I was responding in a semi-hurry earlier, was getting ready to head to work. There was one thing I did different from the recipe, I added a dose of non-fat dry milk powder to the milk while it was cooking to increase the amount of solids settling on the bottom of the pot getting toasty. I was following the Ideas In Food blog's work with brown butter solids at that time where they were adding milk powder to the butter they were browning to get a nice yield of toasty, buttery solids to play with. it seemed like it would transfer well to this ice cream recipe. Seemed to me, if the whole idea is to get flavor from burnt milk solids, then more solids couldn't be a bad thing. Most of it stays burnt on the bottom of the pot so it's not going to drastically increase the overall solids in the end result. Whether or not it actually helped anything, I don't know.

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@Tri2Cook thanks!  And just a regular pot on high heat? 

 

Honestly, I was just going to use his ratio and not follow the recipe but the story about the guy in Mexico creating these wonderful and un-intentionally avant garde flavors sold me.  Now I'm on a quest, I'll go to the thrift store and buy a crappy thin pot if it will help 😂

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18 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

@Tri2Cook thanks!  And just a regular pot on high heat? 

 

Honestly, I was just going to use his ratio and not follow the recipe but the story about the guy in Mexico creating these wonderful and un-intentionally avant garde flavors sold me.  Now I'm on a quest, I'll go to the thrift store and buy a crappy thin pot if it will help 😂


I wish I could remember exactly which pot I used but I don't remember picking anything for any special characteristic, it was just something I had handy.

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15 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

 I added a dose of non-fat dry milk powder to the milk while it was cooking to increase the amount of solids settling on the bottom of the pot getting toasty. 

 

I used my reduced milk from yesterday plus more whole milk so there were plenty of solids and boy did they settle and scorch!  

 

0C428CA8-0A81-438F-A877-C5F3D0A0C8D5.thumb.jpeg.3858e3df555bf966ac0144d41c6fa9c0.jpeg

 

I haven’t spun the base yet but it tasted ok. Tonight I rest assured I can still burn things when I want to, but I already doubt this will become a regular flavor due to the pot scrubbing alone. And scorched milk really stunk up the kitchen. I’ll spin it later in the week, I still want to see how the texture is compared to my usual high-fat ice creams. 

 

I think the recipe could be interesting as part of a composed dessert if only I could erase frustrating days at work re-making pastry cream after scorching it. I can’t dissociate the smell of burnt milk from failure.😖😂

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I make caramelized onions. My sister-in-law calls them "burnt onions".:hmmm:

You say potato...xD

 

 

 

 

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