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Pontormo

Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)

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Here's a square one I just now found on ebay - there are also round ones.  

Screen Shot 2017-01-28 at 3.02.18 PM.png


Edited by andiesenji remove picture, wrong one (log)
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If fat is flavor, and a roux has fat in it, why defat the liquid your dish was cooked in before making your sauce?

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I don't think fat = flavor just that it carrries flavor so one tempers the amount to maximuze the effect overall

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I think a roux  ( fat + flour ) is useful as a way of preventing lumping if properly used.

 

you also might want a different fat's flavor profile in you sauce than the fat in the cooked liquid.

 

you also might want to control the total fat in the sauce , which might be easier w a roux

 

but if you are happy with the fat's flavor in you cooking liquid , just use a fine flour when making your sauce

 

ie Wondra.

 

with the Advent of home stick blenders , lumpy sauce / gravy is a think of the past anyway.

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I think I have come to the right place.  I am not very experienced grilling fish fillets.  I can find remarkably little information in my hundreds of books, in the library, or on the web.

 

My question:  if started with the skin side toward the grill, should the fillet be turned to finish cooking with the skin side up?

 

 

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yes.   

 

otherwise , to cook the flesh side up to your liking  ( the ' up- ' side initially )

 

you would over cook the skin side for sure

 

over cooked fish is a tragedy IMO

 

although some fish need to be cooked  ' through '   :   swordfish , SeaBass    i.e. very firm fish

 

others can be very lightly cooked : salmon , tuna  or not cooked at all !

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10 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I think I have come to the right place.  I am not very experienced grilling fish fillets.  I can find remarkably little information in my hundreds of books, in the library, or on the web.

 

My question:  if started with the skin side toward the grill, should the fillet be turned to finish cooking with the skin side up?

 

 

That's how I generally do it. I crisp the skin side, then finish the "presentation" side.

 

If you have a relatively thick piece, and want pretty grill marks, you can grill the presentation side first and then finish it on the skin side. I'm a huge aficionado of well-crisped skin (that's basically *why* I grill the fish) and care not one whit for grill marks, so I don't do it that way. There's a risk of the fillet being overcooked before the skin crisps properly.  YMMV

Do you get fresh mackerel in season on your part of the coast? They're a particular favorite of mine for grilling.

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Posted (edited)

If serving the fish with crispy skin still on, I’d serve it skin side up so the skin stays crispy and doesn’t steam or get wet from sauce.  I like a nice bit of crispy salmon skin but I may be in the minority. 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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Depends on what kind of fish. I cook the  flesh side first.

Some fish fillet will curl up if you crisp the skin first.

 

dcarch

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Thanks, everyone.  I particularly had in mind bluefish but I wanted to know about grilling fish fillets in general.  I should think less oily types of fish would be more difficult to turn.

 

I have another piece of the bluefish that I showed grilled skin side down in the dinner thread the other night:

 

Dinner03092019.png

 

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"red fish, blue fish" - sorry ;)

 

As @pastrygirl notes you want the skin up at serving if you enjoy it. Honestly with thin fish I broil with the rack lower down. Achieves the result I like- moist fish, crispy skin. if that is in your taste equation. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, heidih said:

"red fish, blue fish" - sorry ;)

 

As @pastrygirl notes you want the skin up at serving if you enjoy it. Honestly with thin fish I broil with the rack lower down. Achieves the result I like- moist fish, crispy skin. if that is in your taste equation. 

 

 

 

I work in a library.  Not sure I can forgive you...

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/157787-dinner-2019/?do=findComment&comment=2192921

 

Right now I'm finishing up the last of my white mai tai and a generous peanut course.  Then I'm off to grill the last bit of bluefish before it begins turning on its own.  I plan to start skin down (towards the heat) and flip after about five minutes.  I'm worried that if I start flesh side down the fillet might stick to the rack.  I plan to plate skin side down.  To do otherwise seems just wrong.

 

Or I might start flesh side down and see what happens.  I can't decide but I am running out of peanuts.

 

 

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I started flesh side down.  I am amazed how non stick the Philips seems to be:

 

Dinner03112019.png

 

 

My only complaint is the fish was a little overdone,  Easy enough to fix in the future.

 

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When adding a precise amount of polysorbate 80 to a dish how does one do it?  My best thought so far is to buy a $2000 scale and weigh it into the cooking vessel directly.

 

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5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

When adding a precise amount of polysorbate 80 to a dish how does one do it?  My best thought so far is to buy a $2000 scale and weigh it into the cooking vessel directly.

 

If you have money to burn ... otherwise I’m sure you can find a jeweler’s or postage scale to weigh small amounts for much less.

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@JoNorvelleWalker

 

there are lots of small , portable scales that fit into a pocket on Amazon ;

 

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-AWS-100-Digital-Resolution/dp/B0012LOQUQ?ref_=fsclp_pl_dp_1

 

they measure the weight of small amounts of " powder '

 

I have one I used for a while in measuring the weight of ground coffee for a " shot " of espresso.

 

 

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13 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

When adding a precise amount of polysorbate 80 to a dish how does one do it? 

 

With precision.

🙃

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For lack of more helpful suggestions I added the polysorbate 80 by rinsing the weighing boat in the contents of the pot.

 

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On 3/10/2019 at 11:17 PM, chromedome said:

That's how I generally do it. I crisp the skin side, then finish the "presentation" side.

 

If you have a relatively thick piece, and want pretty grill marks, you can grill the presentation side first and then finish it on the skin side. I'm a huge aficionado of well-crisped skin (that's basically *why* I grill the fish) and care not one whit for grill marks, so I don't do it that way. There's a risk of the fillet being overcooked before the skin crisps properly.  YMMV

Do you get fresh mackerel in season on your part of the coast? They're a particular favorite of mine for grilling.

One of our top seafood restaurants in Australia (and I suspect, the world), Saint Peter, uses a fish weight to enable fish to be cooked with crispy skin without being flipped or finished in the oven. You could always use a steak weight/bacon press/burger press instead to achieve the same effect.

 

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On 3/15/2019 at 6:05 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

For lack of more helpful suggestions I added the polysorbate 80 by rinsing the weighing boat in the contents of the pot.

 

 

Tween 80 is a PITA to work with. I think your solution was a good one. When I worked with it I'd add it to a beaker of liquid sitting on a scale and then just stir it in.

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3 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

Tween 80 is a PITA to work with. I think your solution was a good one. When I worked with it I'd add it to a beaker of liquid sitting on a scale and then just stir it in.

 

My problem exactly, thank you.  Now if I just had that $2000 scale.

 

I do apologize for my short tempered reply to those who misunderstood the question.

 

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