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Chemex Sheets, not for coffee


Robenco15
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Hi All,

So a quick question. I just learned about of Chemex and I see it seems to be a drip method of making coffee.

I don't drink coffee. Probably never will. But I see the guys at chefsteps.com use the sheets to strain product. They always use it with the Chemex glass apparatus (carafe?).

Can I just purchase the filters and then put them in a bowl strainer to strain things or do they need to be used in a very specific way? With the carafe? Do they need to be folded into a conical shape? Thank you!

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As a coffee drinker and home roaster I have multiple methods to brew coffee and still don't see how the Chemex differs from a regular cone pour over drip system. How are their filters different from the standard cone filter???

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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Chemex filters are a circle 11-3/4" in diameter. They come prefolded in a box, usually about twice as expensive as something like a Melitta cone filter. They will fit standard drip coffee makers that use a cone filter but have to be trimmed across the top. They can be used in other pour-over coffee makers that use a cone filter without trimming unless it's a Clever Drip.

When you open the folded filter, there are 3 thicknesses on one side, just one thickness on the other side as it is placed in the carafe. The paper is somewhat thicker than other conical filters which slightly slows the drip through time; they are intended to filter out more of the bitter compounds in coffee and produce a smoother cup. The Chemex method involves wetting the grounds first to 'bloom;' this effectively lengthens the brew-time allowing for slightly more extraction of flavor.

Robenco15 - I don't see any reason they couldn't be used in a bowl strainer except any limitations due to their size but I've never tried it.

Edited by brucesw (log)
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I also roast my own and currently usually make espresso in the AlexiaPID.

some time a go I used Chemex. my father used to visit and break the 'beaker' kept getting a new one until the last one was pressed glass. not really any different but ....

you can make identical coffee w regular melita filters use two and control your grind. I mix the fresh ground in the boiling ( just off the boil from the microwave ) water for 30 sec then pour into the melita filter.

chemex makes great coffee w great ingredients. but so does melita.

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Unbleached cotton muslin.

You can get it at any fabric store in various thicknesses.

It's reusable over and over again....a great bargain!

Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

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I've always used cheesecloth to "strain product." Works especially well in a rounded, or bowl strainer. And - it's washable and reusable.

Yeah I have reusable cloth strainers that I like, was just curious about these chemex filters. thought they did a better, but slower, job of straining things and depending on the application I'd be ok with that.

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I will say that the Chemex filters (or probably any other multi layer paper coffee filter) do deliver an exceptionally clear filtered result. They definitely trap smaller particles than multi-thickness cheesecloth or muslin. But again, I don't think "Chemex" brand matters--three Melitta cone filters, stacked, probably deliver the same results.

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Depending on what you are straining, cheesecloth or muslin may be fine. I have also used coffee filters to strain infused oils - and they work quite well. You can get a melita stile cone very cheap (check garage sales) and they make a good strainer.

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I use paper coffee filters to strain things all the time -- they work very well to make Greek yoghurt. Put a paper filter in a regular kitchen strainer, fill with yoghurt, place over deep bowl, cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight. Next day just pick up the filter and turn over, dumping the now thick yoghurt into a clean bowl. Easy peasy.

I never liked Chemex coffee but do like Melitta -- never could understand why there would be a difference, but there is.

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In the FWIW Department, we have a commercial coffee maker at the Senior Center where I teach http://www.cw-usa.com/equipment-commercial-coffeepotbrewers-bunn-pourover-vps.html?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&cvsfa=3170&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=323833&gclid=CLjN9tClvbsCFYw1QgodLCgANA

I always thought that the filters for these machines http://www.bunn.com/pages/commercl/related/rel_paper_filters.html would be ideal for use in a bowl strainer. I may grab one or two from the center and see just how well they work in my situation. I'd imagine the size of the strainer would be important, and need to fit the filters appropriately.

Did you mention if you had anything specific in mind to filter?

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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Nothing very specific. I use my cloth strainers to further strain stock, make infused oils, and that is all I can think of now. I was just curious about the Chemex. Was wondering if they were something special that I should look at buying.

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FWIW, Robenco15, I find that infusions are best strained with a gold-mesh coffee filter. Clarity is good, as the solids generally are on the large side (compared to other things we strain out) and it doesn't absorb any of the liquid (better yields). For other stuff, I mostly use fine-meshed metal strainers and occasionally cloth.

As regards the Chemex filters, it occurs to me that iit might be helpful to moisten with water when fitting into a sieve, which will soften the filter and make it easier to conform to the sieve. Just a thought.

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